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Tue. 01/15/19
State Trauma Advisory Board meets January 18 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 01/15/19 3:43 PM

January 15, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

State Trauma Advisory Board meets January 18 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon State Trauma Advisory Board (STAB).

Agenda: Case presentation, discuss Oregon Stop the Bleed program, future state trauma hospital surveys, Oregon Trauma Registry data.

When: January 18, 1-4:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland. The meeting also is accessible via webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7980257989435053313.

Background: The State Trauma Advisory Board is established under ORS 431 to achieve continuous improvement in the quality of EMS care in Oregon. The committee is made of 18 members appointed by the director of the Oregon Health Authority.

Contact: Stella Rausch-Scott, committee coordinator, OHA Public Health Division, at 971-673-1322 or ausch-scott@state.or.us">stella.m.rausch-scott@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Stella Rausch-Scott at 971-673-1322, 711 TTY or ausch-scott@state.or.us">stella.m.rausch-scott@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Fee to Recycle at the Curb in Richland to Increase (Photo)
City of Richland - 01/15/19 3:33 PM
2019-01/5957/121132/solid_waste-01.jpg
2019-01/5957/121132/solid_waste-01.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/5957/121132/thumb_solid_waste-01.jpg

Since 2010, Richland residents have enjoyed the convenience of curbside recycling. Over 6,300 customers subscribe to the co-mingled, every-other week collection service. Beginning in February, the fee for this service will increase ninety cents, from $5.70 to $6.60 a month. 

Over the years, the costs of processing recycled materials climbed and the resale markets and international exports fell. City staff has been aware of these impacts and began informing residents of the increasing costs back in May of 2017. Residents were informed that a cost and market evaluation would be done in 2018, which could result in rate changes in 2019.

In 2018, as markets continued to slump, the city worked hard to absorb increasing costs. The cost and evaluation study showed that recycling processing costs had increased 185% since 2015.

The City’s Utility Advisory Committee and Staff recommended to City Council that an increase was necessary. During the January 2 council meeting, council voted in favor of increasing fees for residential and commercial recycling services. Residents and businesses who subscribe to curbside recycling will see a monthly increase starting in February. Residents with the standard 96-gallon blue container will see a ninety cent increase, from $5.70 to $6.60 a month, and businesses or those with a 300-gallon triple size gray container will see an increase of $2.20, from $13.90 to $16.10.

Commercial customers can view the recycling rate structure by visiting www.ci.richland.wa.us/solidwaste or by calling 942-7700.

Recycling drop boxes in Richland neighborhoods are still an option for those wanting to recycle, free of charge. To locate one near you, visit www.ci.richland.wa.us/recycle.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/5957/121132/solid_waste-01.jpg

Winning $77,000 while on the go thanks to Lottery mobile app (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 01/15/19 12:16 PM
Ali Al Hawamdeh
Ali Al Hawamdeh
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/4939/121119/thumb_Ali_Hawamdeh_photo.jpg

Jan. 15, 2019 – Salem, Ore. – Ali Al Hawamdeh is the type of co-worker everyone loves.

The car salesman from Portland said he loves playing Keno, and after winning $77,224, went back to work and bought lunch for all of his co-workers.

“It was funny because all the sales people were out to lunch with me and we all started playing Keno to celebrate,” he said. “Everyone at work started playing because I won.”

Al Hawamdeh said he has specific numbers he picks, which he likes to keep top secret, and they paid off.

“I will buy a ticket with a bunch of games, and then watch some through the new mobile app as I can,” he said. “But what I like is then if I do get busy, I go back and can check the ticket or look at the past games if I want to check the ticket myself.”

Al Hawamdeh said he purchased the ticket at a 7-Eleven near where he works. Then took the ticket with him. He was busy and saw on the mobile app that someone had hit the Keno rolling 8-spot bonus. Players who play the Keno 8-spot have a chance at the bonus, which increases each game no one matches all eight numbers. In Al Hawamdeh’s case, the bonus had increased to $52,224. Ali also opted to play Special Keno which offers players a different prize structure that increases larger prizes, but decreases lower prizes. With Special Keno by matching all eight numbers he won $25,000.

“I saw someone had hit the bonus and checked my ticket,” he said. “I looked down and said OH MY GOD those are my numbers! I won it!”

Al Hawamdeh said with the prize he is going to help some family members financially and start off 2019 debt free.

During the 2015-17 biennium in Multnomah County, where Al Hawamdeh lives, more than $109 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, and watershed enhancement.

The Oregon Lottery has released a mobile app that is available on both iOS and Android devices. It can be found in the App Store or Google Play Store and provides responsible gambling tools, retailer locations, a ticket scanner and more.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Attached Media Files: Ali Al Hawamdeh

Grants available for electric vehicle charging stations through Pacific Power grant program
Pacific Power - 01/15/19 11:00 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media contact: Drew Hanson, 503-813-6678

1/15/2019

Grants available for electric vehicle charging stations through Pacific Power grant program

Up to $115,000 available to applicant projects that show innovation and creativity around promoting sustainable transportation

YAKIMA, WASHINGTON – Washington State has a goal to register 50,000 electric vehicles by 2020. Pacific Power is helping to make that electric transportation goal a reality through an electric vehicle charging station grant program. The program will help fund up to 100 percent of the eligible costs of installing electric vehicle charging stations for selected non-residential applicants.

The application cycle opens on Jan. 15, 2019. Up to $115,000 in grants will be available during the first cycle with a total of $900,000 awarded in Washington in quarterly cycles by the end of 2019.

“As an active member in the communities we serve, Pacific Power wants to help our customers achieve their sustainable energy goals,” said Cory Scott, director of customer solutions. “The electric vehicle charging station grant program is one of the ways we’re empowering local businesses, non-profits and governments to pick up speed toward more charging options for electric vehicle owners.”

All non-residential Pacific Power customers in Washington are eligible to apply with preference given to community-focused organizations, such as 501(c)(3) and city, county and regional governments.

Applications will be accepted up to Feb. 15, 2019 at 5:00 PM. Recipients will be announced March 2019.

Examples of projects eligible for grants include, but are not limited to:   

  • Businesses of all sizes installing chargers as an amenity for customers and employees.
  • Multi-unit housing owners installing chargers for tenants, either in support of tenant-owned electric cars or in conjunction with offering electric cars for tenant use.
  • Chargers for community car sharing programs to improve access and charging to electric cars in underserved communities.

For detailed eligibility requirements, project qualifications and application forms, please visit pacificpower.net/ev-grants.

Materials may be submitted to plugin@pacificpower.net.

To learn more about the benefits of electric vehicles, visit pacificpower.net/ev.


Grants available for electric vehicle charging stations through Pacific Power grant program
Pacific Power - 01/15/19 10:55 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media contact: Drew Hanson, 503-813-6678

1/15/2019

 

Grants available for electric vehicle charging stations through Pacific Power grant program

Up to $300,000 available to applicant projects that show innovation and creativity around promoting sustainable transportation

PORTLAND, OREGON – Oregon has a goal to register 50,000 electric vehicles by 2020. Pacific Power is helping to make that electric transportation goal a reality through an electric vehicle charging station grant program. The program will help fund up to 100 percent of the eligible costs of installing electric vehicle charging stations for selected non-residential applicants.

The application cycle opens on Jan. 15, 2019. Up to $300,000 in grants will be available during this cycle with a total of $1.45 million in Oregon awarded in quarterly cycles through the end of 2019.

“As an active member in the communities we serve, Pacific Power wants to help our customers achieve their sustainable energy goals,” said Cory Scott, director of customer solutions. “The electric vehicle charging station grant program is one of the ways we’re empowering local businesses, non-profits and governments to pick up speed toward more charging options for electric vehicle owners.”

All non-residential Pacific Power customers in Washington are eligible to apply with preference given to community-focused organizations, such as 501(c)(3) and city, county and regional governments.

Applications will be accepted up to Feb. 15, 2019 at 5:00 PM. Recipients will be announced March 2019.

Examples of projects eligible for grants include, but are not limited to:   

  • Businesses of all sizes installing chargers as an amenity for customers and employees.
  • Multi-unit housing owners installing chargers for tenants, either in support of tenant-owned electric cars or in conjunction with offering electric cars for tenant use.
  • Chargers for community car sharing programs to improve access and charging to electric cars in underserved communities.

For detailed eligibility requirements, project qualifications and application forms, please visit pacificpower.net/ev-grants.

Materials may be submitted to plugin@pacificpower.net.

To learn more about the benefits of electric vehicles, visit pacificpower.net/ev.


New law requires EMS agencies to use electronic patient care reporting system
Oregon Health Authority - 01/15/19 10:32 AM

January 15, 2019

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

New law requires EMS agencies to use electronic patient care reporting system

OHA offers system free to agencies to report on every patient contact

The Oregon Health Authority is helping ambulance service agencies comply with a new law requiring they use electronic patient care reporting, which will streamline how they exchange information with hospital emergency departments and other health care partners.

Oregon Senate Bill 52, passed during the 2017 legislative session, mandates that transporting emergency medical services (EMS) agencies begin posting patient care reports electronically to a statewide database starting Jan. 1, 2019. OHA offers access to Oregon EMS Information System (OR-EMSIS) at no cost to all EMS agencies, regardless of what vendor an agency uses locally to gather and submit the patient care data. OHA’s free service includes use of a software program called ImageTrend Elite.

"This system effectively replaces the old paper system using clipboards and pens, that once was the predominant form of patient care reporting," said David Lehrfeld, MD, medical director for the EMS Program at the OHA Public Health Division. "Incorporating smart tablets that most people are already familiar with, this system is so much faster, so much more efficient, and will improve patient care and health outcomes."

EMS agencies simply choose their preferred software vendors—more than 40 are available—and work with OHA to test the product. They then run through a checklist for transitioning to the new system.

When contact with a patient is made during a call, EMS personnel log in to the system using a tablet device and create an electronic patient care record, which charts the patient’s assessment and care. Each piece of patient data is securely submitted to the hospital receiving the patient, as well as to OHA, which uses the information to assess clinical performance, quality improvement and effects of prehospital medical care.

More than half of Oregon EMS transport agencies (73 out of 136) have moved to the new data standard as of Dec. 31, with one in five Oregon agencies transitioning in 2018 (27 transport agencies). The remainder of agencies have been granted waivers to begin submitting data later in 2019. Visit http://healthoregon.org/or-emsis and look for "Agency Status" to see overall transition status of EMS transport agencies, along with the names of agencies and vendors who have achieved live status.

Drew Norris, deputy chief of EMS at Bend Fire & Rescue, said the system has improved patient calls "a ton."

"We couldn’t turn back now, now that we’re on this electronic patient care reporting system," Norris said. "It helps us get information to the hospitals. We’re able to post in the back of the ambulance to (ImageTrend) Hospital Hub, which is at each hospital, and give them information they need to help treat the patient sooner and more effectively once we get to the hospital."

Sherry Bensema, EMS coordinator at Lyons Rural Fire District and Ambulance Service, said the system has allowed her agency to be more responsive to the community’s needs—now and in the future.

 "We know we have a 7.5 percent increase in call volume this year because of the reports that I can run," Bensema said. "And then the dashboard in the product actually lets me spool up a unique report so I can actually see trends on my dashboard that I need to track on a monthly basis."

Kristy Carey, administrative specialist at Bend Fire & Rescue, likes that the system is user-friendly and customizable. "Once we got the crews on board and using it, after maybe a month, six weeks, they were like ‘Why didn’t we do this sooner?’"

For more information on the new system:

# # #


February Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits to be issued early
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/15/19 10:07 AM

As a result of the partial federal government shutdown, the U.S Department of Agriculture has asked states to provide early issuance of February benefits for those who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) for food security.

The 615,405 Oregonians currently enrolled in SNAP will see their next monthly allocation by January 20th.

“We want to be clear that these are not additional funds that SNAP recipients are receiving, but an early issuance of February benefits,” stated Self-Sufficiency Director Kim Fredlund. “Those who typically see additional funds added to their EBT card the first week of each month will see their February money by January 20, rather than at the beginning of next month.”

A notification letter is being sent to current SNAP participants this week, and DHS is asking SNAP participants to carefully budget their food benefits through February.

DHS is awaiting further direction regarding benefit issuance for January recertification that is completed or processed after January 15. The early issuance will proceed, even if the federal government shutdown ends prior to January 20.

If people are concerned about running out of SNAP benefits, they can contact 211Info to seek local food resources.

To find a local DHS office, go to www.oregon.gov/dhs and click on Office Locations.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon December 2018 News Release
Oregon Employment Department - 01/15/19 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Rises to 4.1 Percent in December                                                              

Oregon’s unemployment rate rose to 4.1 percent in December from 3.9 percent in November. Oregon’s unemployment rate has been close to 4 percent for the past two years. The U.S. unemployment rate also edged up two-tenths of a percentage point, to 3.9 percent in December from 3.7 percent in November.

In December, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment grew by 300 jobs, following a revised gain of 300 jobs in November. These two months of nearly flat employment trends followed four months of fairly rapid job gains that averaged 3,700 per month during July through October. In December, leisure and hospitality added 1,600 jobs, health care and social assistance added 1,000, and government added 900. The industries declining the most in December were professional and business services, which dropped by 1,900 jobs, and retail trade, which cut 1,500 jobs.

The federal government shutdown did not impact Oregon’s December federal government jobs tally.

Leisure and hospitality reflected solid demand for employees over the past four months. During a time of year when demand for restaurant services is typically declining, the industry kept total employment levels above the normal seasonal trends. Recent gains followed weaker hiring during the upswing from January through August. Looking at the longer term, leisure and hospitality added 2,500 jobs (a gain of 1.2%) over the past 12 months.

Retail trade experienced a weak holiday hiring period; employment dropped 3,000 jobs between October and December. This followed minimal growth going back to early 2017. In the past 12 months, retail trade cut 1,400 jobs (-0.7%) and was the only major industry with a drop of more than 1,000 jobs in that time. The sporting goods, hobby, book and music stores component of retail has downsized over the past few years due to changes in how customers acquire their goods and services. It employed 10,000 in December, which was a decline of 900 jobs since December 2017.

Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment increased by 30,800 jobs, or 1.6 percent, since December 2017. In that time, construction remained the fastest growing industry, with a gain of 4,900 jobs or 4.8 percent. Only two other major industries grew by 3 percent or more: other services (+2,000 jobs, or 3.1%) and transportation, warehousing and utilities (+1,900 jobs, or 3.0%).

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the December county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Wednesday, January 23rd, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for January on Tuesday, March 5th.

Notes:

All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted except for the retail trade component industry “sporting goods, hobby, book and music stores.”

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the April, May, and June 2018 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

Effective with the January 2018 data, employment of Oregon’s approximately 17,000 home care workers are counted in private health care and social assistance instead of state government. The change was due to legislative action clarifying that for purposes of workforce and labor market information, home care workers are not employees of state government. The reclassification affects private sector and government monthly change figures for January 2018 and will affect over-the-year change figures through December 2018. It does not affect total payroll employment levels.

The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon December 2018 News Release

New year, new income tax withholding
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 01/15/19 9:25 AM

SALEM, Ore.—The Department of Revenue is encouraging taxpayers to start the new year with a paycheck checkup to ensure they’re withholding enough from their wages this year. Not withholding appropriately in 2019 could lead to an unexpected tax bill in 2020.

State and federal tax liabilities are different because tax rates and other items claimed on returns—such as deductions and credits—are different. In past years, these differences were minimal enough that Oregonians were able to use the federal Form W-4 to calculate their Oregon withholding appropriately. However, recent federal tax law changes, including how withholding allowances are calculated, mean that the federal form no longer consistently meets Oregon’s needs.

For tax year 2019, Oregon’s new Form OR-W-4 and online withholding calculator allow taxpayers to more accurately determine the appropriate amount to withhold for Oregon. Employers should provide the OR-W-4 to employees anytime they provide them with the federal W-4. Both the Form OR-W-4 and the calculator are available at the department’s website at www.oregon.gov/dor.

While everyone should check their withholding annually, some groups of taxpayers are more at risk for under-withholding than others, including taxpayers who:

  • Started a new job in 2018.
  • Updated their federal Form W-4 in 2018.
  • Previously claimed federal deductions that were impacted by federal tax law changes, such as the employee business expense deduction.
  • Live in a two-earner household.

Personal income taxes are the foundation of Oregon’s General Fund. The pay-as-you-earn system of personal income tax withholding is an established and consistent revenue stream that supports the public services Oregonians depend on.

Most employees have a portion of their wages withheld to cover their state and federal income tax liability for the year. Employees are responsible for determining the appropriate number of allowances to claim, which will dictate how much their employer withholds. The employer sends the amount withheld to the Department of Revenue, where it is credited to the employee. When the employee files their annual tax return, the amount of tax due shown on the return is reconciled against the record of withholding for the year. If there was too much withheld, it results in a refund. If there wasn’t enough withheld, the employee will need to pay the difference by April 15.

 


Let's not celebrate quitters' day
SAIF - 01/15/19 9:13 AM

Summary: 3 ways to support your workers’ resolutions

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While many recognize the new year as a chance to kickstart healthier habits, SAIF encourages you and your employees not to celebrate the next holiday on our calendars: quitters’ day. According to research by Strava, January 17 is the day most people will abandon their resolutions.

“Making resolutions is easy—keeping them is hard,” says Liz Hill, Total Worker Health® advisor at SAIF. “Making healthy habits a little more convenient can go a long way to helping your workers achieve their personal goals.”

Hill adds there are many benefits to having a healthy workforce.

“Just like your work can impact your home life, your life outside of work can impact your safety at work,” says Hill. “For instance, if you don’t get enough sleep every night, your risk of injury increases.”

That’s why SAIF is offering new free resources for promoting safe and healthy workplaces. The new content includes videos, posters, and one-page guides with tips on healthy eating, stress reduction, physical activity, and more.

As Hill explains, “your employees spend such a large percentage of their day at work, so it’s key to ensure the workplace supports their efforts.”

Here are three ways Hill says you can help employees skip right over quitters’ day:

  • Eat healthy: Provide refrigerators and microwaves in break rooms so workers can bring healthy food from home. Reduce or eliminate junk food in vending machines and subsidize healthy choices.
     
  • Get active: Make sure schedules are flexible and staffing is adequate to allow for quick walking breaks or a workout during the work day. Set an example by scheduling walking meetings. 
     
  • Reduce stress: Support employee engagement by promoting a sense of purpose and autonomy, providing opportunities for learning and new experiences, and letting employees know they are valued.

For more ways to be well at work and at home, visit saif.com/promotehealth.

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.


Nine year old seriously injured after crash on Hwy 22E - Marion County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 01/15/19 8:38 AM
2019-01/1002/121103/22_E_MP_27_1.jpg
2019-01/1002/121103/22_E_MP_27_1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1002/121103/thumb_22_E_MP_27_1.jpg

On Monday, January 14, 2019 at approximately 7:35 P.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 22E near milepost 27.

Preliminary investigation shows that a 2004 Honda Pilot, operated by Brandy Doudna (42) of Mill City, was eastbound on Hwy 22E when she swerved to avoid hitting a deer.  The vehicle struck the guardrail and stopped perpendicular in the roadway.  Doudna attempted to move the vehicle but was unable.  As the occupants were exiting the vehicle a 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee, operated by Kitaira Harvey (21) of Bend, was eastbound and struck the Honda Pilot.

A nine year old that was exiting the Honda Pilot was ejected in the impact. The child was taken to a local hospital and later transported by Life Flight to a Portland hospital.

No other occupants were transported as a result of the collision.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1002/121103/22_E_MP_27_1.jpg

Mon. 01/14/19
Vision Screening Bill Will Help Struggling Students
Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation - 01/14/19 5:34 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Doug Thompson or Nicole Mandarano at (503) 413-7399

NEWS RELEASE

Vision Screening Bill Will Help Struggling Students

New Bill will sustain resources to cover vision screening for Oregon's students

PORTLAND, January 14, 2019 – With many children struggling early in their school years due to undiagnosed vision issues, a simple investment has made a world of difference for thousands of Oregon’s young people.

Oregon Senate Bill 152 and 289 will be introduced in January and is designed to increase the level of funding to cover vision screenings for students in public school districts and preschools statewide.

“As a former high school principal and teacher, I can’t overstate the value of catching vision issues early so that we can correct them and kids can work to their potential,” said Sen. Arnie Roblan, of Coos Bay, a chief co-sponsor of the bill. “Once a student begins to believe that he or she is not able to keep up in school – even though with vision correction they would be doing just fine – it can have a devastating impact on their academic future and career prospects. Sometimes, it turns out, a student is far more capable than their performance shows, but vision correction makes all the difference in the world. This bill will help school districts identify vision issues early to help keep kids on the right path.”

In 2017, SB 187 was unanimously approved and passed by both the Oregon House and Senate and was signed into law by Governor Kate Brown. The law provided $1 million and established the Vision Health Account and directed the Oregon Department of Education to reimburse public schools and preschool programs for costs associated with vision screening for students. It also allows the Oregon Department of Education to designate non-profit providers to administer the screenings and adopt administrative rules for prioritizing grants if reimbursement requests exceed the allotted amount. Gifts and outside grants can be used to supplement the account, which will include $1 million in state funding. Senate Bill 152 and 289 will increase the Vision Health Account to $2 million per biennium, enough to cover 70% of Oregon students Kindergarten through 8th grade.

Vision is critical to a child’s ability to learn, as 80 percent of all learning during a child’s first 12 years comes through vision, according to written testimony submitted by the Oregon Optometric Physicians Association during the committee process. That same document adds that 25 percent of school-age children have vision problems, and 60 percent of students identified as problem learners have undetected vision problems. The picture gets bleaker, according to the report, when vision problems go undiagnosed, as 70 percent of juvenile offenders have undiagnosed vision problems.

Doug Thompson, Executive Director of the Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation, said: "The passage of this law will provide funding for the annual vision screening of about 70% of Oregon’s preschool, elementary, and high school students and will help to ensure that more Oregon students who need eye exams and new eyeglasses receive them, will see better and read at grade level, and will be more likely to succeed in school and graduate from high school. This will be a real win for Oregon's children!"

As part of its ‘2020 Vision’ plan, the Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation is proud to announce that it will be going back to the Oregon Legislature this month to seek a larger appropriation for the 2019-2021 biennium to ensure that ALL of Oregon’s school children are able to receive annual vision screening and have a level playing field to see and learn to their full potential.

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EMS Committee meets January 18 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/19 5:00 PM

January 14, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

EMS Committee meets January 18 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon EMS Committee.

Agenda: Vote for chair; Oregon EMS Information System; Oregon State Patrol first responder notice; rural EMS support.

When: January 18, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The meeting also is accessible via webinar at

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4849352449854427137.

Background: The EMS Committee was established under ORS 682 to achieve continuous improvement in the quality of EMS care in Oregon. The committee is made of 18 members appointed by the director of the Oregon Health Authority.

Contact: Stella Rausch-Scott, committee coordinator, OHA Public Health Division, at 971-673-1322 or ausch-scott@state.or.us">stella.m.rausch-scott@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Stella Rausch-Scott at 971-673-1322, 711 TTY or ausch-scott@state.or.us">stella.m.rausch-scott@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Lena Tucker selected to be Deputy State Forester (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 01/14/19 4:52 PM
Lena Tucker has been named as Oregon's new Deputy State Forester
Lena Tucker has been named as Oregon's new Deputy State Forester
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1072/121093/thumb_Lena_Tucker_2018.jpg

(SALEM, Ore.) – The Oregon Department of Forestry today announced the selection of Lena Tucker as the next Deputy State Forester. Tucker follows Nancy Hirsch, who retired from the position in December. Under the department’s current organizational structure, the Deputy State Forester serves as the Deputy Director for Operations, overseeing the agency’s operating programs in Fire Protection, Private Forests, and State Forests.

"I am very excited to work with Lena in her new role. She has a proven record of leadership within the department and at the local and national levels,” said State Forester Peter Daugherty.

Tucker joined the department in 1994. She brings a range of experience from geographic areas throughout Oregon and has worked in all of the department’s program areas, including Fire Protection. Most recently she served as the agency’s Private Forests Division Chief, where she focused on implementation of the Oregon Forest Practices Act, forest health, technical assistance programs to help private forest landowners, and the Urban and Community Forestry Program. She earned her bachelor’s degree in forest management from Northern Arizona University. Tucker, who lives in Sweet Home, Ore., is a member of that city’s Tree Commission and has been involved nationally with the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) for over a decade. She is also a Certified Forester through the Society of American Foresters.

“I am committed to the mission of ODF: serving Oregonians by protecting, managing and promoting stewardship of Oregon’s forests to enhance environmental, economic, and community sustainability,” Tucker said.

Under an existing transition plan, Tucker will take over full responsibility for the position on July 1, 2019.




Attached Media Files: Lena Tucker has been named as Oregon's new Deputy State Forester

OHA to convene Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/19 4:33 PM

January 14, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@state.or.us">saerom.y.england@state.or.us

Task force inquiries: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA to convene Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force

Applications due by Feb. 1

Oregon Health Authority is seeking applicants to serve on a task force that will develop clinical guidelines on opioid tapering.

These guidelines will build on the work of previous task forces that developed statewide opioid guidelines for chronic pain, acute pain, dentists and pregnant women. The existing guidelines have been built on available evidence, other federal and state guidelines, expert opinion, and public comment. Their purpose is to guide clinical decisions and encourage safe and compassionate prescribing and pain treatment statewide.

The Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force should represent diverse perspectives and experiences with long-term opioids and tapering, including community members. Task force members would serve as appointees of OHA Director Patrick Allen. Those who wish to serve on the board should apply by 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1, 2019. Appointment decisions are expected to be announced in February. The task force will meet publicly once a month from March to August. The application and more details on the process are available on the OHA website.

OHA’s efforts to change the conversation and promote evidence-based pain treatment are contributing to significant progress in the opioid epidemic. Oregon’s prescription opioid-related deaths have decreased by 45 percent since 2006 and the rate of opioid prescription fills decreased by 28 percent since 2015.

 "In addition to preventing unnecessary and risky introduction of opioids to new patients, chronic pain patients currently receiving long-term opioids need compassionate, skilled care to taper to safer doses," said Katrina Hedberg, MD, state health officer and epidemiologist at OHA. "However, there are few resources and evidence related to tapering that clinicians can look to for guidance. We hope bringing together experts and community members around the state will help us develop a useful framework that promotes trusting dialogue, competent care and patient safety."

As part of Oregon’s broader efforts to reduce and prevent opioid-related harms, OHA has been expanding Oregon Health Plan coverage for a wide range of evidence-based pain management services. In July 2016 coverage went into effect for the treatment of back pain with services such as chiropractic manipulation, physical and occupational therapy, and acupuncture. This effort was coupled with reductions in opioid coverage for back pain to improve patient safety and function. OHA is considering a similar coverage update for several other chronic pain conditions that are not currently covered by OHP, including fibromyalgia. The topic is on the Jan. 17 meeting agenda of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Value-based Benefits Subcommittee (VbBS).

"During the public deliberations of potentially adding coverage for certain chronic pain patients, while restricting access to opioids, it became clear that we needed to take a step back to fully consider the unintentional consequences of tapering patients too quickly or without adequate individualized support," said Dana Hargunani, MD, chief medical officer at OHA. "We appreciate the many patients, advocates and health experts who spoke up about their concerns."

While the evidence of harms related to long-term opioid use have been clear, much less is known about the potential risks of tapering. Patients and clinicians have advocated for personalized care with close attention to patients’ behavioral health and quality of life.

The taper guidelines task force members will meet in public in Portland. A conference line will be available for task force and community members who are unable to attend in person.

More information:

Opioid prescribing guidelines

Jan. 17 VbBS meeting agenda and materials

Application

Overview

# # #


Marine Board Meeting January 22 in Clackamas
Oregon Marine Board - 01/14/19 2:59 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board will hold their next quarterly Board meeting on January 22, beginning at 9 am.  The meeting will be held at Clackamas Community College, McLoughlin Hall, 19600 Molalla Ave., in Oregon City.  Food and drink are not allowed in the McLoughlin Room.   

The Board will consider adopting rules for Boat Operations on Turner Lake (OAR 250-020-0259) and Marine Sanitation Device Requirements (OAR 250-010-0750); and the Newberg Pool on the Willamette River which encompasses Clackamas (OAR 250-020-0032) Marion and Yamhill Counties (OAR 250-020-0385).  The public comment period for these items is closed.  

Following the rule actions, the Board will review and deliberate Cycle Three boating facility grants. 

For more information and to view the staff report, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx.

For a map to Clackamas Community College, McLoughlin Hall, visit http://bit.ly/2PxKLvQ.

###


Work begins to explore leaks at the Capitol Mall parking structure
State of Oregon - 01/14/19 2:59 PM

A contractor for the Oregon Department of Administrative Services (DAS) will begin exploratory work to determine the potential sources of water leaks in the roof of the Capitol Mall parking structure, beginning Thursday, Jan. 17. While equipment will be deployed to the grounds and some soil will be disturbed, major plantings such as trees will not be affected in any way.

Survey work will take place Jan. 17 and Jan. 18. However, the most notable activity involves several exploratory excavations to test soils and groundwater levels, and this will take place Jan. 20 and Jan. 21. Excavation will primarily occur at several areas above ground in grassy areas. All work is purely exploratory; there will be absolutely no tree removal involved.

Project work beyond Jan. 21 will include evaluating storm sewer and irrigation utilities, and assessing existing HVAC, plumbing, fire sprinkler, and electrical systems. The contractor will also evaluate the structural conditions inside the parking garage based on current seismic standards and codes.

All on-site work will be completed by February 1, 2019. The contractor will deliver a final report to DAS in April 2019 that will include options for structural remediation and corrective measures, as well as a recommended plan of action. DAS will make the report and its determination around possible next steps available to the public and work in partnership with the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department on any needed solutions.

####

Opened in 1991, the Capitol Mall parking structure is an underground parking facility used by state employees and members of the public. It is located between Court and Center Streets and between 12th and Winter Streets. The structure is owned and maintained by DAS. When the Capitol Mall was redeveloped for the parking structure in 1991, the double row of ornamental cherry trees at the State Capitol State Park (above the garage) was introduced. The park is maintained by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.


Pacific Power customers will see lower rates as company passes along federal tax savings
Pacific Power - 01/14/19 11:46 AM

Pacific Power customers will see lower rates as company passes along federal tax savings

 

YAKIMA, Wash.—Jan. 14, 2019—Following through on a pledge made when the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act became law, Pacific Power’s customers in Washington will see a decrease in their bills starting Jan. 1, 2019.

 

Under the tax cut-related reduction, the average Washington residential customer using 1,200 kilowatt hours of electricity per month will see a bill decrease of approximately 3 percent, from an average of $98.21 to an average of $95.32 per month after Jan. 1

 

“This was a pledge we made and were determined to keep,” said Lori Froehlich, regional business manager for Pacific Power in the Yakima Valley. “Whenever we can pass along savings to our customers, we do. In this case tax policy changes enabled us to reduce annual operating expenses. In other instances, we save money by innovating within our own operations or investing wisely in renewable energy. All of these efficiencies are designed to increase the savings and overall value we deliver to our customers.”

 

At the same time, Froehlich pointed out that customer bills have many different elements. While the tax cut reflects an ongoing reduction in cost, other elements of a customer bill vary according to market conditions and other variable costs. Those fluctuations can make understanding energy usage and costs confusing.

 

If customers have questions about their bill, Pacific Power representatives are available 24/7 to help answer questions, assist with energy usage reviews and payment assistance plans. The company’s aim is to provide customers with safe, reliable and affordable energy to help customers run their households and businesses.

 

Customers with questions about their bill can call Pacific Power any time at 888-221-7070.


Pacific Power customers will see lower rates as company passes along federal tax savings
Pacific Power - 01/14/19 11:44 AM

Pacific Power customers will see lower rates as company passes along federal tax savings

 

Walla Walla, Wash.—Jan. 14, 2019—Following through on a pledge made when the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act became law, Pacific Power’s customers in Washington will see a decrease in their bills starting Jan. 1, 2019.

 

Under the tax cut-related reduction, the average Washington residential customer using 1,200 kilowatt hours of electricity per month will see a bill decrease of approximately 3 percent, from an average of $98.21 to an average of $95.32 per month after Jan. 1

 

“This was a pledge we made and were determined to keep,” said Bill Clemens, regional business manager for Pacific Power in the Walla Walla area.[GT1]  “Whenever we can pass along savings to our customers, we do. In this case tax policy changes enabled us to reduce annual operating expenses. In other instances, we save money by innovating within our own operations or investing wisely in renewable energy. All of these efficiencies are designed to increase the savings and overall value we deliver to our customers.”

 

At the same time, Clemens pointed out that customer bills have many different elements. While the tax cut reflects an ongoing reduction in cost, other elements of a customer bill vary according to market conditions and other variable costs. Those fluctuations can make understanding energy usage and costs confusing.

 

If customers have questions about their bill, Pacific Power representatives are available 24/7 to help answer questions, assist with energy usage reviews and payment assistance plans. The company’s aim is to provide customers with safe, reliable and affordable energy to help customers run their households and businesses.

 

Customers with questions about their bill can call Pacific Power any time at 888-221-7070.


 [GT1]I would do a slightly different version for Walla Walla with Bill quoted.


New Lottery ads highlight education funding, call for teacher of the year nominations
Oregon Lottery - 01/14/19 10:12 AM

Salem, Ore.; The Oregon Lottery launched a new ad campaign this week highlighting the largest slice of the lottery funding pie, education, and calling on Oregonians to nominate excellent teachers for Oregon’s Teacher of the Year program. Lottery partnered with the Oregon Department of Education and the Beaverton School District to showcase Oregon students and teachers, the ultimate beneficiaries of lottery dollars. Schools featured include Mountainside High School and Springville K-8 in the Beaverton School District.

For the 2017-18 school year alone, more than $380 million in lottery funding supported Oregon schools. In addition to the dedicated funding, Lottery is allocating marketing dollars to support Oregon’s Teacher of the Year Program, recognizing exceptional teachers across the state.

The nomination period for the Oregon Teacher of the Year program closes at the end of January. Anyone can nominate a teacher and all Oregonians are encouraged to nominate their favorite teacher today at oregonteacheroftheyear.org.

Thanks to the Oregon Department of Education’s partnership with the Oregon Lottery, the 2020 Oregon Teacher of the Year will receive a $5,000 cash prize (with a matching $5,000 going to their school) and serve as a spokesperson and representative for all Oregon teachers. In addition, Regional Teachers of the Year will receive a cash prize of $500 and will be celebrated across the state.

• Nominations are open statewide through January 31, 2019.

• Teachers will submit their applications by March 30, 2019.

• Each of the 19 Oregon Education Service Districts may select a winner from their region.

• Regional Teachers of the Year will be honored across the state in May 2019.

• In September 2019 one of the Regional Teachers of the Year will be named the 2020 Oregon Teacher of the Year.

If you have any questions, please contact Oregon Teacher of the Year program coordinator Jenni Knaus at 503-947-5860.

The education campaign marks another chapter in an effort to use marketing dollars to highlight the work of Lottery beneficiaries. In 2018 Lottery showcased state parks, watershed enhancement and veterans’ services.




Attached Media Files: Links for :30 and :15

Sat. 01/12/19
Bicyclist killed in crash on Hwy 30 - Multnomah County
Oregon State Police - 01/12/19 7:56 PM

On Saturday, January 12, 2019 at approximately 1:35 P.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a report of a collision involving a commercial motor vehicle and a bicycle on Hwy 30 near milepost 17 in Multnomah County.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a commercial motor vehicle - with no trailers, operated by Dustan Thompson (40) of St. Helens, was eastbound on Hwy 30 in the right lane when a bicycle, operated by Scott Graser (54) of Scappoose, entered the eastbound right lane and a collision occurred.

Graser sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Thompson was not injured and is cooperating with the investigation.

Investigation is continuing 

 


Single vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 260 - Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 01/12/19 7:37 PM
2019-01/1002/121057/20190112_042840.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1002/121057/thumb_20190112_042840.jpg

On Saturday, January 12, 2019 at approximately 2:35 A.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Hwy 260 near milepost 11 in Josephine County.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2006 Acura SUV, operated by Jason Barker (38) of Grants Pass, failed to negotiate a curve, drove off the roadway, and struck a tree. 

Barker sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. 

Alcohol is being investigated as a possible factor in the crash.

OSP was assisted by Rural Metro Fire and ODOT




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1002/121057/20190112_042840.jpg

Interagency Deadly Force Investigation Team releases name of deceased in January 11, 2019 Officer Involved Shooting in Eugene
Oregon State Police - 01/12/19 1:50 PM

The Interagency Deadly Force Investigation Team conducting the officer involved shooting investigation is releasing the name of the deceased.

Charles Frederick Landeros age 30 of Eugene.

Eugene Police Department News Release is copied below.

No further information is available for release at this time.

All media inquries should be made to the Lane County District Attorney's Office

EUGENE POLICE NEWS RELEASE

Officer-involved Shooting - Police Respond to Dispute at Cascade Middle School

At 10:27 a.m. today, January 11, Eugene Police responded to a custodial dispute involving an adult male at Cascade Middle School, 1525 Echo Hollow Road. As officers were escorting the male from the school, he produced a firearm and a struggle ensued. During the struggle the subject was shot by police and is now deceased. This occurred outside of the school. All students, staff and officers are safe and unharmed. Police remain at the school. 

During the incident, Cascade Middle School initiated lock-out procedures and are currently keeping students in the school until the end of the school day. 

Bethel will be working with the police department on school release. Information will be posted on the Bethel School District webpage. Please keep areas and roadways near the school free for emergency responders.

Per state law, the Interagency Deadly Force Investigation Team has been called and is  conducting the investigation. 


Fatal collision on Hwy 99W / Clow Corner Rd - Polk County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 01/12/19 7:24 AM
2019-01/1002/121051/20190111_200929.jpg
2019-01/1002/121051/20190111_200929.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1002/121051/thumb_20190111_200929.jpg

On Friday, January 11, 2019 at approximately 7:30 P.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle collision on Hwy 99W at the intersection of Clow Corner Rd. in Polk County.

Investigation reveals that a Chrysler 200, operated by Rosa Maria Rocha-Torres (19) of Salem, was stopped at the stop sign on Clow Corner waiting to cross or pull onto Hwy 99W.  Rocha-Torres pulled out into the path of Jeep Renegade, operated by Kevin Ruffino (32) of Independence, and was struck on the driver's side of her vehicle.

Rocha- Torres sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  Two teenage female passengers were transported to Salem Hospital with non life threatening injuries.

Ruffino sustained minor injuries and was not transported by medical personnel.

OSP was assisted by the Polk County Sheriff's Office, Polk County Fire Department, Polk County District Attorney, and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1002/121051/20190111_200929.jpg , 2019-01/1002/121051/20190111_200732.jpg

Fri. 01/11/19
Pacific Power Media Statement Regarding Fixed-Bill Pilot for Smart Meter Opt-out Customers
Pacific Power - 01/11/19 5:49 PM

Pacific Power Media Statement Regarding Fixed-Bill Pilot for Smart Meter Opt-out Customers

 

PORTLAND, Ore. — January 11, 2019 — Pacific Power issues the following statement regarding a proposal filed today with Public Utility Commission of Oregon:

 

Pacific Power’s rollout of smart meters continues in Oregon through 2019, an upgrade which gives customers greater insight into their home or business energy use and brings new benefits such as reduced outage times. We remain committed to supporting our customers during this change, responding to their needs and listening to their feedback.

 

This includes finding new ways to reduce the financial impact of fees charged to those who choose to opt-out of the upgrade, while ensuring costs remain fair to all customers. To reduce the upfront cost of opting out, we earlier removed the $137 fee covering a future replacement of a smart meter and continued to explore other fee options.

 

Today, we filed a proposal with the Public Utility Commission of Oregon for a new Fixed-Bill Pilot. The program is designed to help alleviate the financial impacts of the monthly $36 meter reading fee by reducing the number of annual meter reads. It also provides customers with greater predictability on their monthly bills with the same amount due each month.  

 

This proposal will be presented by Pacific Power during a public hearing in Salem on Tuesday, January 15 at 9:30 a.m. at the Public Utility Commission of Oregon. If approved by the Commission, the Fixed-Bill Pilot will be available as early as March 1 for an initial group of 200 customers. The program offers the following features:

 

  • Participating opt-out customers pay a monthly fixed dollar amount for a 12-month period and have their meter read three times per year.

 

  • The monthly payment includes an average of the customer’s most recent 12-month energy bills, a 7.5 percent adder fee to cover energy usage fluctuations, plus a $36 meter reading fee charged three times per year across 12 months or $9 per month. There would be no annual reconciliation against the customer’s energy consumption.    

 

  • Prior to the end of twelve months, the customer will receive a new offer for the next 12 month period and has the option to continue participation in the pilot.

 

  • Below is an example of a how a monthly bill on the pilot could be calculated (example is based on the average monthly use of 900 kWh for an Oregon residential customer).

 

            Average bill (based on prior 12 months):        $98.52 for 900 kWh per month

            7.5% Adder:                                                    $7.39

            Meter Reading Fee:                                        $9.00

            Monthly Payment:                                          $114.91

 

Customers who are interested in providing feedback may contact the Public Utility Commission of Oregon at 800-522-2404 or the Oregon Citizens’ Utility Board at 503-227-1984.

 

Customers can reach Pacific Power by calling 866-869-8520 or visit  www.pacificpower.net/smartmeter to learn more about smart meters.

 

Our statewide upgrade to 590,000 smart meters began in January 2018 and will conclude later this year. Nationwide, more than 70 million smart meters are already installed at homes and businesses, which includes half of all households in the U.S. Pacific Power smart meters are a key component to updating the energy grid initially built for technology from 100 years ago. They help us hold down operating costs, improve customer service and reliability while maintaining the highest standards of security and customer privacy.

 

NOTE TO EDITORS: This statement stands alone. However, we can also connect you with a Pacific Power executive to speak to this issue if requested. Contact the media hotline at 800-570-5838 to request an interview.


The Oregon Department of Corrections reports two in-custody deaths (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/11/19 4:47 PM
William Heyser
William Heyser
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-01/1070/121041/thumb_William_Heyser.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Lincoln Baker, died on the morning of January 11, 2019. He was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away in the Infirmary while receiving hospice care. 

Baker entered DOC custody on October 10, 2016, from Multnomah County.  His earliest release date was August 22, 2019. He was 59 years old.

DOC adult in custody, William Heyser died on January 10, 2019. He was incarcerated at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) and passed away at a local hospital.

William Heyser entered DOC custody on May 31, 2016 from Multnomah County.  His earliest release date was March 27, 2033. He was 55 years old. Next of kin have been notified for both men.

As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,900 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 male inmates. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, inmates with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.




Attached Media Files: William Heyser , Lincoln Baker

Walla Walla High School staff tour regional schools to review school designs following successful bond (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 01/11/19 11:29 AM
2019-01/1288/121024/WaHi_teachers_at_Pullman_HS.jpg
2019-01/1288/121024/WaHi_teachers_at_Pullman_HS.jpg
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WALLA WALLA – Thursday Walla Walla Walla High School staff serving on the Education Specification Bond Construction Planning Team toured Pullman High School, North Central High School (Spokane) and Ferris High School (Spokane) to review current educational designs and best practices. Representatives from Architects West and Wenaha Group construction management firm also participated.

These tours represent the launch of the Educational Specifications phase of the bond construction process with a goal of generating ideas and discussion about potential design decisions for the Walla Walla High School remodel.

“This step, referred to as ‘Ed Specs’, incorporates practitioner input in order to put some ‘meat’ to the general concepts approved by voters in November,” said Superintendent Wade Smith. “This input process helps inform a preliminary space layout and floorplan which is then shared with staff, community, students and others for continued input and refinement.”

The Ed Specs process will continue, with multiple opportunities for input, as the district slowly refines concepts into final construction documents over the coming months. Pioneer Middle School staff are tentatively set to tour regional schools in February.

PHOTO – Walla Walla High School science teachers (L-R) Jen Hein, Lenna Henry and art teacher Julie Laufenburg tour classrooms at Pullman High School.

###

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1288/121024/WaHi_teachers_at_Pullman_HS.jpg

Fatal Crash near Seal Rock (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 01/11/19 10:48 AM
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On Thursday, January 10, 2019 at about 8:45 pm, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle fatal crash on US Hwy 101 near milepost 152, just south of Seal Rock.

Preliminary investigation revealed a blue 2001 Lexus SUV, operated by Patricia Norenberg, age 55, of Waldport, was driving southbound on US Hwy 101 when she drifted into the northbound lane of travel.  A northbound gold 2008 Toyota van driven by Richard Larrett, age 85, of Lincoln City, and the two vehicles collided partially head-on. Larrett’s passenger, Judith Larrett, age 81, of Lincoln City, was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Norenberg and Richard Larrett were transported by ambulance to Newport’s Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital due to their injuries.  

US Hwy 101 was closed about just over 3 hours following the crash however, a detour had been established to help traffic. Agencies assisting OSP were Waldport Fire Department, Seal Rock Fire Department, Newport Fire Department, ODOT Incident Response/Maintenance, Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Department, and Newport Police Department.




Attached Media Files: 2019-01/1002/121022/Seal.JPG

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets January 17 in Salem
Oregon Health Authority - 01/11/19 8:35 AM

January 11, 2019

Media contact: Rebeka Gipson-King, 503-945-7141, ebeka.gipson-king@state.or.us">rebeka.gipson-king@state.or.us

Program contact: Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852, jacee.m.vangestel@state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets January 17 in Salem

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board.

When: January 17, 1-5 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Hospital, Brooks Conference Room, 2600 Center Street NE, Salem. The public can also attend via toll-free conference line at 888-278-0296, participant code 4294893.

Agenda: After the public comment period, topics will include updates on structural support of the advisory board, review of the charter, use of campus cottages, and the criteria for both transition for civil patients and supervised home visits.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the board’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/osh/Pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at

503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Media Advisory - Today, Jan. 11 - Human Trafficking Prevention Honors - Inaugural Awards
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/11/19 6:39 AM

WHAT: Today, January 11, 2019 from 10:30am-noon, Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum will honor the efforts of Oregonians who work to prevent human trafficking. This inaugural event on National Human Trafficking Awareness Day will raise awareness about Oregon’s current intervention efforts and recognize the work of those who are committed to promoting a trauma informed and victim-centered approach to trafficking intervention. This event is co-sponsored by the Oregon Department of Justice and the Oregon Department of Human Services.

DATE: Friday, Jan. 11, 2019

TIME: 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
(For media, awards begin at 11:15am.)

WHERE: 100 SW Market St., Portland

WHO: Ellen Rosenblum, Attorney General of Oregon; Jana McLellan, Deputy Director of Child Welfare Programs for the Oregon Department of Human Services

Honorees include Tiffany Underwood (Marion County District Attorney’s Office); Hillary Roeder (Oregon Department of Human Services-Child Welfare); Wendy Matthews (Oregon Department of Human Services-Child Welfare); Arielle Crist (A Village for One); Rusty Amos (Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office); Angela Hollan (Portland City Government); Rebecca Lusk (Oregon Department of Human Services); Robin Miller (Janus Youth Programs); Melissa Parker (J Bar J Youth Services)

COST: This event is free and open to the public.


Thu. 01/10/19
Committee for Family Forestlands meets Jan. 22 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 01/10/19 6:23 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Tuesday, Jan. 22 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Salem. The meeting will be in the Santiam Room of Building D on the campus of the Oregon Department of Forestry, 2600 State Street.  The committee will receive updates about:

  • recent work of ODF’s Private Forests Division
  • family forestland dwelling allowance
  • Siskiyou streamside protections review
  • pesticide stewardship partnership
  • an update on incentives
  • Operator of the Year winners for 2018

The meeting is open to the public. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.           

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. You can find more information at  https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx

                                                                             # # #


Registration Open for Annual Title I Parent Conference
ESD 123 - 01/10/19 1:23 PM

PASCO, WA – Parents of students in kindergarten through 12th grade can register now for the annual Title I Regional Parent Conference, taking place Friday, February 22 from 8:30 AM – 3:00 PM at the Red Lion Hotel in Pasco. Hosted by Educational Service District (ESD) 123 in partnership with the school districts, the conference is offered free-of-charge to parents and will include a variety of workshops on how to support children at home so they can be successful in school.

Conference workshops will cover topics such as barriers to academic success, positive communication with teenagers, preparing for immigration reform, and concerns about drugs, internet safety, violence prevention, and bullying. In addition, there will be a resource fair with informational booths from local community services.

All attendees must register for the conference by February 1. The conference is free for parents, as registration fees are paid by the school districts. There will be workshops in both Spanish and English, and interpretation may be available in selected sessions.

For more information, please contact Lupe Mota, Migrant Education Program Administrator, at 509.544.5756 or lmota@esd123.org.

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About ESD 123:  Educational Service District 123, based in Pasco, WA, is one of nine ESDs in Washington. Dedicated to delivering collaborative solutions that promote learning, ESD 123 serves 23 school districts in seven counties of Southeastern Washington. Under Superintendent Darcy Weisner and its board of directors, this legislatively mandated, not-for-profit educational organization provides efficiency of educational systems and equity of learning opportunities for over 70,000 Washington students. For more information about ESD 123, please call 509-544-5700 or 888-547-8441 or visit www.esd123.org.


Northwest Association for Blind Athletes to Host Inaugural Winter Camp for Children and Youth with Visual Impairments This Weekend in Naches, Washington
Northwest Assn. for Blind Athletes - 01/10/19 1:12 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Billy Henry, Founder/Executive Director
Northwest Association for Blind Athletes
311 West Evergreen Blvd, Ste. 200
Vancouver, Washington 98660
Local Phone: 1-360-718-2826
Toll Free: 1-800-880-9837
http://www.nwaba.org
henry@nwaba.org">bhenry@nwaba.org

Northwest Association for Blind Athletes to Host Inaugural Winter Camp for Children and Youth with Visual Impairments This Weekend in Naches, Washington

Vancouver, Washington—January 10th, 2019—Northwest Association for Blind Athletes (NWABA) announced today that it will host the organization’s inaugural winter camp for children and youth with visual impairments January 11th-13th at the Ghormley Meadow Retreat Center in Naches, WA.

NWABA’s Washington Winter Camp will provide opportunities to 12 children and youth from across Washington in its inaugural year. Campers will vary in socioeconomic status, ethnic background and level of skills and abilities. The purpose of Winter Camp is to empower blind or visually impaired children to break the cycle of dependence and ill health that is often associated with their disability. Campers will be encouraged to take control of their own quality of life, and will be empowered to use their many talents to actively contribute within their communities. A variety of sports and recreational activities including skiing, snowboarding, adapted broomball, cooperative games, snow tubing and other activities will be provided throughout the weekend.

“We are extremely honored to offer this truly transformational program for the first time this year to children and youth with visual impairments. NWABA’s Winter Camp will provide benefits that transcend participating in sports, and will help campers from across Washington State gain the confidence, self-esteem, friendships, and independence they need to achieve success in all areas of life,” said Founder and Executive Director Billy Henry

Winter Camp is funded in part by the Washington Department of Services for the Blind, but additional support is still needed. Donations are accepted to support Winter Camp by mailing a check to PO BOX 65265, Vancouver, WA, 98665 or making an online gift at www.nwaba.org. Please indicate that your donation is to support NWABA Washington Winter Camp 2019. For more information on the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, please contact Billy Henry at 1-360-718-2826, or visit www.nwaba.org

About NWABA:
The mission of Northwest Association for Blind Athletes (NWABA) is to provide life-changing opportunities through sports and physical activity to individuals who are blind and visually impaired. A group of visually impaired students formed the Association in 2007 to ensure that people who are blind were participating in sports and physical activity. Today, NWABA is a rapidly expanding charitable organization that provides more than 1,500 children, youth, adults and military veterans with visual impairments tailored programming, which improves self-confidence and self-esteem, promotes independence, creates an inclusive community of supporters, and builds the skills necessary to succeed in all areas of life including school and employment.

For information: http://www.nwaba.org  or
Contact: henry@nwaba.org">bhenry@nwaba.org
Phone:  1-360-718-2826

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Conference of Local Health Officials meets January 17 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 01/10/19 12:50 PM

January 10, 2019        

Contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets January 17 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO).

Agenda: Update on Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Committee work; change to WIC program element; School Based Health Center funding recommendation; possible Public Health Intergovernmental Agreement changes for 2019-2021.

When: January 17, 9:30-11:30 a.m. The meeting is open to the public. No conference call option is available for the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1C, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869, um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869, 711 TTY or um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Federal Workers Impacted by Shutdown may Find Financial Assistance Through Their Credit Unions
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 01/10/19 11:00 AM

TIGARD, Ore. (Jan. 10, 2019) — For thousands of government workers impacted by the partial federal government shutdown, tomorrow will be the first day they don’t get a paycheck. Many credit unions are standing by to help their members who are impacted.

As not-for-profit cooperative financial services providers, credit unions practice their “people helping people” philosophy and support their members through good and difficult times alike. Options such as short-term, low-interest loans, lower-interest credit cards, financial counseling, or opportunities to delay loan payments are examples of benefits credit unions offer their members.

“It’s a challenge to manage expenses without pay. If you’re a federal worker or contractor, alert your credit union and find out what options are available,” said Lynn Heider, Vice President, Communications, Northwest Credit Union Association. “Keep in mind that credit unions, as cooperatives, don’t pay Wall Street stockholders. Instead, they reinvest in their members by offering better interest rates and lower fees day in and day out. And in challenging times, credit unions are also likely to have additional options for you.”

Nearly anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Oregon is eligible to join a local credit union. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit http://www.asmarterchoice.org.

                                                                            <END>

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the trade association representing over 180 not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 7.3  million consumer members. Those members are served by a professional workforce of 18,700 professionals. According to an independent analysis by economists at ECONorthwest, Northwest credit unions drove a positive economic impact of $7.7 billion last year.

 




Attached Media Files: News Release

Federal Workers Impacted by Shutdown may Find Financial Assistance Through Their Credit Unions
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 01/10/19 10:56 AM

SEATAC, Wash. (Jan. 10, 2019) —For thousands of government workers impacted by the partial federal government shutdown, tomorrow will be the first day they don’t get a paycheck. Many credit unions in Washington are standing by to help their members who are impacted.

As not-for-profit cooperative financial services providers, credit unions practice their “people helping people” philosophy and support their members through good and difficult times alike. Options such as short-term, low-interest loans, lower-interest credit cards, financial counseling, or opportunities to delay loan payments are examples of benefits credit unions offer their members.

“It’s a challenge to manage expenses without pay. If you’re a federal worker or contractor, alert your credit union and find out what options are available,” said Lynn Heider, Vice President, Communications, Northwest Credit Union Association. “Keep in mind that credit unions, as cooperatives, don’t pay Wall Street stockholders. Instead, they reinvest in their members by offering better interest rates and lower fees day in and day out. And in challenging times, credit unions are also likely to have additional options for you.”

Nearly anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Washington is eligible to join a local credit union. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit http://www.asmarterchoice.org.

<END>

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the trade association representing over 180 not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 7.3  million consumer members. Those members are served by a professional workforce of 18,700 professionals. According to an independent analysis by economists at ECONorthwest, Northwest credit unions drove a positive economic impact of $7.7 billion last year.




Attached Media Files: News Release