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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Mon. Feb. 17 - 4:51 pm
Mon. 02/17/20
Oregon Lions Foundation helps kids get the vision treatment they need (Photo)
Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation - 02/17/20 11:32 AM
Sprague High School Health Occupations student screening at Liberty Elementary in Salem.
Sprague High School Health Occupations student screening at Liberty Elementary in Salem.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-02/1832/131595/thumb_20200107-OLSHF-LibertyElemScreening-127-color_-_Ian.jpg

By Ian Rollins
Contributing writer

It takes 15 seconds to check a child’s vision, to determine if the child needs glasses or further eye care.

That 15 seconds can change a child’s life. Without the screening, a child with vision problems will likely struggle in school, possibly becoming one of the nearly 20 percent of high school students across Oregon who don’t graduate. In fact, a student who can’t read at grade level by the end of third grade is 13 times less likely to graduate from high school.

With the screening, the child has a much greater chance to get the vision help that he or she needs, which can lead to success in school. That can lead the child beyond high school graduation to advanced degrees and successful careers, and it can set the child up to become one of your community’s future leaders.

The Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation can do this screening in 15 seconds with vision-testing equipment. In fact, the foundation and its partners can screen an elementary school with 450 students in two hours. But the foundation needs help to screen every student across the state.

The Oregon Legislature has mandated that every elementary school student through age 7 across the state have a documented vision screening. The Legislature has incorporated funds within the Oregon Department of Education budget to cover screening for students up to their senior year in high school, with funding priority given to students pre-kindergarten through third grade.

The Oregon Department of Education (ODE) has $2 million per year for the 2019-2020 and 2020-21 fiscal years for the screenings. The funds cover almost half of Oregon’s students through 12th grade, which means the Foundation needs further support from the communities it serves across Oregon.

Colt Gill, ODE Director, participated in a recent vision screening in Salem and noted, “Based on the results, some of the students will be heading to the eye doctor. That will set them on a path to learning and being successful in school so I really appreciate the work.”

"Support for vision screening of Oregon students is basically joining the alliance of those working to improve our high school graduation rate here in Oregon,” said Doug Thompson, executive director of the foundation. “This is our future workforce so let's equip them now with the tools needed to be successful in life."

The recent Foundation screening at Liberty Elementary School in Salem showcased what the Foundation can do for elementary school students. Each class took their turns getting screened, with five Health Career students from Sprague High School using the hand-held screening machines to check the kids’ vision. Members of the South Salem Lions Club directed traffic, which moved quickly between the 15-second screenings.

The Foundation will report the results back to the Salem-Keizer school district which will work with the parents to get eye care to the students who need it.

Lynn Oehler, lead nurse for the district, said the machines can detect with 13 measures up to 8 conditions in each eye.

“We have a pretty high rate of referrals for further care, but it’s mainly for conditions like astigmatism and other conditions that can be easily corrected,” Oehler said. “When we catch these conditions at a younger age, it absolutely helps the student’s learning process.”

“And it’s so much more efficient with the new technology,” said Eric Richards, director of student services for the Salem-Keizer School District. Prior to the handheld machines, the foundation used eye charts, which don’t allow for testing of nearly as many conditions.

“This is a wonderful service and an important partnership with the Foundation,” Richards said.

Brad King, one of the Foundation’s screening coordinators, said the Foundation is planning to screen an entire Portland-area high school with more than 2,800 students. He anticipated it will take an entire day but will be worth it to make sure any students with vision problems are identified.

With local financial support and partnership, the Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation can reach every student in the state. The Foundation is a 501c3 nonprofit, with a four-star ranking from Charity Navigator, and due to all administrative expenses being covered by its own long term investment fund every dollar raised by the organization directly supports its sight and hearing services.

OLSHF maintains a yearly review with the Better Business Bureau. The organization meets all 20 Standards for Charity Accountability and is a BBB Accredited Charity. 

The Foundation can screen a child for $3.20, which is about 10 percent of the cost in an optometric office. The Department of Education’s budget for screenings is enough to cover more than 281,000 students per year, kindergarten through 12th grade, not enough to cover all of Oregon’s 582,000 students.

“Your support of the screenings would be used to offset any costs not covered by the state for screenings in your community,” Thompson said. “It would also assist with the costs associated with helping the students referred as needing a follow-up exam and new eyeglasses, to receive them.”

For more information, please contact Doug Thompson at DougT@olshf.org or call the Foundation at (503) 413-7399.




Attached Media Files: Sprague High School Health Occupations student screening at Liberty Elementary in Salem.

Sun. 02/16/20
UPDATE - Oregon State Police Investigating Officer Involved Shooting in Silverton - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 02/16/20 8:53 PM

The Oregon State Police is continuing the investigation into the OIS in Silverton.

Preliminary investigation has revealed that William Bluestone was in possession of a handgun at the time of the shooting.

The Silverton Officer was wearing a body worn camera and the incident was recorded.  It is unable to be released at this time as this is an open/active investigation.

The Oregon State Police and Marion County DA’s office understands the public’s desire to know immediate information when an officer is involved in a deadly use of force.  However in an effort to complete a fair and thorough investigation information needs to be withheld until after a Grand Jury can be convened to hear the facts of the case, as is Marion County District Attorneys standard practice.

No more information is available to be released at this time.

On February 14, 2020 at approximately 12:40 P.M., Silverton Police Department personnel responded to a reported domestic violence disturbance at 911 Reserve St. Apt.#3, in Silverton.

Shortly after arriving, officers located the involved man, William Bluestone (21) of Bend/Silverton, concealed in the bedroom of the apartment. Bluestone told officers he was armed with a handgun and barricaded himself.

Officers attempted to negotiate his surrender for more than an hour when shots were fired. Bluestone was pronounced deceased by medical personnel who arrived shortly thereafter.

This investigation is being led by the Oregon State Police with the assistance of the Salem Police Department, Marion County Sheriff's Office and Keizer Police Department. The Marion County District Attorney’s Office is overseeing the investigation and will release additional details when appropriate.

The involved officer was placed on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation as per protocol.


Sat. 02/15/20
Oregon Public Safety Academy Hosts Largest Two-Day Fire Training Event Offered in the Northwest (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/15/20 2:43 PM
Opening Ceremony
Opening Ceremony
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More than 200 career and volunteer firefighters from more than 75 fire agencies (city and tribal fire departments, fire districts, and wildland) throughout the state are at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem this weekend for the State's annual Winter Fire School.

This two-day event began with the posting of the colors by the Oregon Fire Service Honor Guard after which all military service members in attendance were recognized for protecting our nation.  Those attending the training made a $500 donation to help support the state's Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial which is located on the grounds of the Academy and honors more than 150 men and women from diverse backgrounds who died in the line of duty while protecting our communities, airports and natural resources.

This is the 17th annual Winter Fire School hosted by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) and is held at the Oregon Public Safety Academy 4190 Aumsville Highway in Salem.

Nine classes are being offered by the National Fire Academy, DPSST, and the City of Dallas Fire & EMS Department.

Classes range from leadership topics such as Incident Safety Officer, Leadership in Supervision: Creating Environments for Professional Growth, Instructor Development, Fire Service Culture: Who Protects Firefighters from Firefighters?, Leadership in Supervision: Frameworks to Success, Wildland Urban Interface: Fire Adapted Communities-Introduction and Leadership.  Hands-on training classes include Vehicle Extrication, Emergency Vehicle Operations, and Live-Fire Training.

DPSST Director Eriks Gabliks said "DPSST is proud to offer this weekend training event each year.  This event is held in a weekend setting because over 80% of the firefighters in Oregon are volunteers. This two-day event is the largest two-day fire training experience in the Pacific Northwest that is offered free of charge.  The hands-on classes being offered are using training props which DPSST recently received thanks to a FEMA Assistance to Firefighters Grant."

While many people are aware of DPSST's law enforcement training programs, they may not realize that DPSST is also the state fire training organization for Oregon and provides hundreds of training opportunities to more than 7,000 firefighters each year at the Academy and at regional locations statewide free of charge with funds provided by the Oregon Legislative Assembly from the state's Fire Insurance Premium Tax.

DPSST appreciates the red carpet hospitality local businesses, and the Salem community as a whole, roll-out for the career and volunteer firefighters attending this weekend training opportunity.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Patricia Patrick-Joling serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 45,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, 9-1-1 telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.




Attached Media Files: Opening Ceremony , Classroom , Classroom , Vehicle Rescue , Vehicle Rescue , Vehicle Rescue , Vehicle Rescue , Vehicle Rescue , Live Fire Training , Live Fire Training

Fri. 02/14/20
Pacific Power rate filings reflect low-cost, clean energy transformation
Pacific Power - 02/14/20 3:46 PM

MEDIA HOTLINE: 1-800-570-5838

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 14, 2020

 

Pacific Power rate filings reflect low-cost, clean energy transformation

Company’s first general rate filing in seven years and 2021 power costs forecast propose a 1.6 percent overall increase along with noteworthy investments in renewables, grid reliability,
and customer service enhancements

 

PORTLAND, Ore. (Feb. 14, 2020) — How the West generates, delivers and consumes electricity is undergoing a rapid change with customer preferences at its center. Today Pacific Power filed requests with the Public Utility Commission of Oregon that updates its costs and represents a major rethinking of how the company produces, transports and delivers electricity to power Oregon’s future.

 

After seven years of investment without raising prices, the new proposals include a 1.6 percent average increase reflecting the implementation of Pacific Power’s Energy Vision 2020 renewable energy and transmission initiative, multiple customer service enhancements, investments in wildfire mitigation, cyber security, and innovative rate design proposals to increase transparency and opportunity for customers to better manage their energy use. The company has also focused on expanding its renewable resources and improving how customers receive information through improved outage notification, online tools and apps, and advanced energy-management capabilities.

 

Innovative and efficient improvements for Pacific Power customers over the last seven years have resulted in lowering the company’s fixed operating costs by more than $60 million. The rate case also reflects additional operational savings associated with the early retirement of Cholla 4, a 395 MW coal unit located in Arizona. By pioneering a new western energy market that is simultaneously decarbonizing the grid, customers are receiving more than $60 million per year in savings.

 

In the last three years, the company has made historic multi-billion dollar investments in renewable energy and grid upgrades that nearly double the amount of renewable energy capacity available to serve customers. These long-term investments are also projected to save customers several hundred million dollars.

 

“Pacific Power’s top priority is to deliver affordable, safe, reliable and increasingly clean electricity to our customers and communities so they can thrive,” said Stefan Bird, president and CEO of Pacific Power. “These filings reflect significant progress to-date and we are committed to continue to innovate and provide our customers with industry-leading, sustainable energy solutions.”

 

The requests include new rate designs for customers that will more fairly reflect costs across different usage levels and remove disincentives for customers who choose an electric vehicle. A new time-of-use pilot will help customers save money when they adjust their usage times and a bill credit will be available for all customers who choose paperless billing.

 

Bill impacts from Pacific Power’s proposed increase would vary for different customers depending upon their particular situation and energy usage preferences. Even with the proposed changes, Pacific Power’s energy price changes since 2014 are well below inflation and rates will continue to be well below the national average.

 

What’s next?

The Oregon Commission will examine Pacific Power’s requests and will determine whether the schedule should be accepted as filed, modified, or rejected. If accepted as filed, the rate change would go into effect on Jan. 1, 2021. The Commission has the authority to set final rates that may be lower or higher than the company’s request, depending on the outcome of its examination.

 

How it works

The requested rate change would be an increase of $21.6 million, or 1.6 percent, effective on January 1, 2021. The impact on an average residential customer using 900 kWh per month would be $4.03, if the filings are approved by the Public Utility Commission of Oregon. This represents the combination of two filings for Pacific Power customers, the first of which requested an overall rate change of $70.8 million, or 5.4 percent, to become effective on January 1, 2021. The expected impact of this filing by itself on an average residential customer using 900 kWh per month would be $6.98 per month. However, along with the overall rate change request, Pacific Power also filed its annual power cost adjustment on February 14, 2020, forecasting a reduction of $49.2 million in costs for 2021.

 

About Pacific Power

Pacific Power provides electric service to customers in Oregon, Washington and California. It is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, providing more than 1.9 million customers with value for their energy dollar and safe, reliable electricity. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.

 

# # #


Governor Brown visits flood damaged areas
Umatilla Flood Joint Information Center - 02/14/20 2:05 PM

Umatilla County Flooding Events Update- Friday, February 14, 2020

As officials in Umatilla County continue to work with residents and landowners in the recovery effort from the recent flooding event, Governor Kate Brown is touring the region today to get a first-hand look at damages and express her appreciation to responders.

Damage Assessment Resources

As damage reports and assessments are completed, the numbers continue to climb.  As of Thursday, about 500 self-reported damage reported damage assessments have been received.  Disaster assessment continues throughout the county. These reports are used by Umatilla County to document the financial impacts and resource needs in the county.  Residents are encouraged to continue self-reporting these damages.  

The disaster reporting forms are available online www.umatillacounty.net

Damage assessments can also be reported to Umatilla County through the damage assessment hotline at 541-966-3671.  This hotline will be open daily from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. through February 17th.

American Red Cross Shelter

The American Red Cross continues to host a shelter for victims of the flood.  This shelter is now located at the Pendleton Armory. This shelter has housed 144 overnight guests since they opened.  There are 30 Red Cross volunteers supporting this effort. CTUIR is providing additional sheltering services on the Reservation.

Numerous resources are still available for those impacted by the flood.  

Umatilla County Extension Office:  The Umatilla County Extension Office in Milton-Freewater is open today until 5 p.m. for north county residents to receive assistance on damage reporting and connect with various resources.

Hotline- A hotline was established to help connect residents to reputable and vetted relief organizations to help assist in debris clean-up services.  Response times will vary due to overwhelming need, so patience is appreciated. Please call 844-965-1386 for information.

Clean-up Safety-The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has issued information to ensure the safety of our residents as clean-up efforts begin.  Link to information at https://deqblog.com/2020/02/13/tips-for-safely-managing-debris-from-flood-damaged-buildings/

Take photos-for insurance purposes, make sure to document all damages prior to beginning clean-up efforts.  Take photos of all damage.

Permitting required-Umatilla County would like to remind property owners that permits are required prior to replacing or making repairs to flood damaged structures.  There are permitting requirements for homes located within a flood plain. To learn if you home is located within a flood plain, visit www.msc.fema.gov

Dumpster availability-Umatilla County has placed dumpsters for cleaning up flood waste.  These dumpsters are distributed through various locations in the community.  Reminder, the dumpsters are ONLY for flood debris. As dumpster locations are added, they will be posted at www.umatillacounty.net

This will be the last daily update for this event, unless conditions change.  Information will continue to be updated at www.umatillacounty.net

###


Corvallis company earns safety, health recognition (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/14/20 1:57 PM
DCBS logo
DCBS logo
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(Salem) – Valliscor LLC, a chemical manufacturing firm in Corvallis, has stepped up its commitment to on-the-job safety and health by completing its first year in Oregon OSHA’s Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP).

SHARP, primarily set up to help small- and mid-sized businesses, coaches companies on how to effectively manage workplace safety and health. It empowers employers to continuously improve. In turn, companies are recognized for their success in reaching specific benchmarks. An employer becomes a graduate when it completes five years of SHARP.

Valliscor is known for its innovation, so it’s no surprise it embraced SHARP. Located within the Advanced Technology and Manufacturing Institute, Valliscor is an Oregon State University-licensed spinoff company. Its unique process allows customers in the pharmaceutical, agricultural, polymer, and electronics industries to easily add fluorine to other molecules.

In joining SHARP, Valliscor assessed and tackled a variety of safety and health issues. Pedro Molina Sanchez, safety and regulatory affairs lead for the company, said the process was “extremely valuable” in helping improve “almost every aspect of our health and safety practices and policies.”

Noting the “expertise and extensive support” of Oregon OSHA consultants, Sanchez said SHARP “accelerated our transition from a reactive to a proactive approach” to workplace safety and health. That includes increasing the company’s capacity “to identify, analyze, and communicate hazards derived from our operations more efficiently,” Sanchez said.

SHARP encourages Oregon employers to work with their employees to identify and correct hazards, and develop and implement effective safety and health programs. The benefits of the program, which is part of Oregon OSHA’s consultation services, include lower injury and illness rates, decreased workers’ compensation costs, increased employee morale, and lower product losses.

Oregon employers that have been in business for more than one year are eligible to apply for SHARP. Get more information about the program. Lean more about Oregon OSHA's no-cost consultation services.  

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 

 




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo , SHARP logo medium , SHARP logo small , Valliscor team photo

Committee for Family Forestlands meets Feb. 19 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/14/20 1:26 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Wednesday, Feb. 19 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Salem. The meeting will be in the Clatsop Room of Building C on the campus of the Oregon Department of Forestry, 2600 State Street. The committee’s agenda includes: 

  • Private Forest Division update
  • Legislative update
  • Review charter
  • Work plan review and future meeting topics
  • Woodland owner facts
  • Committee vacancies

The meeting is open to the public. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. You can find more information at https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx.


Eastern Oregon and Salem area Citizen-Soldiers Rescue Fellow Oregonians From Floods (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 02/14/20 12:12 PM
2020-02/962/131551/13122019-X-YP317-0003.JPG
2020-02/962/131551/13122019-X-YP317-0003.JPG
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SALEM-- Oregon Governor Kate Brown visited with Oregon Army National Guard service members involved in the search and rescue efforts in Umatilla County over the past week. Gov. Kate Brown declared a state of emergency Friday afternoon for Umatilla, Union, and Wallowa counties because of flooding in those areas. Three Oregon Army National Guard helicopters were initially called out by the county to support search and rescue operations. Two Pendleton based CH-47 Chinooks provided aerial reconnaissance and an HH-60M MEDEVAC Black Hawk based out of Salem arrived on scene supporting a rescue of five civilians the first evening.

Thanks to the efforts of the Oregon Army National Guard flight crews 54 people, 10 dogs, one cat and one rabbit were rescued and transported from the flooded areas via helicopter.

"I couldn't be more proud of your Oregon National Guard members and their efforts supporting flooding this month," said Major General Michael Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, "They truly embody our core values of Character, Competence, Courage and Commitment, while demonstrating that we truly are part of our communities."

Gov. Brown presented the flight crews in both Salem and Pendleton with recognition and awards for their efforts.

"These Oregon National Guard Members took part in the largest search and rescue operation in Oregon's history," said Stephen Bomar, Director of Public Affairs, Oregon Military Department, "They did an amazing job supporting the community and saving lives."

In Salem, members of G. Company, 1-189 Aviation, Capt. David Sous, Chief Warrant Officer 3 Brian Roche, Chief Warrant Officer 3 Corey Wadsworth, Chief Warrant Officer 2 Michael Newgard, Staff Sgt. Dan Cleveland, Sgt. Joey Brixey, Sgt. James Gale and Sgt. Johnny Kilroy were presented Oregon Meritorious Service Medals.

In Pendleton, members of Detachment 1 B., 1-168 Aviation, Capt. Taylor Frye, Chief Warrant Officer 3 Ray Talkington, Chief Warrant Officer 2 Jeremiah Williams, Staff Sgt. Steven Kirkpatrick, Sgt. Joseph Ford, Sgt. Marcus Hickman and Sgt. Skylar Leasy were presented with the Oregon Meritorious Service Medal.

Chief Warrant Officer 2 Steven McDaniel, Staff Sgt. Matthew Taylor and Sgt. Katelyn Shurts, also members of Detachment 1 B., 1-168 Aviation, were presented with Oregon Commendation Medals.

The Oregon Army National Guard has six CH-47 Chinooks and 12 HH-60M Black Hawks. We also have four UH-72 Lakota's, which are often used in search and rescue operations.

Elements from the 1st Battalion, 168 Aviation Regiment, CH-47 Chinooks are scheduled to mobilize and support overseas this spring.

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management was essential with search and rescue coordination efforts as well as providing inter-agency coordination to support sustained operations throughout.

0003- Oregon Governor Kate Brown presented Oregon National Service Members with G. Company 1-189 Aviation, based out of Salem, with medals and recognition for their service during Oregon's largest search and rescue operation, Feb. 14. Thanks to the efforts of the Oregon Army National Guard flight crews 54 people, 10 dogs, one cat and one rabbit were rescued and transported from the flooded areas via helicopter during the search and rescue efforts in Umatilla County over the past week. (Photo by Paul Rushing, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs

0002- Capt. David Sous, a pilot with G. Company 1-189 Aviation, Oregon Army National Guard, stands with fellow service members as Oregon Governor Kate Brown presents them with medals and recognition for their service during Oregon's largest search and rescue operation, Feb. 14. Thanks to the efforts of the Oregon Army National Guard flight crews 54 people, 10 dogs, one cat and one rabbit were rescued and transported from the flooded areas via helicopter during the search and rescue efforts in Umatilla County over the past week. (Photo by Paul Rushing, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs

0001- Oregon Governor Kate Brown presented Oregon National Service Members with G. Company 1-189 Aviation, based out of Salem, with medals and recognition for their service during Oregon's largest search and rescue operation, Feb. 14. Thanks to the efforts of the Oregon Army National Guard flight crews 54 people, 10 dogs, one cat and one rabbit were rescued and transported from the flooded areas via helicopter during the search and rescue efforts in Umatilla County over the past week. (Photo by Paul Rushing, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

 

0236- Oregon Governor Kate Brown presented Oregon National Service Members with 1st Battalion, 168 Aviation Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, based out of Pendleton, with medals and recognition for their service during Oregon's largest search and rescue operation, Feb. 14. Thanks to the efforts of the Oregon Army National Guard flight crews 54 people, 10 dogs, one cat and one rabbit were rescued and transported from the flooded areas via helicopter during the search and rescue efforts in Umatilla County over the past week. (Photo by Paula Negle, Oregon Office of emergency Management Public Affairs)

0237- Capt. Taylor Frye, a pilot with 1st Battalion, 168 Aviation Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, based out of Pendleton, stands with fellow service members as Oregon Governor Kate Brown presents them with medals and recognition for their service during Oregon's largest search and rescue operation, Feb. 14. Thanks to the efforts of the Oregon Army National Guard flight crews 54 people, 10 dogs, one cat and one rabbit were rescued and transported from the flooded areas via helicopter during the search and rescue efforts in Umatilla County over the past week. (Photo by Paula Negle, Oregon Office of emergency Management Public Affairs)

0238- Oregon Governor Kate Brown presented Oregon National Service Members with 1st Battalion, 168 Aviation Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, based out of Pendleton, with medals and recognition for their service during Oregon's largest search and rescue operation, Feb. 14. Thanks to the efforts of the Oregon Army National Guard flight crews 54 people, 10 dogs, one cat and one rabbit were rescued and transported from the flooded areas via helicopter during the search and rescue efforts in Umatilla County over the past week. (Photo by Paula Negle, Oregon Office of emergency Management Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 2020-02/962/131551/13122019-X-YP317-0003.JPG , 2020-02/962/131551/13122019-X-YP317-0002.JPG , 2020-02/962/131551/13122019-X-YP317-0001.JPG , 2020-02/962/131551/IMG_0238.JPG , 2020-02/962/131551/IMG_0237.JPG , 2020-02/962/131551/IMG_0236.JPG

BLM releases final plan to construct and maintain up to 11,000 miles of fuel breaks in the Great Basin to combat wildfires
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 02/14/20 9:36 AM

Strategically placed fuel breaks in Idaho, Oregon, Washington, California, Nevada and Utah will help firefighters control wildfires

 

BOISE, Idaho – Today, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) released the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Fuel Breaks in the Great Basin. This Final PEIS provides for the construction and maintenance of a system of up to 11,000 miles of strategically placed fuel breaks to control wildfires within a 223 million acre area that includes portions of Idaho, Oregon, Washington, California, Nevada and Utah.

 

The Preferred Alternative outlined in the PEIS analyzes a full suite of manual, chemical and mechanical treatments, including prescribed fire, seeding, and targeted grazing to construct and maintain a system of fuel breaks. These treatments would be implemented along roads and rights-of-way on BLM-administered lands to minimize new disturbance and wildlife habitat fragmentation and to maximize accessibility for wildland firefighters.

 

“Recovering from the devastating effects of wildlfires can take decades in the rugged, high-desert climate of the Great Basin. These tools will help firefighters contain fires when they break out,” said Acting Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management Casey Hammond. “That’s why creating fuel breaks is incredibly important to the entire basin, the people who live in these communities, and our wildland firefighters.”

 

“Wildfires pose an enormous threat to rangelands in the Great Basin – rangelands that people depend on for both recreational opportunities and their livelihoods, and that wildlife rely on for habitat,” said BLM Deputy Director for Policy and Programs William Perry Pendley. “Fuel breaks are one of the most important tools we have to give wildland firefighters a chance to safely and effectively contain rapidly moving wildfires and potentially reduce wildfire size.” 

 

Wildfires in sagebrush communities in the Great Basin states are becoming more frequent and larger, fueled by large, unbroken swaths of grasses, brush and other vegetation. Over 13.5 million acres of historically sagebrush communities on BLM land burned within the project area between 2009 and 2018. Wildfires that consume sagebrush provide the opportunity for invasive annual grasses to increase, making future large and severe wildfires more likely.

 

The concept behind fuel breaks is to break up or fragment continuous fuels by reducing vegetation in key locations. When a wildfire burns into a fuel break, the flame lengths decrease and its progress slows, making it safer and easier for firefighters to control.

 

“All of wildland firefighting is centered around constructing fuel breaks,” said BLM Idaho State Director John Ruhs. “Every time we construct a fireline around a wildfire using hand tools on the ground, every time we drop fire retardant, and every time we herd a wildfire into a previously burned area, we are using fuel breaks. Through this PEIS we’ll be able to proactively construct fuel breaks where we know we will need them, instead of creating them reactively in responding to wildfires.”

The BLM has extensively documented that fuel breaks, and other types of fuel treatments, are effective. Since 2002, the agency has assessed more than 1,200 fuel breaks and other types of fuel treatments that intersected with wildfires and has found that 78% of them were effective in helping to control wildfires and that 84% of them were effective in helping change fire behavior. 

 

An electronic copy of the Final PEIS and associated documents is available for public review for 30 days on the BLM Land Use Planning and NEPA register at https://go.usa.gov/xnQcG The BLM will issue a Record of Decision after the end of the public review period.

-BLM-

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals. 


Oregon State Police is requesting the public's assistance in the unlawful taking of a bighorn sheep ram in Wallowa County
Oregon State Police - 02/14/20 9:11 AM

Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers are asking for the public’s assistance in locating and apprehending the person(s) responsible for shooting a bighorn sheep ram in Wallowa County near the town of Troy sometime during the week of January 27.

Preliminary investigation revealed that the ram was shot on the Wenaha Wildlife Area along the road leading to the feed sight.  The ram was fitted with a telemetry collar and an ear tag.  The collar and severed ear were the only items left at the scene.

Anyone who may have information that will help identify the suspect(s), is asked to call the Turn In Poachers (TIP) line at (800) 452-7888, OSP(677) or Sergeant Chris Hawkins (541) 963-7575 ext. 4670.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

Or the TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 


Thu. 02/13/20
Damage Assessment Continues, More Resources Available for Umatilla Residents
Umatilla Flood Joint Information Center - 02/13/20 3:15 PM

Umatilla County Flooding Event Updates - Thursday, February 13, 2020

Damage assessment and clean-up continued today in Umatilla County in response to the flooding experienced in the area since February 6. Additional resources have been made available for residents to assist in the clean-up process.  Below is updated resources and information for residents.

Structural Losses and Damage Self Reporting – Form still available for submission by residents
Umatilla County still needs critical information from residents and businesses impacted by the flood who have not already reported their losses and damage. To date, 387 structures have been reported as damaged in some way through the self-reporting system. These reports will be used by the county to document the financial impacts and resource needs of our community. Some may need to fill out multiple forms, which are available in both English and Spanish, depending on the nature of losses:

  1. Damage to structures and property from homeowners, renters and businesses
  2. Business economic losses
  3. Agricultural losses

Forms are available online at www.umatillacounty.net.

Multi Agency Resource Center
Is open today until 8 p.m. at the Pendleton Convention Center located at 1601 Westgate. Those impacted by the flood will have face-to-face assistance on damage reporting and access to information about health, clothing, insurance, pets, among other related services. Those interested in volunteering to help with clean up can visit the Red Cross booth at this event for more information.

Umatilla County Extension Office in Milton-Freewater/Walla Walla River Area
Open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and tomorrow (Friday, February 14) for north county residents to receive assistance on damage reporting and connect to various resources.

Resources for After-Flood Clean-Up

  • Hotline Established - A hotline has been established through February 28, to help connect residents to reputable and vetted relief agencies that will assist in debris clean-up and muck-out services. Response times will vary due to overwhelming need, so please be patient. Please call 844-965-1386 for information.
  • Clean-up Safety – The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has issued information to ensure the safety of our residents as clean-up efforts begin. Link to information at https://deqblog.com/2020/02/13/tips-for-safely-managing-debris-from-flood-damaged-buildings/.
  • Take photos of your damage before clean-up begins for insurance purposes.
  • Permitting Required - Umatilla County urges property owners impacted by recent flooding to be aware that permits are required prior to replacing or making repairs to damaged structures. There are certain permitting requirements for homes located within a flood plain. Learn if your home is in a flood plain at www.msc.fema.gov.
  • Dumpsters Available
    Umatilla County has placed dumpsters for cleaning up flood waste in various locations throughout community. These dumpsters are ONLY for people affected by recent flooding. As dumpster locations are added, they will be posted at www.umatillacounty.net for convenience.

Information will continue to be updated at www.umatillacounty.net.

 


Oregon launches Family Connects, a universally offered home visiting program to support health of newborns, families
Oregon Health Authority - 02/13/20 1:22 PM

EDITORS: A video of Cate Wilcox, manager of the Maternal and Child Health Section at the OHA Public Health Division, discussing Family Connects Oregon is available at https://youtu.be/KRUhg3g5VOs.

Feb. 13, 2020

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon launches Family Connects, a universally offered home visiting program to support health of newborns, families

Statewide initiative is result of Senate Bill 526, passed by 2019 Oregon Legislature

PORTLAND, Ore. — Families in eight Oregon communities will be among the first in the state to have the option of receiving nurse home visits after the birth of a child.

These early-adopter communities are part of the Oregon Health Authority’s debut of a national model, Family Connects, under which the state’s new universally offered nurse home visiting initiative will be rolled out. Family Connects is a voluntary, evidence-based model that supports children and families at a critical time: a child’s birth.

The state’s program, to be called Family Connects Oregon, identifies what families want from local resources, and then provides an individualized pathway into a community system of care, the array of services that are coordinated to work for families. This system includes referrals to other, more established home visiting programs in the community that are eligibility-based rather than universally offered to all, as the comprehensive Family Connects program will be.

Health and social supports available to nurse home visiting users around the state include access to obstetricians and primary care providers, pediatricians and family practice physicians, as well as mental health services, housing agencies and lactation support organizations.

Services are intended to improve outcomes in one or more of the following areas: child health; child development and school readiness; family economic self-sufficiency; maternal health; positive parenting; reducing child mistreatment; reducing juvenile delinquency; reducing family violence; and reducing crime.

The Oregon Legislature passed Senate Bill 526 during the 2019 session, directing OHA to design, implement and maintain a voluntary statewide program to provide universal nurse home visiting services to all families with newborns living in the state. Family Connects meets criteria established by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for an evidence-based early childhood home visiting service delivery model. Services will be offered to families caring for newborns up to age 6 months, including foster and adoptive newborns, in the families’ homes by state-licensed registered nurses.

“Creating a lifetime of physical and mental well-being and healthy relationships relies upon a safe and healthy environment provided during early childhood,” said Lillian Shirley, director of the OHA Public Health Division. “That’s the goal of Family Connects Oregon: Give children and their families a jump-start at health during the most important period of their lives.”

Family Connects Oregon does not replace any home visiting programs that are already operating throughout the state. Instead, the program enhances Oregon’s current home visiting programs and will contribute to aligning a home visiting service system that connects all families with services and supports of their choice.

Under the Family Connects Oregon model, every new Oregon parent of a newborn will be contacted by a health care provider shortly after birth, ideally face to face, to schedule a home visit. If families choose to accept this service, they then receive one to three visits by a registered nurse in their homes to help them get off to a good start and get connected to services they want.

A group of single- and multi-county communities led by local public health and/or Early Learning Hubs has been selected to participate in an early adoption phase of Family Connects Oregon. This group represents a diverse mix of geography, implementation approach, strengths and opportunities across Oregon.

The following agencies and communities are designated as the lead agency for planning and implementation:

  • Clatsop County Department of Public Health.
  • Eastern Oregon Early Learning Hub, a consortium covering three counties — Baker, Malheur and Wallowa — with members representing health, K-12 education, social services, early learning programs and businesses.
  • The Early Learning Hub of Central Oregon, a partnership between Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties’ public health departments, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Health & Human Services, and regional early care and education stakeholders.
  • Four Rivers Early Learning Hub, including Gilliam, Hood River, Sherman, Wasco and Wheeler counties.
  • Lane County Health and Human Services Department, Public Health Division.
  • The Early Learning Hub of Linn, Benton & Lincoln Counties.
  • Marion & Polk Early Learning Hub, including Marion County Public Health, Polk County Public Health, Family Building Blocks/Healthy Families, Lancaster Family Medical, and Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde.
  • Washington County Public Health Maternal Child & Reproductive Health.

These early adopters will provide lessons learned and best practices for subsequent cohorts as the program rolls out statewide.

“We want Oregon to be the best place in the country to have and raise a child,” said Cate Wilcox, manager of the Maternal and Child Health Section at the OHA Public Health Division.

For more information, visit healthoregon.org/homevisiting.


Plan for opening OR204 (Weston to Elgin Highway) to one lane in the works
ODOT: East. Ore. - 02/13/20 11:56 AM

OR204 (Weston-Elgin Highway) is currently closed from MP 26.7 at Summerville Road to MP 37.4 at Andes Prairie due to slide activity and erosion that has washed out part of the road and shoulders.  Our engineers have been working to determine the extent of highway stability and damages. The goal is to open one lane for passenger vehicles only (under 10,000 GVW) and pilot traffic through the area as soon as it’s safe to do so.  This pilot operation is expected to continue through the winter and spring months, as the road cannot be properly restored until after the snow melts. The weather forecast for the area is predicting another 2 feet of snow this weekend making the evaluation of damage and repairs difficult.

We awarded a contract to restore drainage and protect the remaining road infrastructure and they are starting work today.  

An additional contractor will provide traffic control with pilot car services through the damaged highway section once a safe route through the work zone is identified.  The pilot car operation is complicated by snow removal activities, contractor repair work, and a steep highway grade along the creek with multiple chain up areas.

Please be patient and expect delay of 30-40 minutes, or more, as the work zone is about 10 miles long and winter weather will greatly impact single lane travel. 

ONCE THE SINGLE LANE PILOT CAR OPERATION IS ACTIVE, INFORMATION WILL BE POSTED ON TRIPCHECK.COM

 


Repeat Offender Sentenced To 90 Months In Federal Prison For Distributing Methamphetamine
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/13/20 9:54 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Timothy Ray Vance, 54, of Salem, Oregon, was sentenced to 90 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for distributing large quantities of methamphetamine throughout Marion County.

Vance has a long criminal history dating back to 1983. Vance served more than 20 years in prison after being convicted in Marion County Circuit Court in 1994 on two counts of robbery, two counts of burglary, and one count each of kidnapping and theft.

Two months after completing post-prison supervision, in August 2018, Vance was found to be involved in a large methamphetamine distribution network. By October 2018, investigators discovered the network’s source of supply and at least one informant who revealed they had purchased methamphetamine from Vance on ten different occasions.  A different informant told investigators that on one occasion, Vance sold them one pound of methamphetamine for $3,200.

In February 2019, Salem Police Department executed a search warrant on Vance’s residence. Investigators located 62.7 grams of methamphetamine, $2,780 in cash, drug packaging materials, and two handguns. Vance was placed under arrest and later released.

In March 2019, investigators learned that Vance was dealing methamphetamine out of a Salem hotel room. Officers conducted a traffic stop of Vance after obtaining a search warrant on his vehicle. During the search, they found 443 grams of methamphetamine, $1,500 in cash, and two additional firearms.

On November 11, 2019, Vance pleaded guilty to one count of possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine. As part of his plea agreement, Vance agreed to abandon four firearms used to facilitate his crime.

This case was investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and the Salem Police Department. It was prosecuted by Lewis S. Burkhart, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

ATV Grant Subcommittee meets February 26-27 in Salem
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 02/13/20 7:00 AM

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s (OPRD) All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Grant Subcommittee will meet at 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Feb. 26 and 8 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Feb. 27 in the Mill Creek Meeting Room, Best Western-Mill Creek Inn 3125 Ryan Drive SE, Salem. The meetings are open to the public.  

On Feb. 26, the Subcommittee will review program updates in the morning, then hear grant request presentations beginning 12:20 p.m. Presentations will continue Feb. 27, beginning 8 a.m. and concluding later that morning. The Subcommittee will then tally final presentation scores and prepare their recommendations.

View the full two-day meeting agenda online on the state ATV website.

The Subcommittee will provide recommendations on grant funding to the OPRD director, who will then refer the recommendations to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission for final approval.

Grant requests for 2020 include projects related to: ATV operation and maintenance, law enforcement, development, and emergency medical services.

The ATV Grant Program provides funding statewide for Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) recreation. Grant funds come from ATV user permit sales and a percentage of gasoline tax money.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals who require special accommodations to attend should contact Ian Caldwell, OPRD ATV program coordinator, at least three days in advance: Ian.Caldwell@oregon.gov or 541-410-5512.


Wed. 02/12/20
395th Basic Police Class to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/12/20 4:06 PM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 395th Basic Police Class.

The Basic Police Class is 16-weeks in length and includes dozens of training areas including survival skills, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, ethics, cultural diversity, problem solving, community policing, elder abuse, drug recognition, and dozens of other subjects.

Basic Police Class 395 will graduate at the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE in Salem, Oregon on Friday, February 14, 2020 at 11:00 a.m. with a reception immediately following the graduation.  Chief John Teague with the Keizer Police Department will be the speaker. 


The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Police #BP395 on their successful completion of basic training.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Graduating members of BP395:

 

Police Officer Mohamed Afdup

Portland Police Bureau

 

Deputy Sheriff Kyle Beam

Columbia County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Tristian Brown

Douglas County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Nathan Diebel

Corvallis Police Department

 

Police Officer Joshua Garvin

Forest Grove Police Department

 

Police Officer Sara Gibbons

Portland Police Bureau

 

Police Officer Bradley Hans

Keizer Police Department

 

Police Officer Jared Hansen

McMinnville Police Department

 

Police Officer Cleo Harvey

Medford Police Department

 

Police Officer Jefferey Hillhouse

Molalla Police Department

 

Police Officer Mason Hirahara

Portland Police Bureau

 

Police Officer David Interian-Pacho

Portland Police Bureau

 

Police Officer Harrison Jarrett

Corvallis Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Todd Kibble

Washington County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Karly Kuiper

Portland Police Bureau

 

Deputy Sheriff Darryl Lewis

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Kyle Lipscomb

Medford Police Department

 

Police Officer Jonathan Lorenz

Portland Police Bureau

 

Police Officer Bryan Lucero

Portland Police Bureau

 

Police Officer Ruben Martinez

Monmouth Police Department

 

Police Officer Christopher Moreland

Albany Police Department

 

Police Officer Scott Nado

Bend Police Department

 

Police Officer Felipe Pedro-Lopez

Portland Police Bureau

 

Police Officer Daphne Plumeau

Forest Grove Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Rachael Poore

Linn County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Kaitlyn Scott

Forest Grove Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Isaac Shumaker

Polk County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Nautique Simpson

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Gerbis Soler-Gonzalez

Portland Police Bureau

 

Police Officer Christopher Sparks

Coos Bay Police Department

 

Police Officer Andrew Taylor

Dallas Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Joshua Tribby

Marion County Sheriff's Office

 

Police Officer Cassidy Walters

Central Point Police Department

 

Police Officer Douglas Wheeler

Rainier Police Department

 

Police Officer Ian Wingo

Lebanon Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Nathan Witherspoon

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Kyle Witty

Union County Sheriff's Office

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Patricia Patrick-Joling, public citizen representative, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


ATV Advisory Committee meets Feb. 26 in Salem
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 02/12/20 2:00 PM

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s (OPRD) All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Advisory Committee will meet 10:45 - 11:50 a.m. Feb. 26 in the Mill Creek Meeting Room, Best Western-Mill Creek Inn, 3125 Ryan Drive SE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.  

The sole agenda item is a review of legislative concepts, including ATV Safety Cards, the new Class IV ATV designation and highway access routes. View the full agenda online on the state ATV website.

The ATV Advisory Committee consists of 17 members who represent various state and federal agencies along with several user groups.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals who need special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Jeff Trejo, OPRD ATV safety education coordinator, at least 72 hours in advance: ejo@oregon.gov">jeff.trejo@oregon.gov or 503-986-0585.


Oregon OSHA faults, fines companies in fatal accident at site of music festival (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/12/20 1:51 PM
Accident photo
Accident photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-02/1073/131497/thumb_Overturned_boom_lift.JPG

(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has issued $31,000 in fines against two companies for safety violations following an investigation of a boom lift accident that killed two workers at the site of the Pickathon Music Festival in Happy Valley.

The division’s investigation of the Aug. 8, 2019, accident found Pickathon LLC and GuildWorks LLC – a subcontractor to Pickathon LLC – failed to follow safety rules governing the operation of a boom lift. Those rules included keeping safety alarm devices activated and heeding the manufacturer’s operating and maintenance instructions for the machine.

“It is an employer’s responsibility to make sure that safety rules are followed for the very purpose of protecting workers from such tragedies,” said Michael Wood, administrator for Oregon OSHA. “This is a time to pause and remember that two people died, leaving behind family and friends. And it is a time to remind ourselves that this accident was entirely preventable.”

The two workers – positioned in the platform of a boom lift raised about 40 feet high – were performing tasks after the music festival had ended. They were dismantling event-related hardware and ropes attached to trees when the boom lift tipped over, crashing to the ground and killing them.  

Oregon OSHA cited both Pickathon and GuildWorks for a serious violation because two alarm devices on the boom lift had been disabled. One device would sound an alarm warning against operating the machine on uneven terrain. The other device would stop the upward motion of the platform if an employee became pinned between an overhead obstruction and the platform’s railing and controls.

That serious violation carries a $12,500 penalty for each of the companies.

Additionally, Oregon OSHA fined GuildWorks $6,000 for another serious violation: failing to follow the boom lift manufacturer’s operating and maintenance instructions.

Those instructions included not raising the boom while on an uneven surface; maintaining a firm footing on the platform’s floor at all times; not moving the machine while the boom was extended and while the machine was stationed on a sloped surface; and not putting the boom in a raised position while the counterweight – which acts as a balance – is located on the downward side of a slope.

Using its discretionary penalty authority, Oregon OSHA determined that the companies will not receive the normal reduction in the penalty granted to small employers. This decision is based on the particular facts uncovered by the division’s investigation, which revealed a history of failing to follow proper safety procedures.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers resources to help improve workplace safety and health.

Contact Oregon OSHA’s no-cost consultation services for help with safety and health programs:

Phone: 503-378-3272

Toll-free in Oregon: 800-922-2689

Field office locations and phone numbers: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/maps.aspx

Email: consult.web@oregon.gov

The agency’s technical staff members can answer questions about rules and how to apply them:

Phone: 503-378-3272

Toll-free in Oregon: 800-922-2689

Email: tech.web@oregon.gov

Online contact form: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/Contact-Technical.aspx

Visit Oregon OSHA’s A-to-Z topic page for more information about on-the-job safety and health: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/az-index.aspx

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 




Attached Media Files: Accident photo

Thousands of Girl Scout Cookie Booths Open February 14 -- NEW Girl Scout Lemon-Ups(TM) cookies make their debut! (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington - 02/12/20 1:03 PM
GSOSW Cookie Boss
GSOSW Cookie Boss
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-02/6250/131495/thumb_LaKayla__and__Aaliyah-5.jpg

Media Contacts

Sarah Shipe, Director of Communications

503-977-6861, Office | 503-930-5275, Mobile | After Hours 800-626-6543 | sshipe@girlscoutsosw.org

Maureen A. Kenney, Public Relations and Advocacy Manager

503 977-6817, Office | mkenney@girlscoutsosw.org

Thousands of Girl Scout Cookie Booths Open February 14 -- NEW Girl Scout Lemon-Ups™ cookies make their debut!

PORTLAND, OR. – February 12, 2020 – Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington (GSOSW) is about to launch the 2020 Girl Scout Cookie booth season. Lemon-Ups™, crispy lemon cookies baked with messages inspired by Girl Scout entrepreneurs such as “I am a go-getter” and “I am an innovator”, will make their official debut! Cookies can be purchased from more than 30,000 Girl Scout Cookie booths from Friday, February 14 through Sunday, March 8, 2020.

“The Girl Scout Cookie Program is so much more than meets the eye. It teaches valuable life skills and helps girls build that entrepreneurial mindset,” says Director of Communications, Sarah Shipe. “As they run their cookie booth—essentially their own cookie business—girls are building confidence, curiosity and an eye for innovation. These skills lead to academic success and workforce readiness in all kinds of careers—especially those where women are underrepresented.”

COOKIE FINDER

Signature Girl Scout Cookies, including Thin Mints®, Samoas®, Trefoils® and new Lemon-Ups™ will be offered among the eight Girl Scout Cookie varieties at all booths throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington. Girl Scout S’mores™ cookies and gluten free Toffee-tastic™ specialty cookies are available at select cookie booths while supplies last. Customers can find a Girl Scout Cookie booth near their location with the Cookie Finder at girlscoutsosw.org/cookies or use the Girl Scout Cookie Finder app available for iPhone or Android.

THE POWER BEHIND THE GIRL SCOUT COOKIE PROGRAM

The Girl Scout Cookie Program teaches girls the skills they need to become effective leaders, manage finances and gain confidence in handling money—skills that will stay with them for a lifetime. Each box of Girl Scout Cookies sold powers real-life experiences for thousands of local girls.

KEEPING IT LOCAL

100 percent of the net revenue earned from cookie sales remains within the local region. Every purchase of Girl Scout Cookies helps provide for new and unique opportunities for local girls including valuable educational experiences that offer lifelong impact. Girl Scout campers in Oregon and Southwest Washington use cookie program proceeds to fund their own camp and travel adventures. And, nearly every Girl Scout troop uses some portion of their cookie proceeds to give back to their local communities.

COOKIE BOOTH SALES AND COOKIE FINDER

Girl Scouts will sell cookies at booths in front of local retailers throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington from February 14 through March 8, 2020. Customers can find a Girl Scout Cookie booth near their location with the Cookie Finder at girlscoutsosw.org or use the Girl Scout Cookie Finder app available for iPhone or Android.

ABOUT THE GIRL SCOUT COOKIE PROGRAM

A little more than a century ago, girls began participating in what would evolve into the largest entrepreneurial training program for girls in the world: the Girl Scout Cookie Program. To learn more about the history of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, please visit girlscoutcookies.org.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON

In partnership with more than 8,000 adult members, Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington prepares 14,500 girls in grades K-12 for a lifetime of leadership, adventure and success. GSOSW’s programs in civic engagement, financial literacy, the outdoors and STEM serve girls in 35 counties in Oregon, and Clark, Klickitat and Skamania counties in Southwest Washington. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

###




Attached Media Files: GS Cookie Program Fact Sheet , GSOSW 2020 Booth Sales Press Release , GSOSW Cookie Boss , Girl Scout Cookie Boss , Girl Scout Money Skills , GSOSW Cookie Booth Girl Scout Cookie Boss , Cookie Booth Two Girl Scouts , Cookie Booth with Girl Scout Dad , Lemon-Ups Cookie , Lemon-Ups Package

Preparing for Peace Keeping (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 02/12/20 10:17 AM
2020-02/962/131478/6089491.jpg
2020-02/962/131478/6089491.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-02/962/131478/thumb_6089491.jpg

First Army
Story by Sgt. Aaron Berogan
Tuesday, February 11, 2020

FORT BLISS, Texas. – Whether it’s blistering hot, freezing cold, or rain soaking from head to toe, nothing is stopping the training of the 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Oregon National Guard as they prepare to assume duties with NATO’s Kosovo Force mission.

The unit is preparing for a peacekeeping mission in Kosovo, a mission very different than the training for combat most of the Guard Soldiers of this Infantry battalion have previously experienced. First Army Observer Coach/Trainers were with them every step of the way to evaluate their progress in this new dynamic.

“It’s pretty exciting to me,” Sgt. Patrick Gunn, assistant to team lead for the Liaison Monitoring Team, 2nd Bn., 162nd Inf. Regt. “This is the deployment I am definitely looking the most forward to. I’ve never done this before and I’m looking forward to the mission, working with foreign militaries, and being part of NATO.”

The Kosovo Force, or KFOR, mission has existed since 1999. Originally set up following the end of NATO’s 78-day air campaign, which aimed to push Yugoslavian forces out of Kosovo, KFOR is made up of nearly 4,000 troops from 28 different countries. KFOR is currently deployed in the Balkans to maintain a safe and secure environment, freedom of movement for all citizens in Kosovo and to facilitate the Euro-Atlantic integration of the Western Balkans. The United Nations, the European Union and other international actors continue to support the development of a stable, democratic, multi-ethnic and peaceful Kosovo.

To this end, the transition from a combat environment to a peacekeeping role requires an approach that emphasizes integration of forces with the local populace.

“I’ve deployed twice before to Iraq and Afghanistan,” explained Gunn. “This is a completely different role, completely different mindset. We are going to Kosovo to blend into the community, to be a part of the population and talking to them versus a combat role. This is nothing that I’ve done before.”

During this process members of the unit are being split into two different teams. One team’s training mirrors the mission they will have patrolling what is known as Kosovo’s Administrative Boundary Line that separates Kosovo from Serbia. There, teams set up entry control points and ensure that there is safety and security as well as freedom of movement for the citizens of Kosovo. The second team is called a Liaison Monitoring Team. This team will do what are called “pulse patrols.” These patrols go from location to location to interact with the residents of Kosovo and help with any humanitarian needs.   

With the unit split evenly between Soldiers who have deployed before and those who haven’t, Gunn’s experience is a resource for Soldiers such as First Lt. Parker Mooney, giving him the comfortability to focus on the mission at hand.
 
“Every day as I learn more about the mission, I get more excited,” said Mooney, Liaison Monitoring Team Officer in Charge, 2nd Bn., 162nd Inf. Regt. “I’m kind of at the point where I just want to be over there. I feel like as I have talked to family, most don’t know where Kosovo is located. But as part of the LMT we get to be in the community and see the change of positive impact.”

As with any overseas deployment, families are foremost in the minds of these Citizen-Soldiers. Sgt. Cody Clyde, team leader for the Liaison Monitoring Team, 2nd Bn., 162nd Inf. Regt., says despite the time away from his family, their mutual sacrifice can serve as an inspiration to his children to live a life that serves others. Clyde has been serving for ten years, with this being his second deployment, serving past his initial enlistment contract to continue that model of service.

“I want to be an example to my children,” explained Clyde. “I want them to see me put on the uniform, and when they are older I hope they are proud. I hope it inspires them to go into some service to the country, whether it’s military or Peace Corps. I want them to seek opportunities to go out and do things for their communities.”

Building Strong Bonds of Partnership

The partnership between First Army and the 2nd Bn., 162nd Inf. Regt., for KFOR has been a strong bond built over more than year.

“We start early to build rapport and trust,” said Capt. Jeremy Kinder, Bravo Team Chief, Observer Coach/Trainer, 2nd Battalion 357 Infantry Regiment, 189th Combined Arms Training Brigade, First Army. “We want them to know we have their best interests at heart and will help make them successful. We learn about them inside and out. We know their friction points and where they shine. Whether it’s Active, Guard, or Reserve, we are one Army, one fight.”

The attention to detail in training that First Army offers with training has been noticed by their partners.

“I think First Army has done a really great job of identifying and focusing on the key points of what everybody’s roles will be overseas,” explained Gunn. “They have been ensuring we are ready for those jobs, and anything extra that may come our way, so we can do our mission and come home safely.”

Clyde’s bond with First Army go back even further.
 
“In both deployments First Army has been the validators and mentors for my units training,” explained Clyde. “They have been very good at helping us shine where we are strong and help us strengthen our shortcomings. It’s clear they want us to be successful as we go to deploy overseas and they focus on us being mission-ready before we leave.”

For Mooney, the partnership he has noticed with First Army has been a positive one.

“This has been my first interaction with First Army,” said Mooney. “They adapt to our needs as our strengths and weaknesses appear. They do what it takes to make us shine and tighten up anything we may need so we get the most effective training.”

This attention to detail stands out because it wasn’t always this way before a deployment.

“In previous deployments the first time we ever saw any partnership or mentorship was late in the game at a mobilization site,” said Lt. Col. Kyle Akers, Battalion Commander, 2nd Bn., 162nd Inf. Regt. “With First Army they have been with us since we were identified for this mission more than a year ago. They helped us forecast what was coming our way so we could maximize training and benefit our Soldiers.”

Because they have had mentorship from not only First Army, but from the 1st Battalion, 297th Infantry Regiment of the Alaska National Guard, which the unit will replace, Akers feels confident in the roles of his teams in Kosovo.

Being National Guard, many of the Soldiers believe they are bringing some helpful skill sets from their civilian careers into this specific mission. Gunn is a security contractor in his civilian career, which he believes helped him develop skills to interact with the local populace in Kosovo during patrols.

“That’s what makes the Guard unique in a lot of ways,” explained Gunn. “I know there are a lot of unique skill sets in our teams that are going to be an added bonus for this deployment.”

Mooney also believes his civilian career, which involves a lot of planning, forward thinking, and interacting with people will help him achieve success as the Officer-in-Charge of the Liaison Monitoring Team.

“My skill sets I developed as a sales executive are playing right into that,” said Mooney. “The planning aspect and comfortability of talking with people, identifying their needs, and developing deeper levels of connection will be very helpful.”

The 2nd Bn., 162nd Inf. Regt. is deploying with their brigade headquarters 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Oregon National Guard.

#Photo Captions#

6089481- A Soldier of the 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Oregon National Guard, walks a perimeter road of the training range at Fort Bliss, Texas. The training at Fort Bliss was preparing all the battalions under the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, a National Guard Brigade from Oregon, for their deployment to Kosovo as part of the Kosovo Force mission (KFOR). First Army participated as the Observer Coach/Trainers for the 41st IBCT, to ensure they had the training necessary to safely deploy, complete their mission, and return home safely. (Photo by Sgt. Aaron Berogan, First Army Public Affairs)

6089482- Specialist Tanner York, Riflemen, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 2-162nd Infantry Battalion, Delta Company, 2nd Platoon, Oregon National Guard, makes a radio call in to his command team about an approaching vehicle to the entry control point during an exercise at Fort Bliss, Texas. The 2-162nd IB was split into two teams during the training at Fort Bliss, which mirrors how they will be dispersed in Kosovo. One team will be absorbed by a Liaison Monitoring Team, which will interact with the citizens in Kosovo, and the other  will patrol Kosovo's Administrative Boundary Line.

6089485- Soldiers of the 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Oregon National Guard, walk roads at Fort Bliss, Texas, during a patrol training exercise. The Kosovo Force mission exists with NATO in order to maintain and safe and secure environment with freedom of movement for all. The exercises mirrored some of the conditions the 2-162nd may face while in Kosovo and patrolling roads. (Photo by Sgt. Aaron Berogan, First Army Public Affairs)

6089487- Soldiers of the 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Oregon National Guard, await the landing of helicopter. The Solders are at Fort Bliss, Texas training with First Army for their deployment to Kosovo as part of the Kosovo Force mission (KFOR). KFOR was established by NATO in June of 1999, following the end of the 78-day air campaign. The 78-day air campaign, commonly referred to as “Operation Noble Anvil,” led to an agreement reached of Yugoslav armed forces pulling out of Kosovo. KFOR was put in place as a peace keeping mission that deters any idea of renewed hostility or threats against Kosovo by Yugoslav and Serb forces, creates a secure environment and ensures public safety, demilitarized the Kosovo Liberation Army, supports the international humanitarian effort, and coordinate with the international civil presence. (Photo by Sgt. Aaron Berogan, First Army Public Affairs)

6089488- Specialist Ethan Welch, a  Rifleman with  Delta Company, 2nd Platoon, 2nd Bn., 162nd Infantry Regt.,  41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Oregon National Guard, uses the Advanced Combat Optical Gunsight (ACOG) to watch for anything suspicious during a training exercise at Fort Bliss, Texas. Welch will help patrol the Administration Boundary Line during the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team’s time as part of the Kosovo Force mission.

6089491- A First Army Observer Coach/Trainer watches as Soldiers of the 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Oregon National Guard, makes plans for their next movement during their patrol at Fort Bliss, Texas. The patrols that were created by First Army OC/T’s were designed to mirror real life situations that the 2nd Bn., 162nd Inf Regt. will come across during their time in Kosovo as part of the Kosovo Force mission. First Army has been partnered with the 2nd Bn., 162nd Inf. Regt. since for more than a year. This partnership is put in place to ensure these National Guard Soldiers are prepared for any challenges they may face during a deployment. This also mirrors the training Active Duty units go through with a third party to ensure all Warrior Tasks and Mission Essential Tasks are completed correctly so Soldiers can complete their missions and come home safely. (Photo by Sgt. Aaron Berogan, First Army Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 2020-02/962/131478/6089491.jpg , 2020-02/962/131478/6089488.jpg , 2020-02/962/131478/6089487.jpg , 2020-02/962/131478/6089485.jpg , 2020-02/962/131478/6089482.jpg , 2020-02/962/131478/6089481.jpg

Multi Agency Resource Center to Open Thursday for Those Impacted by Flooding
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 02/12/20 9:15 AM

Pendleton, Ore. Feb. 12, 2020 – The Red Cross Cascades Region, Worksource Eastern Oregon and CAPECO are partnering together to provide a Multi Agency Resource Center for those impacted by recent flooding.

This free event will be hosted Thursday, Feb. 13 from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Pendleton Convention Center, 1601 Westgate, Pendleton, OR 97801.

Support services will be available for the following:

  • Filing for Unemployment
  • Finding Housing
  • Clean-up / Muck-out Supplies
  • Document Replacement
  • Insurance Questions
  • Free Clothing Thrift Store On-site

Individuals are asked to please bring a proof of residence such as: driver’s license or ID card, mail with current address, rental lease or other identification.

For those in need of transportation, please call Let’er Bus Transit at (541) 276-6476.

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/RedCrossCascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades.




Attached Media Files: 2020-02/1190/131476/MARC_Flyer_FINAL.pdf

Hold on to your balloons!
Pacific Power - 02/12/20 8:47 AM

Contact:  Pacific Power media hotline                       FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

               1-800-570-5838                                           Feb. 12, 2020

 

Hold on to your balloons!
With celebrations from Valentine’s Day to Mardi Gras at hand, Pacific Power reminds that balloons don’t mix with power lines

PORTLAND, Ore. – Balloons capture the imagination with their aspirational upward drift. But their lighter-than-air quality can get out of hand, literally, and have unintended consequences for the power grid

 

“Balloons may seem like small things,” said Joe Cissna, Pacific Power’s director of safety and training. “But when escaped balloons touch power lines or substations, even the smallest amount of metal content material can conduct electricity. This can interfere with lines, causing power fluctuations and outages.”

 

In 2019, Pacific Power recorded 22 instances where balloons caused outages somewhere in the three states the company serves. Each year since 2015, balloons caused between 20 and 30 outages, roughly the same number of outages as those caused by lighting.

 

“While this may not seem like very many events,” Cissna said, “unlike lightning-caused outages, these are preventable. If we can keep customers from being inconvenienced by asking people to be more careful in how they handle balloons, we’ll do it.”

 

There are steps you can take to help minimize the potential dangers:

 

  • Keep the balloons indoors where they can’t rise into overhead power lines or drift into contact with transformers or substations.

 

  • Make sure the string for each balloon is securely attached and short enough to control its direction.

 

  • Attach a weight to the balloon’s string so it cannot float away; and never intentionally release metallic balloons.

 

  • Deflate balloons after the holiday and keep as a memento or dispose of properly. Birds and squirrels have been known to carry balloon remnants onto lines.

 

  • Never chase a loose balloon across streets or attempt to retrieve a balloon from a power line or substation. 

 

  • If you notice a balloon near a power line, do not try to retrieve it. Report it to Pacific Power by calling 1-888-222-7070 anytime.

 

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About Pacific Power

Pacific Power is headquartered in Portland and provides electric service to almost 770,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. As part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, Pacific Power and Rocky Mountain Power provide approximately 1.9 million customers in six western states with reliable, efficient energy. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment.


Richland Facilities Closed on Monday
City of Richland - 02/12/20 8:45 AM

City of Richland facilities will close on Monday, February 17 in honor of Presidents Day. Trash collection will continue as normal. 


Tue. 02/11/20
Critical Damage Assessment Information Needed; AlertSense Public Notification Planned
Umatilla Flood Joint Information Center - 02/11/20 3:29 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                  

February 11, 2020

NOTE TO MEDIA:

  • Information about reporting damage to homes and businesses is urgent and critical. Reports should be filed with Umatilla County by noon Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020.
  • A public alert on the reporting process will be sent this afternoon or evening. Details below.

Critical Damage Assessment Information Needed

Umatilla County needs critical information from residents and businesses impacted by the flood regarding three elements of losses. These reports will be used by the county to document the financial impacts and resources needs of our communities. Some people affected by the flood may need to fill out multiple forms depending on the nature of their losses.

These reports include:

  1. Damage to structures and property from homeowners, renters and businesses.
  2. Business economic losses.
  3. Agriculture losses.

To find the forms and instructions for reporting damages, go to the Umatilla County website, scroll down to the flood link for access to all the documents: co.umatilla.or.us

IMPORTANT NOTE:

AlertSense: Umatilla County will distribute an AlertSense public notification by text and email asking residents and business owners to complete online damage assessment forms. The message will be sent to those registered to receive the notifications in the areas affected by the flood.

Businesses and individuals who need assistance completing or submitting reports may reach out to the following locations during business hours:

  • Pendleton City Hall
  • Milton-Freewater Public Library
  • Umatilla Public Library,
  • Umatilla County Sheriff’s Office
  • Echo City Hall
  • Weston City Hall

or call the Umatilla County Flood Information Line: 541-966-3671. (Staffing limited.)

Cash Donations: Cash donations are being accepted by three local community organizations

  • Umatilla County/Pendleton region: Community Action Plan of East Central Oregon (CAPECO). Donate through the website. 800-752-1139
  • Milton-Freewater: Blue Mountain Community Foundation: Donate through the website. 509-529-4371
  • Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation: Send a check to: CTUIR (Attn: Accounts Receivable), 46411 Timine Way, Pendleton, OR 97801 (New today, Tuesday, Feb. 11.)

Tuesday, Feb. 11:

  • Umatilla County crews are assessing flooding debris and will determine the best process for the clean-up, including allocation of dumpsters.
  • The Oregon Department of Land and Conservation are training staff from the Umatilla County Planning Department and local cities in damage assessment. Water can create severe structural damage. This step is required for compliance with the National Flood Insurance Program.
  • County crews will inspect dams and levees in Pendleton and Milton-Freewater for damage.
  • Umatilla County will begin inspecting the heavy damage to Mill Creek Road. 
  • ODOT bridge crews will assist with bridge inspections.

Ongoing

  • Crews will continue recovery efforts throughout the area, including damage assessment, planning and repairs. 
  • Search and Rescue operations are on standby.
  • Short-term sheltering and associated needs for evacuated or displaced residents.

County Roads

  • Sections of Walla Walla River Road, Mill Creek Road and Bingham Road remain closed to vehicle traffic. Use TripCheck.com for the latest updates on county road and state highway closures.
  • OR Highway 204, the Tollgate Highway, remains closed between milepost 26.7 (Andes Prairie) and milepost 37.4 (Summerville Road).

Background

  • On Thursday Feb. 6, heavy rain and snow melt caused by warm temperatures brought flooding to many areas of Umatilla County.
  • A helicopter tour Monday Feb. 10 revealed multiple bridges out, road sections gone and homes isolated. 
  • During the flooding, the Oregon Army National Guard used helicopters to rescue 54 people, 10 dogs, one cat and one rabbit stranded by the flood. 
  • One woman was killed when high water swept through her property near the Bar M Ranch, the only reported fatality in the flooding.
  • High water and road damage closed Interstate 84 in both directions Friday Feb. 7 between Exits 182 and 188. One lane in each direction opened late Sunday night, Feb. 9. 

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MEDIA ALERT - Dayton Superintendent Selected (Photo)
ESD 123 - 02/11/20 12:54 PM
Mr. Guy Strot, incoming superintendent for Dayton School District
Mr. Guy Strot, incoming superintendent for Dayton School District
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-02/1212/131452/thumb_Strot_Guy_Bell_Picture.JPG

DAYTON, WA – Following last night’s final interviews with community and school staff, the Dayton School Board of Directors voted unanimously to offer Guy Strot the position of superintendent, pending contract negotiations. The district will make a formal announcement confirming the finalized contract offer at their upcoming board meeting, scheduled for February 19, 2020.

One of three final candidates, Mr. Strot is joining Dayton School District following the planned retirement of current superintendent, Doug Johnson. Mr. Strot would begin his new position in Dayton effective July 1, 2020.  

Mr. Strot has fourteen years of experience in education, with a Master’s in Teaching from Concordia University. He is currently in his fifth year as a principal at Kalama School District, and previously served as a teacher and principal in the Lind Ritzville Cooperative Schools.

Dayton School District has utilized the services of Educational Service District 123 for their superintendent search.  For more information, contact ESD 123 Superintendent Darcy Weisner at 509.544.5785.

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Attached Media Files: Mr. Guy Strot, incoming superintendent for Dayton School District

Pacific Power offers support for Umatilla County communities affected by flooding
Pacific Power - 02/11/20 12:03 PM

Pacific Power media hotline

1-800-570-5838

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Feb. 11, 2020

 

Pacific Power offers support for Umatilla County communities affected by flooding

 

PENDLETON, Ore. — With flood waters receding, the damage to the Umatilla County community is even more clear. Homes and businesses have been damaged and some lost forever. Pacific Power wants to help local residents get back on their feet and has donated $5,000 to the Community Action Program of East Central Oregon (CAPECO) to help the community recover and stay safe.

 

“By donating to CAPECO, we are partnering with a great organization that will get funds wherever they are needed to help in the recovery effort,” said Lori Wyman, regional business manager. “We are also, working with the county, cities and tribal authorities directly to restore electric service to areas as road are repaired and that becomes possible.”

 

For the many residents returning to flood-damaged home and businesses, Pacific Power offers these tips:

  • Flooded homes and basements can be dangerous: NEVER go into a flooded home or basement unless you are certain the electricity is shut off. If you are unsure whether the power is on or off, call Pacific Power or a professional electrician.
  • If your home was flooded and you do not have sufficient knowledge of electrical wiring and appliances, call a professional electrician. Do not turn on any lights or appliances until an electrician has checked your home for short circuits in appliances, wiring or other electrical equipment.
  • Breakers and fuses: Before resetting breakers or replacing blown fuses, unplug electric appliances if you can do so without standing in water or on a wet surface. Do not check fuses or circuit breakers or operate any electric appliance while standing in water or on a wet surface. Cut off power at the breaker box only if you can do it safely and without standing in water.
  • Do not turn on your own service: If your property sustained damage during the event, before service can be restored, an inspection may be required by city, county or state inspectors or professional electricians or plumbers.
  • To have your service restored after repair and inspection, call Pacific Power at 888-221-7070. Assistance is available 24 hours every day. 

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Bots (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 02/11/20 9:00 AM
TT - Bots - GRAPHIC
TT - Bots - GRAPHIC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/3585/130748/thumb_TT_-_PV_bots_-_GRAPHICS.jpg

The FBI has launched the “Protected Voices” initiative to help 2020 political campaigns and American voters protect against online foreign influence operations and cyber security threats. The Protected Voices campaign includes information and guidance from the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. 

This FBI Portland Tech Tuesday report is adapted from the Protected Voices initiative with a focus on providing cyber security information to political campaigns as well as businesses and individuals in Oregon. More information on all aspects of the initiative, including video downloads, can be found at www.FBI.gov/ProtectedVoices

(Audio) 

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense by understanding how foreign actors use both technology and our emotions to interfere in elections. 

Let’s start with the basics. A “bot” is a program that can simulate human behavior. You likely encounter bots on a regular basis. It can be something as simple as “chatting” with a customer service representative at an online business or asking for help on a shopping site. Today, though, we are going to talk about how foreign actors use bots on social media platforms to drive discord and decision-making. 

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) warns that bots “use artificial intelligence, big data analytics, and other programs or databases to imitate users posting content.” 

The bots start by targeting divisive issues big and small. The issue could be the upcoming election or the appropriate pizza topping. They don’t care about a winning side – it’s all about making people stake out very different positions.  

By getting people to respond, they are able to start building a large following. Once an influencer or a bot network identifies you as someone willing to engage, they often rename accounts and reuse them for multiple issues. 

That large following allows the foreign actors to be effective in spreading misinformation and hate speech, both of which can generate an emotional reaction by those involved in the debate. Feeling anger or extreme satisfaction can cause you to ignore signs of what’s going on and encourage you to like, repost, or share the info to even more people. 

In the end, the foreign actors and their bots impact our ability to have fair and free elections by polluting our political discussions about the candidates and the issues. What can you do? 

Be wary of accounts or profiles where the posts are only working to drive extreme views. Trolls are in it to make you mad – don’t let them. You can also check an account’s activity history. Is it very new? Was it created years ago but started posting a huge volume of content just recently? Has it changed its name repeatedly? Do some basic online research to see if you can determine if that very-American sounding group is really a legitimate organization. 

Finally, if in doubt – take your conversations off-line. Focus on verifiable facts and encourage your friends and family to do the same 

Remember your voice matters, so protect it. Go to www.FBI.gov/ProtectedVoices for more information. 

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Attached Media Files: TT - Bots - AUDIO , TT - Bots - GRAPHIC

80-year-old Oregon man swindled out of $200,000 in elaborate romance scam (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/11/20 8:56 AM
Pic of lion sculpture used in scam
Pic of lion sculpture used in scam
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-02/1073/131432/thumb_Lion_sculpture_made_of_wood_not_marble.JPG

Salem – Valentine’s Day is almost here, love is in the air, and the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation warns, don’t get catfished.

Recently, an 80-year-old widower was catfished out of $200,000. The unidentified fraudster stole a Florida woman’s identity to befriend the Oregonian through an online dating service and persuaded him to send money for a business opportunity.

Over several months, the con artist convinced the elderly man that they were in a long-distance romantic relationship, and proposed an opportunity to support an art gallery in Florida.

The scammer pretended to seek investors to cover $5 million in transportation costs to ship a 500-ton marble lion sculpture from China. The con artist promised that investments would be returned plus a percentage of the profits from the sale of the sculpture.

The widower even received fabricated documents detailing the contract with the museum and bank statements. Relying on the documents and his romantic relationship, the victim made a series of payments over five months to various individuals and overseas bank accounts totaling more than $200,000. 

The widower lost his entire investment and investigators have been unable to locate the scammer.

“Romance scams typically target older individuals, gain their trust, then ask for money through social media and dating websites,” said Andrew Stolfi, division administrator. “Unfortunately, victims often wire funds overseas or to third-party transfer agents, making it difficult to track the money and identify the con artist.”

The division encourages consumers to do their homework before making any investment. Protect yourself from getting catfished or falling for an investment scam by following these tips:

  • Do not send money to anyone you have not met in person, and be cautious about sharing personal or financial information.
  • Do not transfer money to unknown people or intermediaries. If you need to use a third party to send money, use a licensed money transmitter.
  • Keep copies of all communications with scammers and report them to the division, the online dating site, the local police, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Federal Trade Commission.

For more information and tips about investing, visit dfr.oregon.gov/financial/investments. Consumers can also contact the division’s advocates at 888-877-4894 (toll-free) to ask questions, file complaints, or check the license of a company or advisor.

                                                                                                   ###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.

 




Attached Media Files: Pic of lion sculpture used in scam