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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Wed. Sep. 28 - 9:28 am
Wed. 09/28/22
WSU Tri-Cities to offer workforce training opportunities under expanded programming in collaboration with Port of Benton, City of Richland, and Visit Tri-Cities
WSU Tri-Cities - 09/28/22 8:00 AM

RICHLAND, Wash. – Washington State University Tri-Cities is offering workforce training opportunities under an expanded professional development learning program with initial collaboration offered by the City of Richland, Port of Benton, and Visit Tri-Cities.

The courses in these certificate programs are designed for professionals at varying levels, including entry level workers, early-career supervisors, mid-level employees and managers, and business owners across organizations and industries. Professionals in non-business roles such as healthcare and those without an undergraduate or business degree can also benefit. Designed to enhance professional growth, these courses develop skillsets for an ever-changing workforce landscape.

Joan Giese, associate professor of marketing and director of Lifelong Learning at WSU Tri-Cities Carson College of Business said, “The over-arching goal of these programs is to offer a professional development pathway to prepare, upskill and reskill employees. For employers, this program can help enhance employee experience, satisfaction and retention while resulting in organization-wide growth and stability.” 

“These courses offer a practical resource that can quickly address worker training and growth in a constantly evolving economy,” said Miles Thomas, director of economic development and government affairs at the Port of Benton. “Effective career skills result in job fulfillment, recruitment and promotion that the Port sees as a clear nexus for community investment.” 

“Many of our hospitality related businesses are struggling to find and retain qualified candidates to support the services they provide. The courses offered under this program will help strengthen the industry and the visitor experience and will improve job satisfaction for tourism professionals,” said Kim Shugart, senior vice president of Visit Tri-Cities. “We appreciate the funding we received from the City of Richland through their Business License Reserve program which allowed us to participate.” 

Each course has been designed interactively with industry professionals starting with a needs assessment, development of topics and outcomes and finally testing the course. This fall, three professional development certificates will be offered: Wine Tasting Room Server certificate, Fundamentals of Business certificate, and Cultivating Service Excellence certificate. These certificate courses are delivered entirely online and can be completed whenever convenient. In addition, a course specifically designed for managers or owners, Financial Well-Being of the Organization, is scheduled for fall. This course will be delivered online with scheduled live training sessions and organization-specific application activities. Other courses specific to wine business and senior living are also offered. 

Individuals or businesses interested in career advancement can view upcoming course offerings and register through Washington State University Tri-Cities website at: https://tricities.wsu.edu/continuing-education/.

Scholarships for specific courses and series will be offered throughout the year by partner organizations. To determine eligibility and apply for scholarships as they are offered, please visit  https://www.visittri-cities.com/about/careers/wsu-workforce-training-opportunities. Public and private organizations are invited and encouraged to join the initial group in extending workforce benefits by contacting Joan Giese at joan.giese@wsu.edu.


Tue. 09/27/22
Local Red Cross Volunteers Depart for Florida Ahead of Hurricane Ian
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 09/27/22 8:18 PM

Nearly Two Dozen Volunteers from Oregon and Southwest WA Deploy to Florida or are on Standby To

 

Portland, Ore (September 27, 2022) - Trained disaster volunteers from the American Red Cross Cascades Region are headed to Florida in advance of hurricane Ian. Experts predict Florida could see as much as 15 inches of rain throughout this week which, combined with a dangerous storm surge, may trigger flooding across the state. 

The Red Cross is monitoring the situation closely and working with our partners to shelter and support people who could be impacted by this storm. Hundreds of trained disaster workers are being deployed to Florida and more relief supplies are on the way to support people in the path of Hurricane Ian. Seven volunteers from Oregon are either in Florida or on their way. Another 14 volunteers, including some from SW Washington, are on standby ready to respond if needed. 

The Red Cross is working with local officials and preparing to open hurricane evacuation shelters if requested. We help anyone in need after a disaster, and everyone is welcome in our shelters. 

Visit https://www.flickr.com/photos/redcrosscascades for photos from our local volunteers in Florida. 

How can you help?
Help people affected by disasters like storms and countless other crises by making a gift to American Red Cross Disaster Relief. Your gift enables the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small. Visit redcross.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS, or text the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

The disaster recovery effort continues in Puerto Rico. More than 270 American Red Cross disaster workers, many with no power or water themselves, are working around the clock with our partners to provide comfort and support. The Red Cross also is deploying disaster teams by plane to rural areas of Alaska where Typhoon Merbok devastated a thousand-mile stretch of the western coast last weekend, damaging homes, seawalls, roads and airport runways as well as water systems in as many as 40 towns and villages.

The Disaster Action Team needs you
These specialized volunteers provide emotional support, access to financial assistance, and valuable information to help families begin to recover. They offer immediate compassion and care when it is needed most. Additional Disaster Action Team volunteers are needed in Nevada and nationwide to ensure that there is always someone ready to answer the call when a disaster strikes. The Red Cross provides training and support. Learn more: redcross.org/volunteer.

Download our free apps
The Red Cross Emergency app can help keep you and your loved ones safe with real-time alerts, shelter locations, and safety advice. The Red Cross First Aid app provides instant access to information on handling the most common emergencies. Download these free apps by searching for ‘American Red Cross’ in your app store or visit redcross.org/apps.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

 

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Betsy Johnson Lies About Planned Parenthood PAC in Gubernatorial Debate
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 09/27/22 7:42 PM

Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon Executive Director An Do issued the following statement in response to flagrant lies spread by gubernatorial candidate Betsy Johnson in tonight’s debate:
 

As confirmed by the state’s largest newspaper last month, Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon invited Betsy Johnson to participate in our endorsement process. We didn’t receive a reply, nor did her campaign proactively reach out to us to inquire about our endorsement process. Yet tonight, she decided to lie to Oregon voters.
 

“These are not the actions of someone Oregon voters can trust to protect and expand access to essential reproductive health care. Tina Kotek is the only candidate who has sought and earned the endorsement of Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon after a rigorous and comprehensive process.
 

“Betsy Johnson has taken a number of concerning actions that do not align with reproductive freedom. In 2015, she voted against legislation to help patients keep their reproductive healthcare choices private. In 2021, she voted against legislation to make sure reproductive health services are protected during healthcare mergers. And in 2022, she spoke out against the Reproductive Health Equity Fund, which is helping Eastern Oregonians access essential care in the wake of Idaho’s cruel ban on abortion. 
 

“In 2022, governors are either pursuing every avenue to protect and expand abortion access, or they’re falling short. In opposing the Reproductive Health Equity Fund, Johnson has shown that she is found wanting.
 

“Instead of pursuing our endorsement, Johnson was more interested in garnering the approval of anti-abortion extremist and former gubernatorial candidate Bridget Barton. As reported by Oregon Capital Chronicle, Johnson appointed Barton to lead the ‘Republicans for Betsy’ group. Barton admitted, ‘[Christine] Drazan and Johnson are virtually identical on this issue.’”


Renton Doctor Pleads Guilty to Conspiring to Accept Kickbacks in Connection with Fraudulent Genetic Testing Scheme
U.S. Attorney's Office - Eastern Dist. of Wash. - 09/27/22 5:31 PM

Spokane, Washington – Vanessa R. Waldref, the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Washington, announced today that Christopher B. Bjarke, M.D., age 61, of Renton, Washington, pled guilty to conspiring to accept kickbacks in connection with a fraudulent genetic testing scheme that targeted elderly Medicare beneficiaries throughout Washington and in other states. Senior District Judge Rosanna Malouf Peterson accepted Dr. Bjarke’s guilty plea, and set sentencing for January 10, 2023 at 1:30 p.m. in Spokane, Washington. 

The Medicare program provides health insurance coverage for elderly and disabled Americans.  Medicare generally provides coverage for diagnostic laboratory testing only if the test is ordered by a physician who is treating the beneficiary for a specific medical problem, and uses the test results to treat the patient for that specific problem.  According to the Plea Agreement and information disclosed in court proceedings, Dr. Bjarke engaged in a conspiracy and scheme through which he placed orders for Medicare for genetic testing for Medicare beneficiaries in the Eastern District of Washington and elsewhere that he was not treating and with whom he had no physician-patient relationship.  According to the Plea Agreement and other court documents, Dr. Bjarke’s sole contact with these patients was when he was connected with the beneficiaries for a telephone call for a few minutes through telemarketers. After Dr. Bjarke had ordered the tests, the laboratories then billed Medicare for the test, while another company billed Medicare for a purported “telemedicine” visit, sometimes for as much as tens of thousands of dollars. 

According to the Plea Agreement, through this scheme and conspiracy, Dr. Bjarke’s orders were responsible for more than $18.6 million paid by Medicare.  In return for his participation in the scheme, between December 2020 and September 2021, Dr. Bjarke received $167,996.73 from his co-conspirators, which Dr. Bjarke admitted were kickbacks because they constituted payment in return for ordering medically unnecessary genetic testing and other services for patients that he was not treating and with whom he had no physician-patient relationship. 

“Health care fraud and kickback schemes are serious public health and safety problems,” said U.S. Attorney Waldref.  “They divert precious public funds away from treating patients, drive up the cost of health care services, and undermine trust in our health care system, often putting quality health care beyond the reach of those who need it the most.  Telemarketing schemes that target and exploit the elderly are especially pernicious because they prey on those who are often most in need of a doctor’s independent judgment that is not tainted or biased by the doctor’s own personal financial interest.” 

“Dr. Bjarke placed making money above the welfare of patients and preyed upon elderly and vulnerable members of the community,” said Richard A. Collodi, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Seattle Field Office. “This conspiracy not only victimized taxpayers via Medicare, but also impacted the patients, who underwent unnecessary medical screenings, thereby affecting their peace of mind. Medicare ultimately paid over $18 million for medically unnecessary testing, a fact that should outrage every law-abiding taxpayer.”

“I am grateful for, and commend, the stellar investigative work on this case performed by HHS OIG and the FBI,” said U.S. Attorney Waldref.  “We will continue to work with our law enforcement partners to make our communities safer and stronger, by aggressively pursuing telemedicine kickback schemes, healthcare fraud, and elder abuse.”

The conspiracy offense carries a maximum sentence of up to five years in federal prison.  The case was investigated by HHS OIG and the FBI.  Assistant United States Attorneys Dan Fruchter and Tyler H.L. Tornabene are prosecuting this case on behalf of the United States.  

Case No. 2:22-cr-00123-RMP


Media briefing on Medicaid tomorrow at 11 a.m.
Oregon Health Authority - 09/27/22 4:33 PM

September 27, 2022

Media contact: Elizabeth Gharst, 971-666-2476, eth.a.gharst@state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@state.or.us

Media briefing on Medicaid tomorrow at 11 a.m.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority officials will host a Zoom media briefing at 11 a.m. tomorrow – Wednesday, September 28 – to discuss updates to the state’s Medicaid program.

Pat Allen, OHA Director, will join Danielle Sobel, Policy and Governmental Affairs Senior Director at the Oregon Primary Care Association, Mercedes Elizalde, Public Policy Director at Central City Concern, Sarah Sullivan, Executive Director at Gorge Grown Food Network representing Oregon Community Food Systems Network, and Erin Fair-Taylor, Vice President of Medicaid Programs at PacificSource to give an update on the state’s Medicaid program, and take questions.

Interested reporters can join via Zoom at this link. A livestream also is available via YouTube at this link.


National Disability Employment Awareness Month events highlight equity in workforce
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/27/22 4:21 PM

(Salem) – The Office of Developmental Disabilities Services (ODDS) is hosting a series of virtual weekly lunch and learn events for the National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM) in October. These events are an opportunity to learn about employment experiences from people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). 

Governor Brown proclaimed October as National Disability Employment Awareness Month. The NDEAM 2022 theme is “Disability: Part of the Equity Equation.” This recognizes the important role people with disabilities have in making the nation’s workforce diverse and inclusive.

“NDEAM observance and these events give us an opportunity to celebrate the successes that Oregonians with I/DD have had in the workforce,” Statewide Employment First Coordinator Acacia McGuire Anderson said. “Each year, more Oregonians with I/DD are finding employment in our communities, which is benefitting both individuals and employers.” 

The NDEAM lunch and learn events will take place on Tuesdays at noon throughout October.

  • October 4 – Celebrating Employment Champions (hybrid event)
    • Join the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services and Central Oregon Employment First to celebrate employment successes in the region. The celebration will include meeting Christian Brigham who used to work in sheltered workshop settings and now works at the Comfort Suites in Redmond, plus award presentations. The in-person portion of this event begins at noon at the Madras Performing Arts Center. Food is provided and resource tables are available. Please RSVP for the in-person event. The online portion of the event begins at 12:30.
  • October 11 – Continuing the Climb
    • This session will involve stories of people that have continued to move forward in their employment journey after they started their first positions. The stories will be told by the people themselves, as well as some of the people that provided along the way.
  • October 18 – Past, Present and Future in Transition
    • Please join us as we hear from three young people sharing about their employment journeys. They will share their goals, dreams and experiences in regard to employment. Each one of them is at a different point of their journey.
  • October 25 – Maintaining Supports While Employed
    • One of the most significant barriers to employment can be the uncertainty around how benefits will be affected by earnings from work. This session will cut through some of the myths and misinformation about how employment affects benefits.

All four events are held online via Zoom with an exception being the October 4 event, which is hybrid. Registration and accessibility information is available on the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) website. These events are hosted by the ODHS, the Oregon Commission for the Blind and the Oregon Department of Education.

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Oregon Health Policy Board meets October 3, via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 09/27/22 3:55 PM

September 27, 2022

Contacts: Liz Gharst, 971-666-2476, eth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us">Elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Policy Board meets October 3, via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: October 3rd – 8:30 am – 12:00 pm

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line.

To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1604737337?pwd=WEJFeWJick9oVCsrT0RwcjEwaWdWZz09

To call in to the meeting on a mobile device, use the following number:

+16692545252,, 1604737337#,,,,,,0#,, 136235#

Proposed topics for the meeting agenda are listed below. The final meeting agenda and supporting materials will be posted on the OHPB website prior to the meeting. 

Agenda:

Agenda and meeting materials will be uploaded to the website prior to the October 3rd meeting, to find materials please follow the link below

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/OHPB-meetings.aspx

To provide public comment, please submit your request for public comment at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/OHPB-Public-Comment

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/index.aspx

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (Communication Access Real-time Translation)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


$913,000 in grants for nonprofits and insurance agents to help Oregonians with health coverage enrollment
Oregon Health Authority - 09/27/22 2:33 PM

September 27, 2022  

Media contact: Amy Coven, 503-943-0164, amy.coven2@dhsoha.state.or.us

$913,000 in grants for nonprofits and insurance agents to help Oregonians with health coverage enrollment

(Salem) – Figuring out health insurance was complicated, even before facing a global pandemic. To help Oregonians sort through health insurance plans and programs, the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace has awarded grants to nonprofit community groups and insurance agents.

“Choosing the best health plan can be a daunting process,” said Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. “Applying for health coverage and financial help and then sorting through plan options can be stressful. Insurance agents and community partners throughout the state are available to take the stress out of the process and help Oregonians enroll in the best coverage for their situation.”

The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace runs OregonHealthCare.gov and helps people get insurance when they do not have coverage available through work and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan, Medicare or another program.

“Everyone in Oregon should have access to the high-quality coverage that works for their health needs,” said Flowers. “Insurance agents and community partners can help you figure out the programs, plans, and financial help available to make insurance more affordable for you.”

Grants totaling $913,000 will be awarded to 14 community groups and 29 insurance agents. Awardees use these grants to spread awareness of the upcoming Marketplace health insurance open enrollment period, and to help Oregonians enroll in coverage through the Marketplace.

For many people, open enrollment is the only time of the year to sign up for a private health plan or switch plans. Open enrollment will run from Nov. 1 through Jan. 15 for health coverage for 2023.

Grantees were judged on multiple criteria, including their demonstrated ties to community networks, ability to reach underserved populations, and capacity to serve consumers whether they are eligible for HealthCare.gov plans or other programs, such as the Oregon Health Plan or Medicare. Grantees represent and serve Oregon’s diverse populations and offer services in multiple languages, including Arabic, Asian languages, Russian, and Spanish.

Community partner groups who will receive grants are:

  • ADAPT Integrated Health Care, Roseburg
  • Asian Health & Service Center, Portland
  • Cascade AIDS Project, Portland
  • Centro Latino Americano, Eugene
  • Grand Ronde Tribal Health Clinic, Grand Ronde
  • Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization, Portland
  • Interface Network, Salem
  • Mosaic Medical, Bend
  • Northeast Oregon Network, La Grande
  • One Community Health, The Dalles
  • Project Access Now (PANOW), Portland
  • Unete Center for Farmworker Advocacy, Medford
  • Urban League of Portland, Portland
  • Waterfall Community Health Center, North Bend

Insurance agents – also called partner agents – who will receive grants are:

  • Aaron Michael Burns Insurance Services, Eugene
  • Abel Insurance, Coos Bay, Florence, Gold Beach, and Newport
  • Bancorp Insurance, La Pine
  • Boone Insurance Associates, Eugene
  • Country Financial, Sisters
  • FG Insurance, Forest Grove and Portland
  • Gordon Wood Insurance, Roseburg
  • Grace Insurance Services, Portland
  • HE Cross Company, Portland
  • Health Plans in Oregon, Portland
  • HealthMarkets Insurance, Canby
  • Healthwise Insurance Planning, Portland
  • Healthy, Wealthy & Wise, Tigard
  • High Desert Insurance, Bend
  • Hillock Insurance Agency, Enterprise
  • iCover Oregon, Albany
  • Insurance By Design, Wilsonville
  • Insurance Marketplace, Medford
  • K Insurance Group, Independence
  • Klamath Insurance Center, Klamath Falls
  • Linda Dugan Insurance, Astoria
  • Matthew Woodbridge Insurance, Salem and Woodburn
  • Premier NW Insurance, Oregon City, Salem, and Sandy
  • RJS & Associates, Philomath
  • Shanon Saldivar Insurance, Hood River and The Dalles
  • Thippayaphorn Om Sukheenai, Newberg
  • Tomlin Health Insurance, Eugene
  • Valley Insurance, La Grande

To make an appointment with a partner or agent, go to OregonHealthCare.gov/GetHelp or call 855-268-3767 (toll-free).

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov. For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.


Oregon PUC Approves Revised Rules to Better Protect Customers at Risk of Utility Service Disconnection
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 09/27/22 1:37 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) recently approved rule revisions intended to strengthen protections for low-income energy customers at risk of service disconnection due to nonpayment. These rules are specific to Oregon’s investor-owned energy utilities, including Portland General Electric, PacifiCorp, Idaho Power, NW Natural, Cascade Natural, and Avista. The PUC approved the following:

  • Changes to the rule defining disconnection of service to ensure vulnerable populations are protected 
  • Adjustments to the language defining what actions a utility has to take before disconnecting a customer that offers to pay cash at the door
  • Waiving select charges for low-income customers
  • Extension of the period of time required to notify customers of a disconnection of service due to nonpayment 

Disconnection of Service -- The PUC approved changes to the rule to postpone the disconnection of service any time a temperature of less than 32 degrees is forecasted during the colder months of November through March or when a winter storm warning is in effect. The previous rule required a pause in disconnection only if a high temperature of less than 32 degrees was forecasted, which did not take into account very cold days that may have a high that reaches 32 degrees. The rule now also indicates utilities are unable to disconnect service for nonpayment when a customer is under certain wildfire evacuation notices and when the air quality index is at or above 100. Utilities can now only disconnect service between the hours of 8 a.m. and 2 p.m. to allow for same-day reconnection of service for customers.

Paying Outstanding Bills to Avoid Disconnection – The previous rule allowed energy utilities, when arriving at a home to disconnect service due to an outstanding bill, to collect a reasonable partial payment of the overdue balance at the door to prevent disconnection. The rule now requires that any energy utility with a policy not to accept payment at the door be required to notify customers of the options available to pay the outstanding balance and be provided at least 24 hours to make the payment.

Waiving Select Charges for Low-Income Customers – The PUC approved changes to the rule to prohibit utilities from imposing late payment charges and collecting deposits. Additionally, select reconnection fees will also now be waived for qualifying low-income customers.

Disconnection Notice Extension – Utility customers at risk of disconnection are now required to receive notification from their utility service provider at least 20 days in advance of a disconnect. This change to the rule provides customers more time to prepare for a pending disconnection and ability to pay the outstanding balance to avoid disconnection. 

“We appreciate the efforts of PUC Staff, utilities, and stakeholders who were very involved in the process of updating these rules,” noted Mark Thompson, PUC Commissioner. “This is a good step forward in improving the protections that are afforded customers experiencing financial and other difficulties. These updates reflect the need to change business as usual to better recognize the fact that people rely on their utility services to sustain life, while still providing for an orderly way to terminate services only where that becomes absolutely necessary.”

Customers with questions about billing or utility service can contact the PUC’s Consumer Services Team at 800-522-2404 or puc.consumer@puc.oregon.gov

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The PUC regulates customer rates and services of the state’s investor-owned electric and natural gas utilities, including Portland General Electric, Idaho Power, Pacific Power, Avista, Cascade Natural, and NW Natural. The PUC also regulates landline telephone providers and select water companies. The PUC’s mission is to ensure Oregonians have access to safe, reliable, and fairly priced utility services that advance state policy and promote the public interest. We use an inclusive process to evaluate differing viewpoints and visions of the public interest and arrive at balanced, well-reasoned, independent decisions supported by fact and law. For more information about the PUC, visit oregon.gov/puc            


Support a National Call to Action for Truth and Reconciliation on the impacts of Indian Boarding Schools by wearing an orange shirt on Sept. 30
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/27/22 1:34 PM

(Salem) – Orange Shirt Day on Sept. 30, 2022 is a day for truth and reconciliation on the impacts of the Indian Boarding School system. It opens the door for a global conversation about all aspects of the Indian boarding school system and how it forced Indigenous populations to lose their cultural identities. It is an opportunity to create meaningful discussion about the effects of these schools and the legacy they have left behind.

Staff at the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) will be wearing orange to honor the survivors and victims of the federal Indian Boarding School System. ODHS’ commitment to dismantling all forms of systemic racism is led by reconciliation and collaboration with all Tribal communities within Oregon and is strengthened by our Equity North Star, which is our agency wide vision that leads to a more equitable Oregon for all. 

“Orange Shirt Day represents an Indigenous movement throughout the United States and Canada,” said Adam Becenti, ODHS Office of Tribal Affairs Director. “Orange Shirt Day is a call to action, but more importantly is an opportunity to honor the lives that were lost and those who survived this atrocity.”

“We will be wearing orange to honor the survivors and victims of the Indian Boarding School system and to recognize the trauma it caused for generations of Tribal families and children,” said Rebecca Jones Gaston, ODHS Child Welfare Director. “In Oregon our Child Welfare Division’s Vision for Transformation commits us to dismantling the structures, underlying mindsets, and biases that contribute to racialized and disparate outcomes for Tribal children and families. We honor the sovereignty and self-determination of the Nine Tribes of Oregon and are committed to reconciliation, healing and government-to-government collaboration when working with Oregon Tribes to support the needs of Tribal children and their families.”

According to the U.S. Department of the Interior’s 2022 investigation report, between 1819 and 1969, the federal Indian boarding school system operated more than 400 schools across 37 states or then-territories. During this time thousands of Indigenous children were separated from their families and placed in the school system, many did not survive. The investigation identified marked and unmarked burial sites at approximately 53 different schools across the school system. 

The federal Indian boarding school system deployed systematic militarized and identity-alteration methodologies in an attempt to assimilate American Indian and Alaska Native children through education, including but not limited to renaming Tribal children English names; cutting the hair of Tribal children; discouraging or preventing the use of Tribal languages, religions and cultural practices; and organizing children into units to perform military drills.

As early as 1874, a boarding school was built at Warm Springs in Oregon, and others were later constructed at Siletz, Grand Ronde, Klamath, and Umatilla. Today, Chemawa Indian School, located in Salem, Oregon is an accredited high school that serves American Indian and Alaska Native students. Chemawa is the oldest continuously operated off-reservation boarding school in the United States.

About the ODHS Office Tribal Affairs 

The Office of Tribal Affairs within the ODHS Director’s Office is a team committed to all Oregon Tribal communities thriving mentally, physically, spiritually, and emotionally. Tribal Affairs works with all five ODHS programs to create and provide Tribally appropriate programming, services, policies and support. Through Tribal consultation with Nine Federally Recognized Tribes of Oregon, O​DHS ensures programming, services, and policies meet the needs of Oregon Tribal communities. 

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The Oregon Historical Society's Research Library Resumes Pre-Pandemic Hours; Now Open to the Public Five Days A Week, No Appointment Needed (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 09/27/22 1:07 PM
Photo by Andie Petkus
Photo by Andie Petkus
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/2861/157834/thumb_OHSLibrary22-393.jpg

Portland, OR — September 27, 2022 — The Oregon Historical Society is pleased to announce that its research library resumes pre-pandemic hours on Tuesday, September 27. While appointments have been required to visit the library’s downtown reading room to promote social distancing, researchers are now welcome to visit the library on Tuesdays from 1pm to 5pm and Wednesdays through Saturdays from 10am to 5pm, no appointment needed. 

The Oregon Historical Society’s research library is an invaluable resource for learning about the past and providing context on the present. The library preserves the world’s largest collection of Oregon-related materials, documenting the people, places, and events that have shaped Oregon’s history. All are welcome to visit the library, both in the newly renovated reading room and online through OHS’s digital collections and digital history resources.

“Through a multi-year renovation and a global pandemic, OHS’s library staff have continued to serve researchers and make our collections accessible through remote services and individual appointments,” said OHS Library Director Shawna Gandy. “After nearly three years, we are excited to once again resume regular hours and open our doors to curious researchers from around the world looking to our collections to gain knowledge and perspective.”

Renovated in 2021, the new library space features a modernized reading room, with enhancements for researchers including a reconfigured reference desk, a viewing station for maps and architectural plans, a tech hub, and physical improvements that promote accessibility and inclusion for all users. A highlight of the new space is the Pietro Belluschi Architectural Resource Center, which provides a focal point to highlight the library’s architectural collections and a well-equipped meeting space for instruction.

OHS’s expert librarians and archivists are eager to support researchers of all types and skill levels. There is no cost to visit the library, which is located on the fourth floor of the Oregon Historical Society (1200 SW Park Avenue, Portland, 97205). While appointments are not required, researchers are encouraged to contact the library in advance to be sure the materials they need are on site during their visit. Visit OHS’s website for more tips on how to make the most of a visit to OHS’s research library. 


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view. 




Attached Media Files: Photo by Andie Petkus , Photo by Andie Petkus , Photo by Andie Petkus , Photo by Andie Petkus , Photo by Andie Petkus , Photo by Andie Petkus , Photo by Andie Petkus , Photo by Andie Petkus

OSP Traffic Stop leads to arrest and illegal drugs off the street- Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/27/22 12:25 PM
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On September 2, 2022, around 5:00 P.M., an OSP Trooper stopped a vehicle for a traffic violation in Clackamas. During the traffic stop, the driver displayed signs of impairment and after a subsequent investigation was taken into custody for DUII. The driver identified as Thomas James Freeman (37) of Portland was detained by his Probation Officer. During a search of the vehicle, the Trooper noted several signs of recent drug activity along with locating a loaded pistol. The vehicle was seized and searched on probable cause and exigent circumstances. The vehicle and several lock boxes seized from inside were taken as evidence, pending a search warrant application. 

The search warrants were served on September 14, 2022, and the following items were seized.

  • 3946.25 Grams Methamphetamine
  • 42.9 Grams Psilocybin
  • $14,131 US Currency
  • 10 Guns
  • 6 unknown pills

This is an ongoing investigation with no further information being released.

OSP Troopers were assisted during the investigation by Detectives from the OSP-Criminal Investigations Division-Drug Enforcement Section (Domestic Highway Enforcement Initiative) and the Major Crimes Section.        

The Oregon State Police-Domestic Highway Enforcement Initiative is supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA).

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates with and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement initiatives, including the OSP-DHE Initiative.    




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/1002/157832/HIDTA_22233745.jpg

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds public meetings in October
Oregon Health Authority - 09/27/22 11:30 AM

September 27, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds public meetings in October

What: Public meetings of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: The council will discuss next steps following the establishment of BHRNs. Agendas will be posted on the Oversight and Accountability Council web page prior to each meeting.

When/Where:

Virtual meetings are Wednesdays from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Oct. 5 – https://youtu.be/lw3MWMQsH6Y

Oct. 12 – https://youtu.be/P3uwwrNHRNA

Oct. 19 – https://youtu.be/Fd0c1k_Desk

Oct. 26 - https://youtu.be/PoZV5ulnkHw

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or roll@dhsoha.state.or.us">jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

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Pacific Power Incentives Charge Customers' Shift to EVs as National Drive Electric Week Approaches
Pacific Power - 09/27/22 10:35 AM

Electric vehicle charging equipment rebates, power cost discounts, and infrastructure investments reduce barriers to adoption 

PORTLAND, OR—September 27—Pacific Power is supporting customers making the shift to electric vehicles with valuable incentives as National Drive Electric Week approaches.  

Drivers looking to go gas-free can access discounts on the price of electricity for vehicle charging, newly available home charging equipment rebates, and a larger array of EV infrastructure across the Pacific Power service territory.  

“When you look over the life of a car, the total cost of ownership is now lower for an EV than a gas-powered vehicle," said Kate Hawley, Senior Product Manager at Pacific Power.  

Drivers electrifying their vehicles can take advantage of the following incentives: 

  • Residential Pacific Power customers can get $500 to $1,000 toward installing an at-home charger, depending on income level 
  • Business and multifamily property owners (apartment complexes) can get up to $3,000 per port 
  • We also offer EV drivers deep discounts in the way they pay for electricity through an incentive called Time of Use. 

We’re also investing big dollars in electric vehicle mobility for Oregon communities, especially in underserved and rural regions  — more than $2.5 million to date. Pacific Power E-Mobility Grants have helped communities purchase e-bikes in Corvallis, electric tractors in Prineville, an electric school bus in Bend, an EV and charger for a health clinic in Portland. We’ve also installed fast charging stations in Bend, Klamath Falls, Madras, Otis, and Mill City. 

"With our work in expanding our service territory’s charging infrastructure, we are making EV ownership and operation more accessible to customers,” Hawley said.  

How much would going electric save you? See what savings are available in your area based on your average mileage, energy use, budget and rebate availability with our WattPlan tool at pacificpower.wattplan.com/ev . 

National Drive Electric Week raises awareness of the benefits of electric and hybrid vehicles including trucks, motorcycles, and cars. The 12th annual celebration takes place September 23–October 2, 2022. It is organized by Plug In America, Electric Vehicle Association, Sierra Club, and EVHybridNoire. 

 

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About Pacific Power

Pacific Power provides safe and reliable electric service to more than 764,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company supplies customers with electricity from a diverse portfolio of generating plants including hydroelectric, thermal, wind, geothermal and solar resources. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with 2 million customers in six western states. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.


People with disabilities and older adults can, and should, take concrete steps to prepare before the next disaster for a better recovery
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/27/22 10:24 AM

Note: This press release is available in Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, Somali, Arabic, Chuukese, Korean, Hmong, Marshallese, Portuguese, Simplified Chinese, Tagalog, Traditional Chinese and American Sign Language online here.

(Salem, Ore.) – “From a house fire to major earthquakes, taking simple steps to be prepared can be the difference between survival and recovery from a disaster,” said Ed Flick, director of the Oregon Department of Human Services’ Office of Resilience and Emergency Management. “Unfortunately, older adults, people with disabilities, and those on fixed incomes are the ones we often read about who weren’t able to prepare for emergencies or evacuate. We aim to change that as soon as possible.”

The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) joins the national observation of Preparedness Month during September by encouraging older adults and people with disabilities to prepare for disasters. 

LeAnn Ivers is the Co-chair of Disability Emergency Management Advisory Council (DEMAC). She’s also hard of hearing and experiencing vision loss. Those lived experiences, and her time on the DEMAC, have taught her that people don’t understand that emergency responders won’t be as available during a large casualty situation. “We all need to prepare as if no one is coming to rescue us,” says Ivers. “We can take control by creating our own plan and how we respond to disasters.”

Ivers recommends these tips for older adults and people with disabilities, although many are relevant to everyone:

  • If you have access and functional needs and are in an area preparing for possible evacuation, consider evacuating early, instead of waiting until your area is at level three, the “go” level. Medical needs, transportation challenges and more can make it hard to get out at the last minute.
  • Have extra supplies for your specific medical conditions, such as special diets, durable medical equipment, batteries, oxygen, catheters, extra eyeglasses and hearing aid batteries. 
  • Also prepare extra supplies for your service animal.
  • Keep your prescriptions and essential over-the-counter medication handy, as well as contact information for your medical providers. Build up an emergency supply of prescriptions by ordering as soon as you can each time and check with your insurance company to explore emergency supply options. Be aware of potential hazards in the area and sign up for emergency alerts.
  • Be “2 Weeks Ready” with at least two weeks’ worth of food, water and critical supplies. Learn how to assemble an emergency supply kit at Ready.gov or American Red Cross. “Putting together these supplies does not have to be accomplished all at once or at a high cost,” Ivers said. “A helpful way to accumulate these supplies can be to simply add one or two of the items into your shopping and then reserve the extra items for your emergency kit.” 
  • Reach out to your local support groups or others in your community who have gone through emergencies to learn from their experience.
  • Get to know your neighbors. Even if you have family, your neighbors will be the first ones available to help. 
  • If you have an older adult or person with a disability in your neighborhood, get to know them and how you can help in an emergency.

“Each person’s needs are unique to their circumstances, so it’s important that each of us create our own plan to ensure we are ready and can take quick action in a disaster,” Flick said. “ODHS is committed to helping people be prepared and ready for the next disaster.

About the DEMAC:  The Disability Emergency Management Advisory Council was created to apply the experiences and knowledge of people with disabilities, as subject matter experts, to guide statewide emergency management in developing and implementing inclusive practices through all planning, response, and recovery activities. The DEMAC is jointly funded by the Oregon Department of Emergency Management, ODHS, and the Oregon Health Authority.

About ODHS and disasters:  Oregon’s emergency and recovery plans give ODHS responsibility to support impacted individuals and families during emergencies and recovery, at the request of and in partnership with local and tribal governments. This is in keeping with the agency’s primary role to assist people in meeting their basic needs while moving toward independence.  

The ODHS Office of Resilience and Emergency Management (OREM) focuses on the needs of people before, during and after disasters, reducing disaster impacts in times of crisis and investing in communities year-round to ensure greater resilience. OREM carries out ODHS’ roles in Oregon’s Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan as the primary agency for mass care, food and water in disaster situations and social services during recovery, and coordinates efforts among local and Tribal governments and nongovernmental organizations. The office centers equity in its work, ensuring that the goals and needs of vulnerable communities directly inform resilience plans and that response systems effectively address disproportionate disaster impacts. OREM also assists other ODHS programs in preventing, mitigating, responding to and recovering from natural, technical and human-caused hazards.    

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Attached Media Files: Ed Flick audio quote

Public Health Advisory Board meets Oct. 13
Oregon Health Authority - 09/27/22 9:10 AM

September 27, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets Oct. 13

What: The Public Health Advisory Board will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Approve September meeting minutes; discuss PHAB subcommittees; review Strategic Data Plan subcommittee charter; review PHAB charter and bylaws; discuss prioritization for public health modernization funding in the 2023-25 biennium.

When: Thursday, Oct. 13, 3-5:30 pm. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1602414019?pwd=MWtPYm5YWmxyRnVzZW0vZkpUV0lEdz09 or conference call:

(669) 254-5252, participant code 1602414019#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom: at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or lichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us">publichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Interested in a Career as a Police Officer or Correctional Officer?
Benton-Franklin Workforce Development Council - 09/27/22 8:57 AM

Are you interested in a becoming a Police Officer or Correctional Officer? These are growing career fields with great pay and benefits. You won’t want to miss this opportunity!

 

Join us for this hiring event on Wednesday, October 12, 2022, from 10am-2pm at the Richland Library, located at 955 Northgate Drive Richland, WA 99352.

 

Human Resources team members, recruiters, local police, and correctional officers will be available to assist you with the application process and answer any questions you have. You can also learn more about the process to become a Police Officer or Correctional Officer. 

 

If you’re interested in Police or Correctional Officer careers, these agencies are looking for you:

  • City of Kennewick, Richland, and Pasco Police Departments
  • Benton and Franklin County Sheriff’s Offices
  • Two River Correctional Institute (Umatilla, OR)
  • Coyote Ridge Correction Center (Connell, WA)
  • Washington State Patrol



Attached Media Files: 2022-09/6679/157813/Police_Hiring_Event_8.5x11.pdf

Mon. 09/26/22
Center Parkway Street Extension Groundbreaking on Wednesday (Photo)
City of Richland - 09/26/22 4:20 PM
2022-09/5957/157803/Invitation_1920x1080_(1).png
2022-09/5957/157803/Invitation_1920x1080_(1).png
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The long-awaited Center Parkway North Extension, connecting Tapteal Drive with Gage Boulevard begins. The groundbreaking event is scheduled on Wednesday, September 28, at 11:00 a.m. at 1970 Center Parkway, off Tapteal Drive near Holiday Inn Express & Suites. When completed, the project will include a three-lane roadway with bike lanes, curb, gutter, and sidewalks on both sides of the street, and a signalized/gated at-grade railroad crossing of the Port of Benton rail crossing. The completed project will improve connectivity in the retail service area of Richland and the entire Tri-Cities.

Premier Excavation of Pasco is removing current infrastructure including the now vacant  Mail by the Mall building and will begin roadway preparation next week. The project is tentatively planned for completion by the end of 2022. Partners include the Cities of Richland and Kennewick, Port of Benton, Port of Kennewick, the Washington State Transportation Improvement Board, Benton County, and the Benton Franklin Council of Governments. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/5957/157803/Invitation_1920x1080_(1).png

System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely Tuesday, October 4
Oregon Health Authority - 09/26/22 4:08 PM

September 26, 2022 

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,  

timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov 

Program contact: Anna Williams, 971-720-9654, anna.k.williams@dhsoha.state.or.us 

System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely Tuesday, October 4

What: A regular public meeting of the System of Care Advisory Council 

When: Tuesday October 4, 12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

Where: By webinar at ZoomGov 

Meeting ID: 160 347 3675, Passcode: 123456 

Dial by your location +1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose) 

Agenda: The full agenda can be found at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HSD/BH-Child-Family/Pages/SOCAC.aspx. The meeting will include time for public comment. 

Details: Senate Bill 1 (2019) established a Governor-appointed System of Care Advisory Council to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of the state and local continuum of care that provides services to youth and young adults.  

Primarily the Council will be reviewing the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion statement for the System of Care Advisory Council and the Council’s report to the Legislature due September 15, 2022. 

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide: 

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Christy Hudson at 971-678-4347, 711 TTY, or christy.j.hudson@state.or.us at least two business days before the meeting. 

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Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/26/22 1:59 PM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Julian H. Combs, died the morning of September 26, 2022. Combs was incarcerated at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) in Ontario and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified. 

Combs entered DOC custody on April 3, 2012, from Lincoln County with no parole date. Combs was 84 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 12,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 12 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 adults in custody. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, individuals with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

 

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Attached Media Files: Julian H. Combs

New grants from Pacific Power concentrate on education and STEM learning
Pacific Power - 09/26/22 1:07 PM

Funding supports the work of local community organizations that facilitate learning opportunities 

 

PORTLAND, Ore. (Sept. 26, 2022) — Research shows that learning happens best when social, emotional and cognitive growth are connected. High-quality, evidence-based programs are also critical  to positive academic outcomes, better attendance and improved graduation rates. That’s why Pacific Power puts funding and resources behind schools and organizations that work toward these goals and open the doors of opportunity for learners of all ages.

 

The Pacific Power Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, is donating more than $300,000 in new grant funding across the three states it serves to support organizations that provide education and STEM learning opportunities. From financial literacy classes and early educational intervention programs to last-minute childcare centers that can help parents attend a job interview or work an extra shift, the grants underwrite a wide variety of much needed and helpful resources in large and small communities.

 

“These organizations are seeing the needs and doing the important work of supporting families and community members,” said Stefan Bird, president and CEO, Pacific Power. “It is an honor to augment their work and to know the charitable investments of Pacific Power are building resiliency and boosting the growth and vitality of the communities we serve.” 

 

The latest round of education grants aligns closely with the priorities Pacific Power places on enhancing access and availability of STEM programs, especially to underserved populations, and learning supports for youth and adults both inside and outside of the classroom. These education and STEM grants are one of four grant cycles offered by the foundation annually.

 

The following grants were given to 87 local organizations supporting communities in Oregon, Washington and Northern California:

 

Oregon

Portland area

Big Brothers Big Sisters Columbia Northwest for fun, interactive STEM kits for mentors to use virtually or in-person with youth to help improve academic performance and their potential for a brighter future.

Black United Fund of Oregon to help provide scholarships that support education, equity and the promise of a brighter future for students in underserved communities.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metropolitan Area for staff training and supplies to help provide hands-on STEM programs that engage and inspire underserved children to consider STEM careers.

Carpe Mundi to provide study-abroad scholarships and year-long mentorships for low-income, first-generation college students to help them reach their full potential through international learning experiences. 

College Possible to support the College Access Program at McDaniel High School that helps historically underserved students get into college and persist through graduation by providing recent college graduates as coaches. 

De La Salle North Catholic High School for the financial aid program at the only college preparatory high school in the Portland area dedicated to serving low-income students. 

FACT Oregon to fund the support line that connects families of youth with disabilities to information and peer support to help navigate special education services.

First Book Portland to distribute new books, including books by authors of color, to economically disadvantaged families to help nurture literacy, a love of reading and a solid educational foundation. 

Friends of Baseball to support the Full Count RBI Academy, an after-school program that combines baseball with academic support and social skills-building for youth from low-income backgrounds and youth of color. 

Friends of the Children—Portland for snacks, supplies and personalized items to support mentoring and skill-building activities for underserved children in grades 6-12. 

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest to support the “Eureka!” five-year STEM mentorship program for girls in grades 8-12 that offers hands-on lessons, activities, field trips, internships, job shadows, guest lectures and workshops to help students learn about STEM college and career options. 

Greater Than for scholarships and case management to support college-age students, who have been involved with the program since third grade, and help them navigate post-secondary plans and career opportunities. 

INCIGHT to expand programming to help high school students with disabilities explore careers and obtain job skills training. 

Jin Ren to provide targeted academic support to historically underserved students in the Albina Mandarin Immersion Program at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. School and Harriet Tubman Middle School.

My Father’s House to support The Journey, an on-the-job training and skill-building program for homeless mothers and fathers to help them successfully transition into the workforce. 

Oregon Robotics Tournament and Outreach Program for support of robotics teams in grades 4-12, including underserved and marginalized communities, to nurture interest in STEM concepts and careers.

Portland Rose Festival Foundation to support internships for college students, including past Rose Festival Court Princesses, providing professional work experience at a nonprofit. 

Portland Workforce Alliance for virtual and in-person employer visits to help high school students explore careers, develop post-graduation plans and find their footing in a rapidly changing economy. 

Reading Results to support intensive reading intervention through trained tutors to help early grade readers, who are living on low incomes and/or students of color, reach critical third-grade benchmarks. 

Renewable Energy Scholarship Foundation to provide a scholarship to an undergraduate or graduate student who is studying renewable energy and is either from or attending a school in the Pacific Power service area. 

St. Andrew Nativity School to support the STEM program at this tuition-free private middle school for students whose families live at or below the poverty line. 

Salvation Army West Women’s and Children’s Shelter to help provide internet service, laptops and other equipment for workforce and career development for residents in the domestic violence shelter. 

Samoa Pacific Development Corporation to support the Pacific Islander Youth Engagement Initiative that provides after-school mentoring for Pacific Islander high school students in the Portland area, supporting educational success and cultural preservation. 

Schoolhouse Supplies for the Tools for Schools Program that puts back-to-school supply kits in the hands of students in need. 

SMART Reading to buy books and support programs for PreK-3rd graders to promote early literacy. 

Youth, Rights & Justice for the SchoolWorks program that aims to disrupt the school to prison pipeline by advocating for youth involved in the Multnomah County juvenile justice system to ensure they are receiving education. 

Willamette Valley

Boys & Girls Club of Corvallis to support teens in grades 10-12 to help them prepare for the workforce, explore careers and graduate on time. 

Corvallis Public Schools Foundation to support the Students Advocating for Equity (SAFE) summer program for students who identify as Black, Indigenous or persons of color, which helps build community, supports mental health and teaches new skills to deal with racial inequities. 

Mid-Valley STEM-CTE Hub to support early-childhood STEAM education by collaborating with early childhood education providers and families in Linn and Benton Counties to provide professional development, training and resources. 

Ophelia’s Place for prevention-focused behavioral health services, including Girls Empowerment Groups, for girls ages 10-18 in Albany and Junction City.

Oregon State University Foundation for the Pacific Power Scholars Program that provides scholarship awards for undergraduate students in OSU’s College of Engineering School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. 

People Sustaining Kings Valley to provide professional development for teachers and staff in Benton and Polk counties.

Scio School District for the Scio Youth Development program to assist and expand the community wrestling program that teaches children responsibility, respect, discipline and the importance of education. 

Stayton Public Library Foundation to support the Dolly Parton Imagination Library, which mails free, high-quality, age-appropriate books to preschool children every month, for the first five years of their life, to help build early literacy skills. 

Willamette University to provide Pacific Power Foundation scholarships for two students from low-income and historically underserved communities who are pursuing undergraduate degrees in STEM fields. 

Umpqua Valley

Boys & Girls Club of the Umpqua Valley for keyboards, USB camera adaptors and other technology equipment to enhance the quality of STEAM after-school programs.

Canyonville Community Library to help the library make building improvements to better serve the public as it reopens after being closed for two years due to the pandemic. 

Oregon STEM to support this web-based tool that helps make students aware of STEM career paths by connecting them through virtual tours, presentations, discussions and other real-time interactions with thousands of STEM professionals all over the country. 

Rogue Valley 

Boys & Girls Clubs of the Rogue Valley to support STEAM-based, after-school enrichment programs that help students stay on track for academic success. 

Britt Music and Arts Festival to support music residencies at Britt that provide music education to the southern Oregon region and connect students with professional teaching artists. 

National Inventors Hall of Fame for scholarship assistance for Camp Invention®, which provides engaging, hands-on STEM programs for students through 6th grade in Jackson and Klamath counties. 

Project Youth+ to provide student enrichment activities and summer camp with hands-on STEM activities for youth from low-income backgrounds. 

Rogue Valley Mentoring to support the in-school mentoring program for Talent Middle School students. 

Roots and Wings Community Preschool to provide tuition help for the young families enrolled in the Equitable Education and Care Program.

Sacred Heart Catholic School to support the K-8 Spanish-language program by adding an online curriculum to support both English-Language Learners and students learning Spanish as a second language. 

Soroptimist International of River Valley to provide scholarships to three young women pursuing advanced education at Rogue Community College. 

Wildlife Images Rehabilitation and Education Center to help create new educational programs for youth during the school year, including programs for homeschool students, preschoolers, Scouts and overnighters. 

Winston Area Community Partnership to replace seating for the Teen Center in order to provide a welcoming, safe place for local youth. 

Klamath Falls

Crater Lake Council Boy Scouts of America for cabin repairs at Camp McLoughlin to ensure a safe camping experience where youth can learn about nature and develop personal skills.

Friends of the Children—Klamath Basin to provide research-based mentoring for at-risk youth in grades K-12 as well as their caregivers through a two-generation approach. 

Friends of the Mentor Program to support the Lake County Youth Mentor Program that connects youth in grades K-12 with caring adult mentors to enhance both academic and personal achievement, as well as scholarships for sports, dance and other extracurricular activities. 

Henley High School Engineering and Robotics for scholarships to help local students design and build wind turbines and compete at the KidWind National Engineering Competition. 

Klamath County Rotary Club to support Klamath Cares, Klamath Reads, an annual celebration of early literacy that provides books to first grade students in Klamath County.

Malin Elementary School for an updated playground structure to provide a safe place for students in grades K-6 to play, explore and be physically active. 

National Inventors Hall of Fame for scholarship assistance for Camp Invention, which provides engaging, hands-on STEM programs for students through grade 6 in Jackson and Klamath counties. 

Oregon Tech Foundation for Pacific Power Foundation Scholarships to support students at Oregon Institute of Technology pursuing degrees in renewable energy engineering or electrical engineering. 

Portland State University Foundation to support Oregon MESA STEM programs at six middle school and high school chapters in Southern Oregon. 

Northern Coast

Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation for the “20/20 Vision” School Vision Screening program for students in Lincoln County and follow-up referrals for low-cost services to those who need them. 

Seaside AAUW Scholarship Foundation to help provide college scholarships for young women, including first-generation college students, communities of color and low-income households. 

Warrenton Middle School to help students design and build a community outdoor activity space, including a walking/bike path and disc golf course with interpretive signs that share regional history, and also for a STEM summer camp where students engage in hands-on activities involving robots, drones and remotely operated underwater vehicles. 

Southern Coast 

Coos Watershed Association for the Life Cycle Monitoring Internship Program that surveys and samples Oregon Coast Coho salmon. 

The Lighthouse School for microscopes and other materials to support hands-on science learning for K-8 students. 

Central Oregon

Boys & Girls Clubs of Bend to support Project Learn, a holistic program supporting social-emotional learning and academic enrichment, including hands-on activities, for K-12 students.

Camp Fire Central Oregon to help teens in grades 7-12 build leadership and job skills as they progress through SummerKids Youth Leadership, Counselor in Training and Junior Counselor Internships.

EarthWin to support the EarthWinTM Challenge that gives Oregon middle and high school student groups a STEAM-based platform to develop inclusive, collaborative projects that help build a sustainable future. 

Family Access Network for advocate services for disadvantaged children and their families in Crook County to help provide school supplies, clothing and access to food, transportation and other resources. 

Financial Beginnings Oregon to provide free financial literacy training to hundreds of Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson county residents, with an emphasis on including low-income and other historically disenfranchised communities. 

Oregon State University Foundation to provide scholarships for undergraduate Pacific Power Scholars at OSU’s Cascades Campus studying Energy Systems Engineering.

Tower Theatre Foundation to support performances of Tower Theatre’s LessonPLAN educational series  that inspires creativity in K-12 students. 

Eastern Oregon

City of Pendleton for coding robotics and other STEM-related materials to enhance the Library of Things at the Pendleton Public Library. 

Enterprise Education Foundation for the renovation of the Enterprise Elementary playground so preschool and elementary students of all abilities can enjoy an outdoor play experience that is safe, developmentally appropriate and inclusive.

Pendleton Children’s Center to install a fire-suppression system as part of a renovation and expansion of the facility to provide safe childcare services to more families. 

Pilot Rock Fire District for training and equipment, including CPR manikins and face masks, to help teach first aid and emergency response skills to first responders and community members. 

California

Ore-Cal Resource Conservation and Development Area Council to help over 600 K-8 students from Siskiyou, Modoc and Trinity attend “How to Be a Biologist” STEM summer camp and inspire them to consider STEM careers. 

Washington

Clark College Foundation for the Pacific Power STEM Scholarship fund to help increase the number of high school students from diverse populations enrolled in STEM programs at Clark College. 

Early Life Speech & Language to help provide no-cost, intensive, individualized therapy to children ages 2 to 7 who have speech and language delays and help them succeed at home, at school and in life. 

FIRST Washington for after-school and in-classroom FIRST robotics programs to help Yakima County youth develop science, technology, engineering and math skills as they compete on robotics teams.

Fort Vancouver Regional Library Foundation for AWE Learning Workstations, portable tablets that provide preschool and young children a fun, safe, interactive learning experience to help them learn to read and participate in science, technology, reading, engineering and math lessons.

Heritage University to provide STEM scholarships for five students at this university, rooted in the homeland of the Yakama Nation that is home to a multicultural student community. 

Junior Achievement of Washington to support financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship programs for middle school students in Walla Walla County.

Lewis & Clark Middle School for shoes, coats and other clothing, as well as other supplies, to meet the urgent physical and emotional needs of students from low-income backgrounds and help them thrive at school. 

The National Service Office for Nurse-Family Partnership and Child First for enhanced nursing education and nurse consultations to better serve mothers and families from low-income backgrounds in Yakima County. 

Tri-State Steelheaders  to help expand the Salmon In School environmental education program that enriches science learning for students as they raise salmon and release them to local streams.

Wenas Mammoth Foundation for geologist tool kits for the STEM Youth Paleontology, Archeology and Geology Summer Camps for Yakima County students in grades 3-12. 

Walla Walla Community College Foundation for support of the Pacific Power Scholarship Fund that helps students from underserved populations who are enrolled in workforce or STEM-related areas of study. 

 

About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 2 million customers in six Western states as Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming and Idaho) and Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington and California). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power. Since it started in 1988, the PacifiCorp Foundation has awarded more than $60 million to nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.


Death investigation-Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 09/26/22 11:50 AM

On Sunday, Septeber25, 2022 at 8:28 AM, the Oregon State Police and Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office responded to 5677 SW Young Avenue in Redmond and located an adult male, identified as Trevit C. Law (45) of Redmond, who had been shot. Responding officers provided immediate first aid but Law was pronounced deceased. 

During the subsequent investigation, Skyler R. Myers (32) of Redmond was developed as the suspect in the shooting. A multi-agency effort tracked Myers approximately 7 hours, eventually locating him near Gift Road and the Deschutes Canal. Myers sustained a self-inflicted gunshot wound and was transported to St. Charles Medical Center where he later was pronounced deceased. 

OSP was assisted in the ground search by Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Bend Police Department and Redmond Police Department. 

The investigation is active and no further information will be released at this time. 


Board on Public Safety Standards and Training Meeting Scheduled 10-27-22
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 09/26/22 11:42 AM

BOARD ON PUBLIC SAFETY STANDARDS AND TRAINING

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, October 27, 2022, in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Shelby Wright at (503) 378-2191 or shelby.wright@dpsst.oregon.gov

The meeting will be live-streamed on the DPSST Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon/ 

1. Introductions

2. Minutes

Approve minutes from the July 28, 2022, Meeting

3. Fire Policy Committee

a. Fire Policy Committee Update – James Oeder, Chair

b. Consent Agenda (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

A. Committee Appointments

Fire Policy Committee Appointments

  • TBD

4. Criminal Justice Policy Committees

a. Police Policy Committee Update – John Teague, Chair

b. Telecommunications Policy Committee Update – Michael Fletcher, Chair

c. Corrections Policy Committee Update – Matthew English, Chair

d. Consent Agenda (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

A. Jesus Alvarez DPSST #55323 (DOC/Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution) – Revoke

Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the CPC on August 9, 2022.

B. Shawn Carter DPSST #44728 (Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office) – Revoke

Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the PPC on August 18, 2022.

C. Raymond Dube #41238 (Oregon State Police) – Revoke

Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the PPC on August 18, 2022.

D. Christopher Hurst DPSST #34278 (Cottage Grove Police Department) – Revoke

Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the TPC on August 3, 2022.

E. Tyrone Jenkins DPSST #29620 (Polk County Sheriff’s Office) – No Action

Unanimous vote with two recusals to recommend to the Board by the PPC on August 18, 2022.

F. David Knudsen DPSST #59147 (DOC/Snake River Correctional Institution) – No Action

Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the CPC on August 9, 2022.

G. Abigail Mobley DPSST #45844 (Grant County Sheriff’s Office) – Revoke

Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the CPC on August 9, 2022.

H. Andrew Richman DPSST #51981 (DOC/Coffee Creek Correctional Facility) – Revoke

Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the CPC on August 9, 2022.

I. Daniel Schram DPSST #31475 (Jackson County Community Justice) – Revoke

11 (eleven) to 0 (zero) vote, with one member abstaining, to recommend to the Board by the CPC on August 9, 2022.

J. Benjamin Scheen DPSST #44685 (Klamath County Sheriff’s Office) – Revoke

Unanimous vote with one recusal to recommend to the Board by the PPC on August 18, 2022.

K. Jerry Wollenschlaeger #34042 (Marion County Sheriff’s Office) – Revoke

Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the PPC on August 18, 2022.

L. Proposed Rule Changes for Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) 259-008-0065; Equity Mainenance Training Requirements

Unanimous vote by the PPC and 6 (six) to 5 (five) vote by the CPC to recommend to the Board in the August 2022 Policy Committee meetings.

M. Proposed Rule Changes for Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) 259-008-0069; Tribal Law Enforcement

N. Approval for Changes to the Basic Police Curriculum

   Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the PPC on August 18, 2022.

O. Proposed Rule Changes for Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) 259-008-0085; Basic Police Curriculum Changes

P. Proposed Rule Changes for Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) 259-008-0510; Adopting Rules and Best Practices for Interacting with Persons Who Have Experienced Trauma

     Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the PPC on August 18, 2022.

Q. Committee Appointments

Telecommunications Policy Committee Appointments

  • TBD

Police Policy Committee Appointments

  • TBD

5. Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee

a. Private Security Investigator Policy Committee Update – Thomas Thomas, Chair

b. Consent Agenda (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

 A. Luis Dominguez PSID #039212 (First Alert Security LLC) – Issue Civil Penalty

Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the PSIPC on August 16, 2022

B. Proposed Rule Changes for Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) 259-060-0136; Remote Training for Unarmed and Alarm Monitor Private Security Courses

Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the PSIPC on August 16, 2022

6. Agency Update – Acting Director Brian Henson

7. Next Meeting Date: January 26, 2022, at 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Board members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Oregon State Police Southwest Region Drug Enforcement Team makes Illegal Marijuana Bust- Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/26/22 10:15 AM
OSP DES- Jackson County
OSP DES- Jackson County
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/1002/157781/thumb_20220922_142646.jpg

On Thursday, September 22, 2022, the Oregon State Police Southwest Region Drug Enforcement Section team, with assistance from several other agencies, served search warrants on two separate locations in Prospect, Jackson County: a warehouse near 1st St. and an address in the 400 block of Red Blanket Rd. 

Located at the warehouse property were one firearm and approximately 1,800 pounds of illegal, processed marijuana packaged for transport/sale on the black market.  One individual, Yasmany Mesa, age 30, was detained, identified, interviewed, and subsequently lodged in the Jackson County Jail on the charges of; 166.270 Possession of Firearm by Felon (Fel, C); 475C.337 Possession of Marijuana - Person >= 21 - Over 8 Lbs. Usable (Fel, C); 475C.345 Delivery of Marijuana - Over 8 Lbs. Usable in Public Place or Household (Fel, C); and 475C.349 Manufacture of Marijuana - Over 12 Plants. 

Located and seized at the Red Blanket address were approximately 2,360 pounds of illegal marijuana, 416 illegal marijuana plants, approximately $17,000.00 US Currency, twelve firearms, and an assortment of trailers and vehicles associated with the illegal marijuana criminal enterprise. Two individuals were detained, identified, interviewed, and later released.

All illegal marijuana seized at both locations was ultimately destroyed. 

The OSP SWR DES team was assisted by the Interagency Marijuana Enforcement Team (IMET) of the Medford Police Department and Jackson County Sheriff’s Office, the Department of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (AFT) and the OSP Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team. 

The investigation is ongoing with no further information available for release.




Attached Media Files: OSP DES- Jackson County , OSP DES - Jackson County , OSP DES- Jackson County

Richland Installs Community's First Save Station in Howard Amon Park (Photo)
City of Richland - 09/26/22 8:02 AM
2022-09/5957/157779/AEDSavestation_Invitation_(Facebook_Cover)_(1920__1005_px).png
2022-09/5957/157779/AEDSavestation_Invitation_(Facebook_Cover)_(1920__1005_px).png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/5957/157779/thumb_AEDSavestation_Invitation_(Facebook_Cover)_(1920__1005_px).png

As part of the successful Heart Safe Richland initiative, Richland Fire & Emergency Services will is unveiling the first 27/7 publicly accessible Automated External Defibrillator (AED) in our community. This AED is located in a Save Station Cabinet off Lee Blvd. in Howard Amon Park, Richland.

City officials and staff will be unveiling the new lifesaving equipment on Thursday, September 29th at 11:00 a.m.  The media and public are invited to attend and learn how to use this valuable resource. 

Sudden Cardiac Arrest can happen to anyone, at any time, but unfortunately, the survival rate nationwide is only about 10%. This is largely because we do not have enough public awareness about Sudden Cardiac Arrest, AEDs, and the importance of CPR.

Save Station is helping communities place more AEDs in public spaces and empowering people with the knowledge and confidence to take action!

The AED inside is equipped with a compact, battery-operated Save Station GO monitoring device. This provides 24/7 monitoring of the AED status, ensuring it is ‘ready for rescue’. It also includes location services with GPS tracking and hands-free 2-way communication with emergency services. 

Save Station provides educational information and training videos. They can be found by visiting https://savestation.ca

More information regarding Richland’s Heart Safe Richland program can be found at www.heartsaferichland.com




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/5957/157779/AEDSavestation_Invitation_(Facebook_Cover)_(1920__1005_px).png

Sun. 09/25/22
Structure Fire at 63357 Deschutes Market Rd (Photo)
Bend Fire & Rescue - 09/25/22 4:00 PM
Photo courtesy of Bend Fire & Rescue
Photo courtesy of Bend Fire & Rescue
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/6802/157775/thumb_Fire_Photo_1.jpg

At 3:08 am on Sunday, September 25, 2022, Bend Fire & Rescue crews were dispatched to a reported structure fire on Deschutes Market Rd.  Initial reports were of flames venting from an attached garage.  First arriving crews found a fully involved 500 square foot log garage with extension to the exterior of the residence, a two story, 2200 square foot log home constructed in 1988.  Two occupants inside the home evacuated with fire department assistance as they were not awakened by the fire.  Smoke alarms in the home did not sound as the fire was on the exterior.  The garage, which was attached to the residence by a covered breezeway, sustained a roof collapse and was a total loss.  The residence sustained minor smoke and water damage to the interior, with some charring to the exterior and minor roof involvement at the eaves on the west side of the home.  Damage is estimated at $150,000 to the structures, and $75,000 to the contents.  This includes two vehicles, a 2014 Toyota Sienna and a 2013 Nissan Leaf that were destroyed, as well as several custom bicycles that were in the garage.  

Upon investigation, it was found that the fire originated in a plastic trash can inside the garage.  The homeowner had spent several hours the previous day staining his deck, and had disposed of the oil soaked rags into the trash can.  

Bend Fire & Rescue would like to remind the community that proper disposal of oily rags is key to preventing a spontaneous combustion fire.  Rags should be placed into a metal can, the can filled with water, and a tight-sealing lid placed on the can.  Contact your local disposal company for their policies regarding disposal of the can and contents. For more home fire safety information, visit our website at https://www.bendoregon.gov/government/departments/fire-rescue/safety-tips-emergency-preparedness/year-round-safety-tips




Attached Media Files: Photo courtesy of Bend Fire & Rescue

Sat. 09/24/22
Oregon National Guard Helping Fight Double Creek Fire (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 09/24/22 6:43 PM
220923-Z-ZJ128-1004
220923-Z-ZJ128-1004
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/962/157769/thumb_DSC00955.jpg

JOSEPH, Ore. - Oregon National Guard members are helping with the Double Creek Fire by providing staffing to road closure points around the fire's perimeter. The Double Creek Fire in the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest in Northeast, Oregon, at at more than 157,000 acres it is considered a Megafire by the U.S. Forest Service. Currently, the Oregon Forestry Department says they have the fire 81% contained that started by a lightning strike.

The Oregon National Guard has been at the fire since September 10, and recently switched out some personnel with fresh service members to provide safety and security. The approximately 30 guard members staffing road closure points serve to protect area residents and wildland firefighters. 

Army National Guard Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Decker, who's volunteered since the Rum Creek Fire in Josephine County, said, "The National Guard is the last resource called in to come in and help – so we come in, we help with these TAPs (Traffic Assistance Points), where we're out there trying to keep everybody safe."

Wallowa County is a very rural area that draws many to its natural beauty and outdoor activities. 

“It’s that time of the season, and you know they want to do their hunt, and they got their tags, and they want to fill them,” said Decker. "We understand that, but it's not safe for them, and it's not safe for the fire crews either."

Oregon National Guard Maj. Joshua Reese, the officer in charge of the National Guard group, is an IT specialist that works at the Salem Hospital for his civilian job, said, "As a Citizen-Soldier, it's an honor to serve my fellow Oregonians and help keep people safe,” commenting on his fellow members supporting fire operations. "I'm really proud of our group, some of these soldiers and airmen have been on State Active Duty [orders] for over 28 days, working these closure points."

The Oregon National Guard has a history of helping fight wildland fires, like their motto, "Always Ready, Always There." The guard has several firefighting crews trained to fight fires that are ready if called on to support strained civilian firefighting crews. In addition, Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen are volunteers that typically serve one weekend a month and two weeks a year. The National Guard is the primary military organization that also serves the communities where they live.

                                                                               -30-

B-roll link: https://www.dvidshub.net/video/858563/oregon-national-guard-helping-fight-double-creek-fire

Photo Captions

220923-Z-ZJ128-1001
Cpt. Cody Comerford and Maj. Joshua Reese give an in-brief to fresh Double Creek Fire volunteers of the Oregon National Guard at the La Grande National Guard Armory Sept. 23, 2022. The volunteers will staff road closure points around the perimeter of the Double Creek Megafire in the Wallowa Whitman National Forest area.

(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220923-Z-ZJ128-1002
Double Creek Fire volunteers Sgt. Justin Seibel, Sgt. Kenneth Steward, and Spc. Pamela Fredrick fill out State Active Duty forms at the La Grande National Guard Armory Sept. 23, 2022. The volunteers will staff road closure points around the perimeter of the Double Creek Megafire in the Wallowa Whitman National Forest area.

(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220923-Z-ZJ128-1003
Non-Commissioned Officer In Charge (NCOIC) Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Decker gives a situation brief to new Double Creek Fire volunteers at the main fire camp in Joseph, Ore., Sept. 23, 2022. The volunteers will staff road closure points around the perimeter of the Double Creek Megafire in the Wallowa Whitman National Forest area.

(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220923-Z-ZJ128-1004
Double Creek Fire volunteer Spc. Zack Baker talks with area residents at a road closure point in Imnaha, Ore., Sept. 23, 2022. Baker, along with fellow guard members, are staffing road closure points around the perimeter of the Double Creek Megafire in the Wallowa Whitman National Forest area.

(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)
 




Attached Media Files: 220923-Z-ZJ128-1004 , 220923-Z-ZJ128-1003 , 220923-Z-ZJ128-1002 , 220923-Z-ZJ128-1001

Expect delays on OR 86 (Baker-Copperfield Hwy.) tonight
ODOT: East. Ore. - 09/24/22 11:22 AM

Expect delays on OR 86 (Baker-Copperfield Hwy.) tonight (Sept. 24) for movement of oversized transport trailer from Copperfield to Baker City. Check TripCheck.com for details and update information.  https://www.tripcheck.com/Content/PublishedFiles/55808.pdf  


Fri. 09/23/22
OAHHS Statement On Oregon Legislative Emergency Board Funding To Help Relieve Hospital Capacity Crisis
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 09/23/22 3:17 PM

Lake Oswego, Ore. – September 23, 2022 – Becky Hultberg, President and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, released the following statement on the emergency board decision to pass funding requests from OHA and DHS to help with the capacity crisis in our community hospitals:   


“On behalf of Oregon’s community hospitals, I want to express gratitude to the Legislature’s Emergency Board, which approved the OHA and DHS requests for emergency funds. This funding will help relieve the capacity crisis in our hospitals, preserving access to lifesaving care. 

We still have much work to do, but this is a great start. Thank you to Senator Peter Courtney, Representative Dan Rayfield, and the rest of the emergency board for approving these much-needed funds.” 

###

About OAHHS: Founded in 1934, OAHHS is a statewide, nonprofit trade association that works closely with local and national government leaders, business and citizen coalitions, and other professional health care organizations to enhance and promote community health and to continue improving Oregon’s innovative health care delivery system.




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/1635/157759/E_board_funding_statement_09_23_2022.pdf

Milo McIver State Park reopens to camping and Riverside day use after recent fire (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 09/23/22 2:23 PM
Trail at Milo McIver State Park
Trail at Milo McIver State Park
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/1303/157756/thumb_Trail_at_Milo_McIver.jpg

ESTACADA, Ore— Milo McIver State Park reopened its campground today for the first time after a fire burned 15 acres near the park entrance two weeks ago. 

The Riverside day use area opened earlier this week, including the viewpoint, dog park, equestrian area, Estacada Lake and upper boat launch. 

A few areas remained closed:

  • The Riverbend day use area including trails, picnic shelters, restrooms, disc golf course and primitive boat launch, is closed to allow crews to identify and work several hot spots in the burned area. There is also no power or water due to a power outage.
  • Kingfisher group camp and picnic shelter is closed due to a power outage.
  • The Viewpoint Trail is closed due to fire-related damage.

The Riverbend day use area will reopen once fire crews are finished and either power is restored or the park has installed portable toilets. The Kingfisher group camp and five picnic shelters will not be available for reservations until the power is restored.

The cause of the fire at Milo McIver State Park is still under investigation. It started about 9 p.m. on Sept. 9. Once detected by park staff, rangers immediately began evacuating the Kingfisher group camp, which was closest to the blaze, and then evacuated all 53 individual campsites in the main campground. 

“If they had not been there to help people get out as safely as they did, we could have lost lives,” said Lisa Sumption, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) Director. 

Park Manager Sam Gibson, Park Ranger Assistant Ahliae Toulouse, Park Ranger Brandon Whiteman, Park Ranger Assistant Jan Kahn, and Morgan Watson with Executive Security were recognized by Director Sumption for their quick actions during the fire. 

OPRD Columbia District Manager Clay Courtright also expressed gratitude for the local citizens, Estacada Rural Fire District, Clackamas County Fire District and all the local fire departments that were instrumental with early control of the fire. Oregon State Police and Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office were also a huge help in assisting park staff with evacuations and securing the area, he said.

Up to date information on park services is available online at https://stateparks.oregon.gov/




Attached Media Files: Trail at Milo McIver State Park , Fire crews working to removed fallen trees , Fire damage from the fire Sept. 9, 2022 at Milo McIver State Park , Trees burned near the entrance of Milo McIver State Park , Viewpoint at Milo McIver State Park

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 30
Oregon Health Authority - 09/23/22 10:22 AM

September 23, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 30

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee (RAC).

Agenda: TBD for Licensing, Facilities, and Operations RAC (Session 3).

When: Friday, Sept. 30, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1601443759?pwd=M2JFaXVkT0hzcjVPOUVFTUJWd3FyZz09  

Meeting ID: 160 144 3759

Passcode: 172831

Call-in 669 254 5252 (US)

Background: Rules Advisory Committees (RACs) are an important process that allow members of the public an opportunity to provide input on proposed administrative rules before they become effective. RACs are comprised of individuals who have subject matter expertise and members of the public who are likely to be affected by the proposed rules. The RAC process is designed to include a diversity of opinions and viewpoints. Although RACs evaluate fiscal and racial impact of the proposed rules and make recommendations, Oregon Health Authority retains decision making authority.

All community members will be invited to provide comments on the proposed rules during the public comment period scheduled from November 1 to November 21, 2022. Information about the public comment period will be sent out to the OPS mailing list later this year.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact the Oregon Psilocybin Services team at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or in@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Psilocybin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Update #1-Officer involved shooting investigation-Grants Pass Police Department-Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 09/23/22 10:00 AM

UPDATE-Name and additional details released

On Monday September 19, 2022 at 7:55 PM, officers from the Grants Pass Police Department responded to a call reporting suspicious activity in progress at a city park. Upon police contact, a male suspect fled the scene on foot and officers canvassed the neighborhood in an attempt to locate him. During the search, one of the officers encountered an armed male resident in the area. During the encounter, the resident was shot by the officer. The resident is identified as Mark Barrett Caldwell (46) of Grants Pass.

Immediate first aid was given to Caldwell and he was transported to an area hospital with critical injuries. On September 22, 2022, Caldwell was pronounced deceased at Rogue Valley Medical Center in Medford.

Police are still searching for the initial male suspect who fled and are seeking assistance from the public. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Oregon State Police Dispatch Center at 800-442-0776 or OSP (677) from your mobile phone. 

This continues to be an active investigation and no further information will be released at this time.

===============================================================

 

On Monday, September 19, 2022 at 7:55 PM, officers from the Grants Pass Police Department responded to a call reporting suspicious activity in progress at a city park. 

In response to the call, an officer involved shooting occurred on SW Westholm Avenue in Grants Pass. An adult male was shot by an officer during the incident. The involved officer has been placed on administrative leave per Senate Bill 111 protocols. 

The incident is being investigated by the Oregon State Police assisted by the Oregon State Police Forensic Laboratory. The investigation will be referred to the Josephine County District Attorney’s Office for review upon completion.

This is an active investigation and no further information will be released at this time. 


Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 29
Oregon Health Authority - 09/23/22 9:51 AM

September 23, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 29

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee (RAC).

Agenda: TBD for Packaging, Labeling, and Product Transportation RAC (Session 3).

When: Thursday, Sept. 29, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1604155121?pwd=OVREZU1vTUpjL2FYRjZ2Uk1qUUlZZz09  

Meeting ID: 160 415 5121

Passcode: 111516

Call-in 669 254 5252 (US)

Background: Rules Advisory Committees (RACs) are an important process that allow members of the public an opportunity to provide input on proposed administrative rules before they become effective. RACs are comprised of individuals who have subject matter expertise and members of the public who are likely to be affected by the proposed rules. The RAC process is designed to include a diversity of opinions and viewpoints. Although RACs evaluate fiscal and racial impact of the proposed rules and make recommendations, Oregon Health Authority retains decision making authority.

All community members will be invited to provide comments on the proposed rules during the public comment period scheduled from November 1 to November 21, 2022. Information about the public comment period will be sent out to the OPS mailing list later this year.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact the Oregon Psilocybin Services team at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or in@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Psilocybin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 28
Oregon Health Authority - 09/23/22 9:50 AM

September 23, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 28

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee (RAC).

Agenda: TBD for Facilitator Conduct, Preparation, Administration, and Integration Sessions RAC (Session 3).

When: Wednesday, Sept. 28, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1605370281?pwd=Y1VlWGNFVHZINkNkWVF6RWpSY1JYUT09  

Meeting ID: 160 537 0281

Passcode: 619313

Call-in 669 254 5252 (US)

Background: Rules Advisory Committees (RACs) are an important process that allow members of the public an opportunity to provide input on proposed administrative rules before they become effective. RACs are comprised of individuals who have subject matter expertise and members of the public who are likely to be affected by the proposed rules. The RAC process is designed to include a diversity of opinions and viewpoints. Although RACs evaluate fiscal and racial impact of the proposed rules and make recommendations, Oregon Health Authority retains decision making authority.

All community members will be invited to provide comments on the proposed rules during the public comment period scheduled from November 1 to November 21, 2022. Information about the public comment period will be sent out to the OPS mailing list later this year.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact the Oregon Psilocybin Services team at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or in@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Psilocybin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Health Information Exchange (HIE) Workgroup to meet September 30
Oregon Health Authority - 09/23/22 9:26 AM

September 23, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971.666.2476, eth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Kiari Chao, 503.931.3053, i.chao@dhsoha.state.or.us">kiari.chao@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Information Exchange (HIE) Workgroup to meet September 30

What: The regular public meeting of the Health Information Exchange (HIE) Workgroup

When: September 30, 9:00am to 12:00pm

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome (9:00-9:10); Legislative Recommendations Next Steps (9:10-9:30); State HIE Infrastructure: HIT Commons (9:30-10:20); BREAK (10:20-10:30); State HIE Infrastructure: Reliance eHealth Collaborative (10:30-11:50); Public Comment (11:50-11:55); Next Steps and Adjourn (11:55-12:00)

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/OHIT-HITOC/Pages/HIEworkgroup.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact OHIT.Info@dhsoha.state.or.us or call 503-373-7859 at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.


Thu. 09/22/22
Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets Oct. 4 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/22 5:06 PM

September 22, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets Oct. 4 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Accountability Metrics Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Approve August meeting minutes; discuss public health indicators for communicable disease control and environmental health.

When: Tuesday, Oct. 4, 9-11 a.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 669-254-5252; meeting ID 160 841 5649; or by computer, tablet or smartphone by launching this Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1608415649?pwd=NUZQNloxYjVyR2VlVml0RHArdnBGUT09.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations about public health quality measures for the board's consideration.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Healthy Homes Task Force meets Oct. 13 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/22 5:05 PM

September 22, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Healthy Homes Task Force meets Oct. 13 via Zoom

What: The Healthy Homes Task Force is holding its third (of about eight) meetings.

Agenda: Welcome, agenda, introductions; task force actions; identifying barriers; initial results from Healthy Homes Landscape Survey; public comment period; closing.

When: Thursday, Oct. 13, 2-4 p.m. Public comments will be collected during a 10-minute public comment period at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom, https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1607162369?pwd=VTUzZzVUUWcvejJiZGpDUk1vWnRqQT09

Meeting ID: 160 716 2369

Passcode: 414009

One tap mobile

+16692545252,,1607162369# US (San Jose)

+16468287666,,1607162369# US (New York)

Background: The Healthy Homes Grant Program was established by House Bill 2842 of the 2021 Oregon Legislative session. The legislation dedicated funding for home repair, lead or mold abatement, structural or safety improvements, and electrical upgrades that support energy efficiency for low income and environmental justice communities. This legislation also established a Healthy Homes Task Force to help shape the development of the Healthy Homes Grant Program.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jordana Leeb at 971-393-8487, 711 TTY, or dana.a.leeb@state.or.us">jordana.a.leeb@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 219-Yamhill County
Oregon State Police - 09/22/22 4:10 PM

On Wednesday September 21, 2022 at approximately 5:55pm, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 219 near milepost 16. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a black Buell motorcycle, operated by Rylie Carlberg (47) of Cornelius, was traveling southbound when for unknown reasons lost control of the motorcycle and collided with a northbound van, operated by Jose Valverde Ortiz (41) of Beaverton. 

Carlberg sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Jose Valverde Ortiz, and his passengers, Carlos Savedrra (38) and Abel Valverde Ortiz (34) also of Beaverton, were all uninjured. 

Hwy 219 was closed from Bald Peak Rd to Mountain Top Rd for approximately four hours.

OSP was assisted by Yamhill Co. Sheriff’s Office, Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue and ODOT. 


Oregon OSHA issues more than $144,000 in penalties to 2 contractors for exposing employees to fall hazards at sites in Salem and Woodburn (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/22/22 3:29 PM
2022-09/1073/157728/DCBS-logo-blue.jpg
2022-09/1073/157728/DCBS-logo-blue.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/1073/157728/thumb_DCBS-logo-blue.jpg

Salem – In separate enforcement actions, Oregon OSHA has issued fines totaling more than $144,000 to two contractors for violations – including repeat offenses – of fall protection rules at worksites in Salem and Woodburn. The violations put multiple workers at risk of serious injury or death from falls to lower levels.

The separate citations issued to Corvallis-based Iron Head Roofing LLC and Canby-based JMJ Construction LLC included the same violation of a basic safety requirement: Implementing adequate fall protection systems – such as a personal fall restraint system or other measures – where workers are exposed to falling six feet or more to a lower level.

For Iron Head Roofing, it was the fifth time since May 2019 that the company committed the same violation. For JMJ Construction, it was the fourth time since February 2020 that the company committed the same violation. The companies’ previous violations of the six-foot trigger-height requirements were cited as part of separate Oregon OSHA inspections at different worksites.

Falls are one of the leading causes of death in the construction industry.

“Fall protection saves lives,” said Renee Stapleton, acting administrator for Oregon OSHA. “It is an essential safety practice that employers must carry out when work is being done at heights. There is no excuse for neglecting it.”

The citation issued to Iron Head Roofing followed an inspection that found four of six employees working on the roof of a house in Salem with no fall protection. The citation against JMJ Construction came after an inspection found an employee installing siding on a house with no fall protection. Another employee was using a scaffold with no fall protection, according to the inspection.

Both inspections were conducted under Oregon OSHA’s emphasis program focused on fall hazards in construction. The prevention-based program accounts for the temporary nature of construction activity by directing inspectors to act based on observations while in the field, and to follow up on valid complaints and referrals.

Altogether, Oregon OSHA issued $144,900 in fines to both companies. The division’s citation to Iron Head Roofing involved a single repeat violation carrying a total proposed penalty of $78,000. The citation to JMJ Construction, which involved several violations, carried a total proposed penalty of $66,900. The violations were as follows: 

Iron Head Roofing

  • Fall protection systems were not in place where employees were exposed to a hazard of falling six feet or more to a lower level. It was a fifth repeat violation of the rule. Proposed penalty: $78,000.

JMJ Construction

  • Fall protection systems were not in place where employees were exposed to a hazard of falling six feet or more to a lower level. It was a fourth repeat violation of the rule. Proposed penalty: $58,500.
  • A portable ladder did not extend at least three feet above an upper landing. It was the first repeat violation of the rule. Proposed penalty: $4,500.
  • No personal fall arrest systems or guardrail systems were put in place while a scaffold was in use. Proposed penalty: $3,900.

Under Oregon OSHA rules, penalties multiply when employers commit repeat violations. Each of the citations issued to Iron Head Roofing and JMJ Construction also included a standard penalty reduction based on the small size of the company.

Employers have 30 calendar days after receiving a citation to file an appeal. 

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers free resources to help improve workplace safety and health. These resources include the division’s Fall Protection Suite of online video training and its A-to-Z topic page about fall protection

The Fall Protection Suite includes courses addressing fall protection fundamentals, and constructionroofing, and ladder safety. The A-to-Z topic page about fall protection includes a fact sheet about fall protection trigger heights for construction activities.

Employers are encouraged to use free resources – available now from Oregon OSHA and involving no fault, no citations, and no penalties – for help protecting their employees:

Consultation services – Provides free and confidential help with safety and health programs, including how to control and eliminate hazards, and hands-on training

Technical staff – Helps employers understand requirements and how to apply them to their worksites

 

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.oregon.gov/dcbs/.

 

 



 




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/1073/157728/DCBS-logo-blue.jpg , Oregon OSHA logo

Turn over a new leaf -- give blood or platelets this fall
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 09/22/22 2:22 PM

Donors have chance at VIP racing experience and more as new season begins 

 

Portland, Ore (September 22, 2022) — On the first day of fall, the American Red Cross is asking the public to start the season off with a lifesaving blood or platelet donation. While the leaves turn, the need for blood never changes. Those who give this fall play an important role in keeping the blood supply high enough to help patients counting on blood products for care– especially ahead of the busy holiday season. Book a time to give blood or platelets by using the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org or by calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). 

As a thank-you, the Red Cross is offering these exciting opportunities for donors: 

  • All who come to give through Sept. 30 will be automatically entered for a chance to win a VIP NASCAR racing experience, including two tickets to a 2023 Sport Clips Haircuts-sponsored race of the winner’s choice, round-trip airfare for two, up to a three-night hotel stay, and entry to a Sport Clips racetrack hospitality tent, if available, plus a $750 gift card, thanks to Sport Clips. 
  • Those who come to give in September will also receive a coupon for a free haircut by email, also thanks to Sport Clips. Details are available at rcblood.org/racetogive. 
  • All who come to give Oct. 1-31, 2022, will receive a $5 e-Gift Card by email to a merchant of choice.

 

Upcoming blood donation opportunities Sept. 23-Oct. 15:

 

September 24, 2022

Charles Drew Blood Drive, 3131 N Vancouver Avenue, Portland, 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

 

September 26, 2022

Even Hotel, 2133 Centennial Plaza, Eugene, 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

 

September 30, 2022

Meier and Frank Depot Building, 1417 NW Everett St., Portland, 8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

 

October 3, 2022

Talent Community Center, 104 E Main St., Talent, 12:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

 

October 4, 2022

Riverdale High School, 9727 SW Terwilliger Blvd, Portland, 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

 

October 5, 2022

OHSU Knight Cancer Center, 15700 SW Greystone Ct, Beaverton, 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

 

Visit RedCrossBlood.org and put in your zip code to find a donation site near you. 

Click here for b-roll of people giving blood.

 

How to donate blood

Simply download the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit RedCrossBlood.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or enable the Blood Donor Skill on any Alexa Echo device to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

 

Blood and platelet donors can save time at their next donation by using RapidPass® to complete their pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire online, on the day of their donation, before arriving at the blood drive. To get started, follow the instructions at RedCrossBlood.org/RapidPass or use the Blood Donor App.

 

Oregon and Washington still require face masks be worn at all blood drives and donation sites.

 

 

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

 

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CORRECTION: Oregon, Washington joined by Nevada in offering new prescription discount card
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/22 2:15 PM

September 22, 2022

Media Contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon, Washington joined by Nevada in offering new prescription discount card

PORTLAND, Ore.—Nevada has just joined Oregon and Washington in offering the ArrayRx card, a state-backed program that can save individuals up to 80% for generic drugs and 20% for brand-name drugs.

The ArrayRx Card, formerly known as Oregon/Washington Prescription Discount Card, has helped more than 550,000 participants in both states save money on needed prescription drugs for nearly two decades.

Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak received his prescription discount card Sept. 22 to celebrate the state’s participation in the ArrayRx pharmacy discount program.

“Since 2003, Oregonians have been able to access our state sponsored pharmacy discount card, and today we welcome Nevadans to the ArrayRx family,” said Trevor Douglass, DC, MPH, pharmacy purchasing director at Oregon Health Authority (OHA). “Oregon and Washington have a rich history of collaborating on the pharmacy purchasing front.”

By implementing the ArrayRx Card program, Nevada will be able to offer the same savings that people in Oregon and Washington have enjoyed, thanks to the expansion of the ArrayRx pooled purchasing potential.

How the ArrayRx card works

For people interested in using ArrayRx, the enrollment process is simple and free, and there no age or income restrictions. For those who have insurance, they can choose to use the ArrayRx Card or their pharmacy benefit at the point of sale, whichever provides a better price. All U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs prescribed by a licensed provider are eligible for a discount. Mail-order and specialty drugs are also available.

“The ArrayRx card was supportive to many Oregonians during the historic wildfires that broke out during Labor Day weekend 2020,” said Heidi Murphy, pharmacy purchasing program and ArrayRx operations manager at OHA. “Evacuees were able to contact ArrayRx and quickly get discounted medications to replace those they had to leave behind when fleeing the fires. Receiving their needed medications helped provide some stability in an otherwise stressful and difficult situation.”

Donna Sullivan, chief pharmacy officer for the Washington Health Care Authority, ArrayRx offers pharmacy benefit management services for local government, private sector businesses, labor organizations and individuals.

“Between 2003 and 2022, 1.2 million participants in Oregon and Washington benefitted from the ArrayRx services,” Sullivan said. “We welcome the residents of Nevada to receive the same prescription drug discounts through the ArrayRx Card.”

To learn more about the ArrayRX Discount Card, visit www.arrayrxcard.com. The website is available in Spanish at: https://www.arrayrxcard.com/es.

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State shares revised action plan, timeline for engaging Oregonians in protecting lives, property from wildfire
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/22/22 12:15 PM

SALEM, Ore.—The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) today announced a revised action plan and timeline for engaging the public on wildfire protection efforts as part of the state’s strategy to create more fire-resilient communities.

“A big part of our work over the next year is focused on engaging with, listening to and informing the public about wildfire risk,” said Cal Mukumoto, Oregon State Forester and director of ODF. “This engagement will involve visiting communities across the state, talking with people, addressing concerns and answering questions. Ultimately, all of the agencies involved in this effort want to make sure Oregonians in the most at-risk communities know what they can do to better protect themselves, their families and friends, and their homes from wildfire.” 

In the past decade, wildfires have been burning significantly more acres than before, while also becoming more challenging and costlier to fight. Between 2012 and 2021, the state of Oregon spent $85 million annually on wildfire suppression costs. That is compared to the previous 10 years in which the state spent $17 million annually. The scale, devastation and statewide reach of the 2020 Labor Day fires brought this reality home for many. Less than a year later, Senate Bill 762’s statewide framework for advancing wildfire protection in Oregon moved through the Oregon State Legislature with bipartisan support. 

The revised plan will be implemented in collaboration with Oregon State University’s (OSU) College of Forestry, the Oregon State Fire Marshal (OSFM) and the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS).

“Most Oregonians understand wildfires are becoming more catastrophic and more frequent. I have witnessed, across the state, that Oregonians want to be part of the solution in protecting our communities,” said Doug Grafe, Wildfire Programs Director with the Office of the Governor. “It’s clear that steps can be taken to increase the survivability of homes and communities when wildfires do occur, including creating defensible space, hardening homes and implementing hazardous fuels reduction projects.”

One component of SB 762 was the creation of a statewide wildfire risk map to serve as a planning and information tool for Oregonians, communities and state and local government. The purpose of the map—a collaboration between ODF and wildfire scientists at OSU’s College of Forestry—is to provide transparent and science-based information to Oregonians about the factors near them that drive wildfire exposure including weather, climate, vegetation and topography. The tool will also be used to guide the state in directing resources to communities with the greatest likelihood of wildfires. 

“Oregon State University’s College of Forestry has used, and will continue to use, the best science to contribute to statewide wildfire risk mapping,” said Tom DeLuca, dean of OSU’s College of Forestry. “We support the importance of changing the timeline for the mapping component of SB 762. This added time provides an opportunity to better share information and conduct authentic community engagement by listening to Oregonians and community leaders across our state in the implementation of the new law. Even with the timeline change, we must all recognize that addressing fire risk in Oregon is a priority that will require all of us to work together.”  

Based on feedback and concerns received from an earlier version of the wildfire risk map, the state revised its timeline for implementing the map to allow for robust community engagement, outreach and education. The revised timeline is as follows: 

  • October through February 2023: Public and stakeholder engagement, outreach and education. Includes wildfire science, risk and mitigation outreach and education, with focus on the most vulnerable areas; identifying opportunities for investments in wildfire prevention; completing building codes and defensible space standards for the most vulnerable communities; compilation and analysis of feedback received; and technical refinements.
  • March 1, 2023: Public rollout of draft wildfire risk map. Draft map shared with the public.
  • March through September 2023: Public outreach, engagement and education on draft wildfire risk map. Includes working with ODF, OSU College of Forestry, local governments, planning departments, Department of Land Conservation and Development, Oregon State Fire Marshal and the state Building Codes Division to review the draft map; public outreach, education and engagement on the draft map and related topics including building codes and defensible space standards; and making any necessary revisions based on feedback received on updated map.
  • October through December 2023: Final wildfire risk map shared with the public for implementation. Includes sharing a final wildfire risk map with the public, initiating a 60-day appeals process and notifying those who are in the most high-risk areas about the steps needed to protect their homes and properties from catastrophic wildfires and how to comply with defensible space standards and building codes.

“The revised plan and timeline allow us to prioritize engagement, collaboration and communication,” said Grafe. “We are committed to ensuring people understand what they can do to increase the likelihood their homes and properties will survive wildfires. The wildfire risk map is one of several tools we will use to inform this work.”

SB 762 directs state agencies to focus resources in Oregon’s highest-risk areas to ensure homes are adhering to building codes and defensible space standards. These building codes and defensible space standards will not be adopted or implemented until the wildfire risk map is finalized in late 2023, but will be available in the near future so people can familiarize themselves with the new expectations. 

The DCBS Division of Financial Regulation (DFR) confirmed last month that no Oregon insurance company used the original map to set rates (rating) or as part of a decision to offer or renew insurance coverage (underwriting), and none planned to use it for those purposes in the future. The DFR continues to conduct work to ensure that wildfire mitigation activities are accounted for in underwriting and rating processes. Homeowners are encouraged to contact DFR’s consumer advocates at 1-888-877-4894 (toll-free) with questions or concerns about their insurance policy.

For more information, visit the following websites:


DPSST Police Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled 10-5-22
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 09/22/22 12:10 PM

POLICE POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Special Meeting

The Police Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a special meeting at 10:00 a.m. October 5, 2022, in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST or Department) located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Shelby Wright at (503) 378-2191.

The Police Policy Committee meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

 

1. Introductions

2. Applicant Review Committee Membership Nominations

3. Next Police Policy Committee Meeting – November 17, 2022, at 10:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Police Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 199-Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 09/22/22 11:55 AM

On Wednesday, September 21, 2022 at approximately 4:00 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 199 near milepost 38. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a white Ford pickup, operated by an adult male who is a California resident, was northbound and crossed the over the oncoming lanes, exited the roadway and struck several trees. 

The operator of the Ford sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. The name is being withheld pending notification of next of kin. 

Hwy 199 was affected for approximately 3 hours. 

OSP was assisted by Josephine County Sheriff’s Office, Illinois Valley Fire Department and ODOT. 


WSU Tri-Cities, Columbia Basin College and Washington Workforce Portal host fall career and internship fair
WSU Tri-Cities - 09/22/22 11:06 AM

RICHLAND, Wash. – Thanks to a collaborative effort between Washington State University Tri-Cities, Columbia Basin College and Washington Workforce Portal, individuals will have the opportunity to meet in person with a variety of regional employers and inquire about current and future jobs and internship opportunities as part of the Fall Career and Internship Fair on Thursday, Oct. 13.

The career fair will take place from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. on the WSU Tri-Cities campus. The career fair is free and open to the public.

Anyone interested in attending can register at tricities.wsu.edu/careerfair22. Registration is required to attend.

More than 50 employers are signed up to participate. Registration for employers is still open. Interested employers can register at https://app.joinhandshake.com/emp/career_fairs/34729. The standard registration fee is $250 and for private non-profits and small businesses the fee is $150. 

For more information, contact Laura Sanchez at icities.careers@wsu.edu">tricities.careers@wsu.edu or 509-372-7600


Fire danger reduction but burning still closed.
Bend Fire & Rescue - 09/22/22 7:35 AM

Even though the weather is changing and we are seeing some rain and colder temperatures, the fire danger is still high, outdoor burning is still closed. Fire danger levels have reduced to High from Extreme throughout Central Oregon but we’re not done with fire season just yet. Warmer, dryer weather returns this weekend and next week and the potential for wildfires return with those conditions.  

Central Oregon fire agencies are working collaboratively to determine the best time to open burning based on weather and fire safety factors. Escaped debris burning is the leading cause of wildfires in Oregon. Once a debris burn escapes, there is instant threat to your home, neighboring properties and forest lands. Ensuring the conditions are good for safe burning is key to allowing burning to commence. 

Remember to always check with your local fire agency about specific regulations in your area. There are many cities and communities, like the City of Bend, that do not allow debris burning at all due to air quality concerns. Be sure to always check before your fire, every time. Being sure burning is allowed and safe to conduct is a great first step in preventing escaped fires. Call 541-322-6335 for up to date burning information for anyone living in an area covered by Bend Fire Department.