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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Thu. Oct. 19 - 7:42 am
Wed. 10/18/17
Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet October 20 in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 10/18/17 3:23 PM
October 18, 2017

Contact: Heather Johnson, 503-508-8276, heather.n.johnson@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: Friday, October 20, 9 a.m. to noon. Public testimony will be heard at 9:20 a.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees can also follow the presentation by webinar and listen to discussion by phone. Register for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/312837825839229954. Conference line: 888-204-5984, participant code 1277-166. Phone will be unmuted during public testimony.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda and updates; public testimony; OHA obesity measure proposal; consider 2019 potential change to tobacco prevalence measure; consider potential change to PCPCH measure; finalize recommendation to Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee; future meeting schedule and topics.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/analytics/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:
Sign language and spoken language interpreters
Written materials in other languages
Braille
Large print
Audio and other formats
If you need help or have questions, please contact Heather Johnson at 503-508-8276, 711 TTY, heather.n.johnson@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.
Award recognizes Oregon's return-to-work programs
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/18/17 1:22 PM
(Salem) -- The Oregon Workers' Compensation Division (WCD) has received an award from a worldwide organization for the division's ongoing efforts and track record of success in helping injured Oregon workers return to work.

The International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions -- the largest trade association of workers' compensation agencies in North America -- honored WCD with a 2017 President's Award. Such awards recognize the contributions of regulators and industry professionals in improving workplace health and safety, including helping workers recover from on-the-job injury and illness.

WCD's award, announced by the association during its 103rd annual convention held in Portland this month, recognizes two Oregon programs: the Employer-at-Injury Program and the Preferred Worker Program.

The Employer-at-Injury Program encourages the early return to work of injured workers by helping lower an employer's early return-to-work costs and claim costs. Since 1995, it has helped more than 160,000 injured Oregon workers achieve both long-term employment and wages that are higher than those who did not use the program.

The Preferred Worker Program encourages re-employment of qualified Oregon workers who have permanent disabilities from on-the-job injuries. The program, which focuses on small- to medium-sized businesses, offers Oregon employers a chance to save money by hiring preferred workers. Since 2012, the program has served an average 1,029 newly eligible workers per year.

In putting the spotlight on both programs, the association noted WCD's commitment to continuously improve its services. "While both programs have been successful," according to the association, "Oregon continues to measure the impact and make changes to improve outcomes."

"This award reflects the energy, hard work, and professionalism of all of our staff," said Lou Savage, administrator for WCD. "And we remain committed to what matters most: helping improve the lives of injured workers -- and their families -- in Oregon."

Learn more about WCD's return-to-work programs by visiting http://wcd.oregon.gov/rtw/Pages/index.aspx, calling 800-452-0288 (toll free), or by sending an email to the Employer-at-Injury Program -- Eaip.oregon@oregon.gov -- or the Preferred Worker Program -- Pwp.oregon@oregon.gov.

For more information about the Oregon Workers' Compensation Division, visit http://wcd.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.


###

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
SAIF farm safety seminar Nov. 1 in La Grande
SAIF - 10/18/17 11:35 AM
What: SAIF will be presenting a free half-day seminar on agriculture safety and health.

Who should attend: The seminar is designed primarily for people working in agriculture, but is open to anyone interested in ag safety and health--they don't have to be insured by SAIF.

When: Wednesday, November 1 from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Lunch is included.

Where: The Blue Mountain Conference Center on 404 12th Street in La Grande.

More information: www.saif.com/agseminars
-----
SAIF's free farm safety seminars kick off Oct. 31
Annual seminars visiting 16 cities between now and March.

While agriculture has its fair share of injuries and illnesses, it's not easy for workers and employers to get away from the fields to learn how to reduce risks. That's why SAIF is using the off-season--October through March--to conduct its annual ag safety seminars.

SAIF has presented the free, half-day seminars for more than 20 years. SAIF will be presenting in 16 cities across the state, with a separate Spanish seminar in nine cities.

The full schedule and registration details can be found at saif.com/agseminars.

The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture, but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health--they don't have to be insured by SAIF.

This year, seminars will be held in Bandon, Central Point, Clackamas, Corvallis, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Madras, Ontario, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

Spanish-language seminars will be held in Central Point, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Klamath Falls, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

Each seminar is held from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and includes lunch. The first one will be October 31 in Ontario.

This year's topics include mechanical hazards, ergonomics, safety leadership and communication skills, and the difference between safety and compliance.

Employers with small ag businesses who attend the seminar will meet OSHA's instructional requirement, one of four requirements that exempt small agricultural operations from random OSHA inspections.

The Oregon State Landscaping Contractors Board has approved the seminar for four hours of continuing education credits and the Department of Consumer and Business Services has approved the seminar for four hours of producer continuing education credits.

View the complete schedule or register at saif.com/agseminars. You can also register by calling 800.285.8525.

About SAIF
SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. For more than 100 years, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.
NEWS RELEASE: Tri-Cities Youth & Justice Forum
ESD 123 - 10/18/17 11:32 AM
PASCO, WA -- Students across Southeast Washington will attend the 14th annual Tri-Cities Youth and Justice Forum on Friday, November 3 at Columbia Basin College. This full-day forum teaches middle and high school students about the many professions and resources that make up our justice system, with the principal goal of creating opportunities for racial and ethnic diversity in the justice system to match the people it serves.

This year's theme is "How Science and Technology Can Help Us In Our Quest for Justice." Thanks to a greatly generous $10,000 donation from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the 2017 Forum features a strong emphasis on the integration of technology in the field. The event invites students in grades 8-12 to explore how technology can be used in conjunction with regular law practices to advance justice. Students in attendance will have the opportunity to learn more about using technology, such as social media and apps, to solve crimes, as well as participate in a drone demonstration. Students will also meet with professionals in every area of the justice system, including lawyers, judges, and law enforcement officers.

ESD 123 Prevention Services Director, Dana Camarena, looks forward to co-hosting this event each year and is especially grateful for the contribution by PNNL to strengthen the Forum.

"The annual Youth and Justice Forum is a valuable event for our department in many ways," says Camarena, "especially because the students who attend gain such a deeper understanding of our justice system. It's also a great opportunity to inspire youth to pursue a future career in the justice system."

The forum will be held in the Byron Gjerde Multipurpose Facility (Building H) at CBC, and the event is free for all 8-12th grade students (schools must pre-register). For more information, contact Mireya Onofre, Prevention Services Assistant, at monofre@esd123.org.

###

The Tri-Cities Youth and Justice Forum is sponsored by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Washington State Minority & Justice Commission, Educational Service District 123, Columbia Basin Community College, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and AACCES, with more sponsors to be announced.
FBI Announces Results of National Child Sex Trafficking Operation in Oregon
FBI - Oregon - 10/18/17 11:06 AM
The FBI's Child Exploitation Task Force, working with a number of local and state partner agencies in Oregon, recovered two child sex trafficking victims as part of a national and international operation in the past week. The FBI and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) spearhead the "Operation Cross Country" initiative to recover minor sex trafficking victims and to target the criminal enterprises responsible for the commercial sex trafficking of children.

Across the United States, FBI task forces recovered more than 80 minors and arrested 120 traffickers. In all, 55 FBI field offices working with hundreds of local and state law enforcement partners took part in this, the 11th iteration of Operation Cross Country (OCC). International partners included Canada, the United Kingdom, Thailand, Cambodia and the Philippines.

The Oregon operations resulted in:


PORTLAND
Two minor sex trafficking victims recovered. (One of these two just recently turned 18 but disclosed victimization that began when she was a minor).
Nine adult prostitutes arrested and/or cited. Law enforcement and social service providers offered assistance to all contacted.


EUGENE
Five adult prostitutes contacted. Law enforcement and social service providers offered assistance to all contacted.


SALEM
One arrest - Terrence Martell Williams, age 34, on a state charge of promoting prostitution. Arrested by Salem Police Department.
Six adult prostitutes arrested and/or cited. Law enforcement and social service providers offered assistance to all contacted.


The FBI's victim specialists work with state protective service agencies and social service providers to offer those minors recovered medical assistance, mental health counseling or other support as needed. Adult prostitutes arrested by local law enforcement partners assisting in Operation Cross Country are also given the option to receive social services.

"It can be easy to think that selling sex with children is so corrupt, so depraved that it couldn't possibly happen in my town, my neighborhood, my school. But, as we find out every time we recover a child, these victims are here and their needs are very real," said Loren Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "These kids are everyone's responsibility, and they are counting on us -- the FBI, local law enforcement, the community -- to come together to give them a chance at a life we would all wish for our children."

Nationally and internationally, investigators staged operations in a number of locations, including casinos, hotels and truck stops as well as on street corners and via the Internet. With regards to the Oregon operations, we will not release specifics as to the stings, including their locations, to protect the integrity of future operations.

"We were honored to join this massive effort to hold offenders accountable," said Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts. "We've made child exploitation a major enforcement focus at our agency, with initiatives and partnerships that include our Child Abuse Team, the Inter-agency Child Exploitation Prevention Team (INTERCEPT), A Safe Place Family Justice Center and our annual Child Abuse & Family Violence Summit. We salute the FBI, our deputies and partner agencies in their large-scale effort to bring these individuals to justice."


Oregon law enforcement partner agencies include:
FBI's Child Exploitation Task Force
Portland Police Bureau
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office
Beaverton Police Department
Tigard Police Department
Lake Oswego Police Department
Hillsboro Police Department
Washington County Sheriff's Office
Eugene Police Department
Salem Police Department
Keizer Police Department
Polk County Interagency Narcotics Team (POINT)
Lane County Sheriff's Office
Springfield Police Department
United States Attorney's Office for the District of Oregon


Oregon social service agency partners include:
Safety Compass
Sexual Assault Resource Center (SARC)
Clackamas County District Attorney's Victim Assistance Program
Clackamas County Juvenile Department
Multnomah County Department of Human Services
Washington County Juvenile Department
Marion County District Attorney's Victim Assistance Program
Lane County District Attorney's Victim Assistance Program
Lane County Child Protective Services
Lane County Department of Youth Services
Kids' FIRST Center
Looking Glass

Note: Additional information, b-roll, photos, and interviews associated with this year's operation can be downloaded at www.fbi.gov/occxi
October 20 is International Credit Union Day
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 10/18/17 10:29 AM
Find out why 235 million consumers worldwide, and 3.6 million in Washington, have chosen not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions as their financial services partners.

SEATAC, WA-- If you visit a credit union branch anytime, you'll receive a warm welcome, local service, and better interest rates than most other financial institutions offer. If you visit a credit union branch October 20th you'll feel an even more energized buzz. It's International Credit Union Day, an annual celebration of more than 68,000 credit unions and their 235 million members worldwide.

As not-for-profit financial cooperatives, credit unions provide a viable alternative to profit-driven financial institutions. Credit unions not only offer a plethora of financial services to their member-owners; they are also committed to community service, and are a force for positive economic and social change.

In Washington, 10,000 employees of 90 credit unions serve 3.6 million members across the state, in 521 branch locations, and with 24/7 technology that helps consumers make wise financial decisions.

Since 1948, International Credit Union Day has been celebrated annually on the third Thursday of October. Each year, the international event affords the opportunity to remember credit unions' proud history and promote awareness of and support for the credit union difference. This year's theme, "Dreams Thrive Here," celebrates how credit unions and other financial cooperatives serve as catalysts to make different professions, personal choices, and career paths real.

Interview credit union employees and members in your community on #ICUDay. Please share this video with your audiences so consumers know they have a not-for-profit, cooperative financial services choice: https://vimeo.com/229748075


Attached Media Files: 2017-10/4992/108865/International_Credit_Union_Day_in_Washington.docx
October 20 is International Credit Union Day
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 10/18/17 10:26 AM
Find out why 235 million consumers worldwide, and 2 million in Oregon, have chosen not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions as their financial services partners.

TIGARD, OR. -- If you visit a credit union branch anytime, you'll receive a warm welcome, local service, and better interest rates than most other financial institutions offer. If you visit a credit union branch October 20th you'll feel an even more energized buzz. It's International Credit Union Day, an annual celebration of more than 68,000 credit unions and their 235 million members worldwide.

As not-for-profit financial cooperatives, credit unions provide a viable alternative to profit-driven financial institutions. Credit unions not only offer a plethora of financial services to their member-owners; they are also committed to community service, and are a force for positive economic and social change.

In Oregon, 5,000 employees of 59 credit unions serve 2 million members across the state, in 289 branch locations, and with 24/7 technology that helps consumers make wise financial decisions.

Since 1948, International Credit Union Day has been celebrated annually on the third Thursday of October. Each year, the international event affords the opportunity to remember credit unions' proud history and promote awareness of and support for the credit union difference. This year's theme, "Dreams Thrive Here," celebrates how credit unions and other financial cooperatives serve as catalysts to make different professions, personal choices, and career paths real.

Interview credit union employees and members in your community on #ICUDay. Please share this video with your audiences so consumers know they have a not-for-profit, cooperative financial services choice: https://vimeo.com/229748075





Attached Media Files: 2017-10/4992/108864/International_Credit_Union_Day_in_Oregon.docx
Stakeholder survey affirms Facility Task Force initial facilities improvement needs list
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 10/18/17 9:17 AM
WALLA WALLA -- Parents, community members, employees and students favorably supported the initial needs list and proposed draft solutions identified in a recent public survey developed by the Community Facilities Task Force. Based on staff and community survey engagements last spring, in addition to comprehensive facility analysis performed, the Community Facilities Task Force is recommending practical renovations of Walla Walla High School, Lincoln High School, and Pioneer Middle School. Other facility needs across the district like large-scale roofing replacements, heating and cooling system upgrades and life safety improvements have also been identified as priority projects. This latest survey tested the group's initial pragmatic and cost-effective solutions.

A total of 569 people responded to the survey which is part of the community engagement phase of a deliberate two-year process to develop a Long-range Facilities Improvement Plan. Information gathered from this survey will help shape preliminary bond package options the Community Facilities Task Force will present to the school board in December. The school board will then seek further community input on these potential bond packages following winter break before making a final decision in May for a November 2018 bond proposal.

For the past 13 months, the eighteen-member Community Facilities Task Force has completed several studies and initiated extensive research. The district aims to preserve its historic buildings and infrastructure while renovating them to meet current educational needs. Walla Walla voters approved two bonds in the 1980's, three in the 90's and one in the last 18 years. As a result, all existing bond debt will be paid off in December 2018. Any facility improvement projects being proposed in November 2018 are likely to be a replacement of current rates, or a slight increase depending on community input, maintaining one of the lowest school bond rates in the region. The district is also in a position to receive unprecedented state match funding on future facility improvements and is only looking at options which allocate 100% of the state match dollars to the identified projects.

###


Attached Media Files: 2017-10/1288/108859/Fall_Facilities_Survey_for_Web.pdf
Tue. 10/17/17
DPSST Police Policy Committee Meeting scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/17/17 4:22 PM
For Immediate Release
October 17, 2017
Contact: Mona Riesterer
(503) 378-2431


Notice of Regular Meeting
The Police Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 10:00 a.m. on November 16, 2017. The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group. Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.


Agenda Items:

1. Introductions

2. Approve Meeting Minutes
Approve minutes from the August 17, 2017 Police Policy Committee Meeting

3. Approval for Changes to the Basic Police Curriculum
Presented by Staci Yutzie

4. Introduction to the New Denial/Revocation/Suspension Standards
Presented by Linsay Hale

5. Administrative Closures -- Police/Regulatory Specialist
Presented by Katrina Robson


6. McDonald, Rachel DPSST #57760 -- Portland Police Bureau; Application for Training and Subsequent Police Certification
Presented by Katrina Robson

7. Shipley, Joseph DPSST #24794 -- Yamhill County Sheriff's Office; Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Supervisory, and Management Police Certifications
Presented by Katrina Robson

8. Hewitt, Megan DPSST #31385 -- Hillsboro Police Department; Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Supervisory, and Management Police Certifications
Presented by Katrina Robson

9. Plummer, Teresa DPSST #31191 -- DPSST; Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Supervisory, Management, and Executive Police Certifications and Instructor Certification
Presented by Katrina Robson

10. Ames, Zechariah DPSST #42841 -- Oakridge Police Department; Basic Police Certification, Basic Corrections Certification, Basic Telecommunicator Certification, and Basic Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certification
Presented by Katrina Robson

11. Schafer, Bradley DPSST #54285 -- Canby Police Department; Basic Police Certification
Presented by Katrina Robson

12. Ruiz, Jason DPSST # 57553 -- Bend Police Department; Application for Training and Subsequent Police Certification
Presented by Katrina Robson

13. Smith, Clarence DPSST # 10581 -- Basic Intermediate, Advanced & Supervisory Police Certifications
Presented by Katrina Robson

14. Citizen Complaints against Grant County Sheriff Palmer, Glenn DPSST #18276
Presented by Katrina Robson

15. Department Update


16. Next Police Policy Committee Meeting -- February 15, 2018 at 10:00 a.m.

Administrative Announcement
This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Police Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
Update on Oregon fire agencies assisting with California wildfires 17 October 2017 (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 10/17/17 4:18 PM
Deschutes County Strike Team works to protect structures and property on the Southern LNU Complex
Deschutes County Strike Team works to protect structures and property on the Southern LNU Complex
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/1062/108846/thumb_Photo_3_for_17OCT_release.jpeg
As firefighters slowly get the upper hand and weather improves somewhat in northern
California, two Oregon Strike Teams (Marion County and Jackson Josephine counties) are being demobilized today and will head back to their home stations over the next 24 hours.

More Oregon Strike Team demobilizations are in the planning stages if conditions continue to stabilize.

Oregon Strike Teams in southern California will remain deployed as that area is still under a Red Flag Warning and fire officials expect hot, dry weather and significant winds. We expect Oregon resources in that area to remain at least throughout the coming weekend.

Three Oregon Strike Teams (Washington County, Umatilla/Union counties, Linn/Benton counties) have been reassigned to assist with the recently growing Bear Fire in Santa Cruz.

"Oregon's deployed resources have been performing extremely well," said Chief Deputy State Fire Marshal Marian Ruiz-Temple. "We have heard nothing but great things about our Oregon response system and the caliber of our firefighters. All Oregonians can take pride in the effectiveness and professionalism of our deployed men and women."


Attached Media Files: Deschutes County Strike Team works to protect structures and property on the Southern LNU Complex , Dechutes County Strike Team work to protect structures and property on the Southern LNU Complex , Washington County Strike Team receiving orders to leave Prado Staging near Chino and report to the Bear Fire near Santa Cruz.
DPSST Corrections Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/17/17 4:16 PM
For Immediate Release
October
Contact: Mona Riesterer
(503) 378-2431


Notice of Regular Meeting
The Corrections Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 10:00 a.m. on November 14, 2017. The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group. Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1. Introductions

2. Minutes -- August 8, 2017
Approve the minutes of the August 8, 2017 Corrections Policy Committee meeting.

3. Approval for Changes to the Basic Parole & Probation Curriculum
Presented by Chris Enquist

4. Quarterly Review of DOC BCC
Presented by Robert Sigleer

5. Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0065 and Repeal of 259-008-0066 -- Combines the certification maintenance for P&P Officers employed part-time with the requirements for all other law enforcement officers
Presented by Jennifer Howald

6. Introduction to New Denial/Revocation/Suspension Standards
Presented by Linsay Hale


7. Administrative Closures -- Corrections/Parole & Probation
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8. Ware, John DPSST #30288 -- DOC EOCI; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9. Shield, Russell DPSST #42433 -- Coos County Sheriff's Office; Basic Corrections Certification and Application for Intermediate Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10. Nauman, Alexander DPSST #54373 -- DOC OSCI; Basic Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

11. Feist, Miranda DPSST #57004 -- DOC TRCI; Application for Training and Subsequent Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

12. Olsen, Theresa DPSST #33223 -- DOC OSP; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications and Instructor Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

13. Frost, Nicolas DPSST # 48377 -- DOC DRCI; Basic and Intermediate Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

14. Todd, Cheryl DPSST #51507 -- DOC SFFC; Basic Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

15. Hernandez Jeffrey DPSST #45724 -- DOC OSP; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications and Instructor Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

16. Cook, Christopher DPSST #53053 -- DOC SRCI; Basic Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

17. Joseph, Tracey DPSST #31239 -- DOC CRCI; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

18. Moore, Kenneth DPSST #57737 -- Curry County Sheriff's Office; Application for Training and Subsequent Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

19. Witty, Kyle DPSST #57693 -- DOC EOCI -- Application for Training and Subsequent Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds


20. Hyder, Brandan DPSST # 57869 -- Warm Springs Police Department; Application for Training and Subsequent Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

21. Gilham, Robert DPSST #57870 -- Warm Springs Police Department; Application for Training and Subsequent Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

22. Holguin, Michael DPSST # 51994 -- Josephine County Sheriff's Office; Application for Training and Subsequent Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

23. Department Update

24. Next Regularly Scheduled Meeting -- February 13, 2018 @ 1:30 p.m.


## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
DPSST Basic Telecommunications Curriculum Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/17/17 4:14 PM
For Immediate Release
October 17, 2017
Contact: Sara Stewart
503-378-2424


Notice of Regular Meeting
The Basic Telecommunications Curriculum Committee will hold a regular curriculum meeting at 10:00-15:30 on October 26, 2017. The meeting will be held in the conference room A234 at DPSST. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.


Agenda Items:

Welcome new members
Final revisions to content drafts
Mini Basic Facilitator Development
Instructor Suggestions
Instructional Materials Review & To Do




Administrative Announcement
This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by the Basic Telecommunications Curriculum Committee unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
Glass Ionomer Rules Advisory Committee to meet October 19
Oregon Health Authority - 10/17/17 4:06 PM
October 17, 2017

What: A public meeting of the Glass Ionomer Rules Advisory Committee (RAC)

Agenda: Approve meeting minutes; review draft amended rule language (version 2); review statement of need and fiscal impact form; discuss next steps

When: Thursday, Oct. 19, 9-11 a.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1A, Portland. Conference line: 888-636-3807, participant code 793800.

Who: The Glass Ionomer Rules Advisory Committee includes broad representation of these key stakeholder categories: coordinated care organizations (CCOs), dental care organization (DCOs), local school dental sealant programs, and dental sealant materials and clinical experts. More information can be found on the committee's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/sealantcert.

Program contact: Amy Umphlett, 971-673-1564,amy.m.umphlett@state.or.us

# # #
21st Century program receives $1.8 million grant to expand elementary afterschool programs (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 10/17/17 2:57 PM
2017-10/1288/108839/Brent_Cummings.jpg
2017-10/1288/108839/Brent_Cummings.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/1288/108839/thumb_Brent_Cummings.jpg
WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla Public Schools received a $1.8 million federal five-year grant to provide 21st Century Community Learning Center afterschool programs at Edison, Green Park and Sharpstein elementary schools. This new funding allows 300 additional students, 100 per elementary school, to participate in these high quality programs focused on improved student academic performance. The primary objective of the new grant is to raise English Language Arts and math skills. The grant also provides additional resources to develop social-emotional support, reduce discipline referrals through improved student behaviors and curb chronic absenteeism.

"With adoption of the new Strategic Plan, our afterschool program sites are poised to provide high quality instruction through the aligned and coherent systems established by our district," said 21st CCLC Director Brent Cummings. "Afterschool implementation of our newly adopted iReady curriculum and assessment, particularly at the younger grades, will provide the essential supplementary support our attendees need."

Walla Walla Public Schools now houses eight federal afterschool program sites, which includes the existing Blue Ridge, Garrison, Pioneer, Lincoln, and Wa-Hi programs. Annually, WWPS serves 800 total students through 21st CCLC afterschool programs. Cumming says integral to the success of the new grant are the four community partners: Community Resilience Initiative, Friends of Children of Walla Walla, Commitment to Community, and SOS Health Services.

"Each partner is a respected community leader and is a valuable asset to our students' academic success," Cummings said. "Community Resilience Initiative will help us build capacity and evaluate outcomes on a wider scale. Friends will connect us with an engaged and compassionate mentorship base. Commitment to Community will help us strengthen bonds with our school's families and local neighborhoods. SOS Health Services will provide essential after-hours wellness resources, including the free walk-in clinic, to support our students and their families."

21st Century Program Background:

21st CCLC programs support the creation of community learning centers that provide academic enrichment opportunities during non-school hours for children, particularly students who attend high-poverty and low-performing schools. These programs help students meet state and local standards in core academic subjects, such as reading and math; offer students a broad array of enrichment activities that can complement their regular academic programs; and provide literacy and other educational services to the families of participating children.

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Attached Media Files: 2017-10/1288/108839/Brent_Cummings.jpg
Oregon Home Care Commission meets Thursday, November 2, 10 a.m. in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/17/17 2:45 PM
The Oregon Home Care Commission (OHCC) meets Thursday, November 2,
10 a.m., 676 Church Street NE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.
The agenda includes: public testimony; Executive Director's report; OHCC Budget Update; Governor's Commission on Senior Services; Oregon Disabilities Commission; Oregon Association of Area Agencies on Aging and Disabilities, Oregon Self-Advocacy Coalition, Aging and People with Disabilities, Community Advisory Councils and Coordinated Care Organizations; and a Quarterly Homecare Worker Benefits Trusts update.

There will be a working lunch during question and answer staff reports, including: quarterly Workers' Compensation, quarterly Registry and quarterly STEPS QBR Referral, bi-monthly Developmental Disabilities/Mental Health Committee and monthly OHP OmbudsAdvisory Council, Traditional Health Worker Commission and training/Registry updates.

A Worker's Classification -- Workforce Development update will be followed by a quarterly Aging and People with Disabilities update. The full agenda is attached.

For those who are unable to attend in person there is a call-in number: 1-888-278-0296; then dial the access code: 7999724 #. The commission meets on the first Thursday of every month. Visitors are welcome to these meetings. Persons needing an accommodation due to a disability should contact Joanna DeMeyer at 503-378-4984; joanna.m.demeyer@state.or.us.

About the Oregon Home Care Commission (OHCC)
The OHCC ensures high quality homecare services for seniors and people with physical, intellectual/developmental and mental health disabilities. The Commission defines qualifications, manages a statewide registry and trains homecare workers (HCWs) and personal support workers (PSWs). The commission serves as the employer of record for purposes of collective bargaining for HCWs and PSWs receiving service payments from public funds.

Learn more about OHCC at www.oregon.gov/dhs/seniors-disabilities/hc and
"Like" us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/OregonHomeCareCommission.

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Attached Media Files: 2017-10/973/108838/Home_Care_Commission_Agenda_November_2_2017.pdf
FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Nigerian 419 Scams
FBI - Oregon - 10/17/17 10:00 AM
October Marks National Cyber Security Awareness Month. For more information about emerging cyber threats, go to https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/national-cyber-security-awareness-month-2017

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Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against Nigerian 419 scams.

In 2016, the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center received almost 400 reports of 419 scams. The total losses reported by victims exceeded $1 million.

So what are Nigerian 419 scams? The number 419 refers to a section in Nigerian law concerning con artistry and fraud that deals specifically with people requesting assistance with transferring money. This scam has been around for a long time, but now more often than not, the scammer is contacting victims electronically.

What does this look like? An individual may contact you, often through e-mail, explaining that he needs help transferring a large amount of money. He tells you that political turmoil or a recent natural disaster in his country has affected his ability to transfer the money on his own. If you help him, he will allow you to keep some of the funds for yourself.

The scammer asks you to give him your financial information -- including your bank account number -- so he can complete the transfer. This allows him to access and steal from your accounts.

In another version of this scam, the fraudster may require that you to pay a fee in order to facilitate the transfer. Once you pay the fraudster, and he sees that you're willing to give him money, he continues to invent extra costs that he needs you to cover. As long as you keep paying, he keeps coming up with more expenses.

Regardless of which method the fraudsters use, these victims never see the promised jackpot.

So, how can you protect yourself?
Don't give anyone your bank account number or other financial information that could allow him to access your accounts.
Don't send money to strangers, unsolicited contacts or people you don't know face-to-face.
Don't transfer money on behalf of other people.
Don't trust anything that seems like an easy way to make a lot of money. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

If you have been victimized by this scam or any other online scam, report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.


Attached Media Files: TT - Nigerian Scams - ENGLISH Audio , TT - Nigerian Scams - SPANISH Audio , TT - Nigerian Scams - SPANISH Written , TT - Nigerian Scams - RUSSIAN Audio , TT - Nigerian Scams - RUSSIAN Written
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon September 2017 News Release
Oregon Employment Dept. - 10/17/17 10:00 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 17, 2017 CONTACT INFORMATION:
Nick Beleiciks, State Employment Economist
(503) 947-1267 Video and Audio available at 10:00 AM
David Cooke, Economist (503) 947-1272


Oregon's Employment Declines for the Second Consecutive Month in September

In September, Oregon's nonfarm payroll employment dropped by 3,800 jobs, following a revised loss of 7,000 in August. These job losses followed rapid gains during February through July, when a total of 42,600 jobs were added in just six months.

Recent forest fires did not have a noticeable impact on the September jobs report. Although many individuals and businesses were impacted in September by forest fires that raged in many locations within Oregon, the industry employment totals did not appear to be impacted significantly. A job is counted in this report when a worker is employed for any part of the business's pay period that includes the 12th of the month. Workers able to return to work during the September pay period are counted in the jobs report.

In September, four industries cut more than 1,000 jobs, while two added more than 1,000. Leisure and hospitality (-3,700 jobs) cut the most as this industry returned to the long-term trend line after a spike upward in June and July. With vacancy surveys indicating that many firms are having trouble attracting workers, part of the weakness in hiring is likely due to the tight labor market.

Professional and business services (-3,100 jobs) cut back at a time of year when a flat trend is typical for the industry. The industry appears to have stalled from its upward trajectory over the past eight years. Each of its published component industries cut jobs since September 2016: employment services (-1,400 jobs), business support services (-400), and services to buildings and dwellings ( 1,500). The two other industries that cut substantially in September were private educational services ( 1,400 jobs) and other services (-1,200).

All was not lost in September, as construction added 2,900 jobs and government added 1,400.

The September jobs report indicates that Oregon's over-the-year job growth, while moderate, has slowed. Between September 2016 and September 2017, payroll employment expanded by 37,400 jobs, or 2.0 percent. This is a reduction from the 3.1 percent job-growth rate seen through July. In the past 12 months, several industries continued to add jobs at a rapid clip, such as construction (+11,600 jobs, or 12.7%); health care and social assistance (+8,500 jobs, or 3.7%); and manufacturing (+5,700 jobs, or 3.0%). However, many of Oregon's industries haven't experienced the same rapid growth over the past 12 months, including government; professional and business services; wholesale trade; information; other services; and logging.

Oregon's unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 4.2 percent in September from 4.1 percent in August. Oregon's rate was significantly below its year-ago rate of 4.9 percent in September 2016. The U.S. unemployment rate was 4.2 percent in September 2017.

These preliminary estimates of jobs and other labor force data are produced in cooperation with the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, are based largely on a survey of businesses and a survey of households, and are subject to later revision.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the September county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, October 24th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for October on Tuesday, November 14th.??NLG



Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted except for the detailed industries within professional and business services.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month's release incorporates the January, February and March 2017 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.



The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon Centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program -- auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.


Attached Media Files: Employment In Oregon September 2017
BLM announces three selections for National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 10/17/17 9:20 AM
Oregon Wild Horses
Oregon Wild Horses
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/5514/108821/thumb_Feb_20_2010_Burns_Horse_Adoption_22.jpg
WASHINGTON -- The Bureau of Land Management announced today that the Secretaries of Interior and Agriculture have made selections for the three open positions on its nine-member National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board. Mr. Fred T. Woehl, Jr. of Harrison, Arkansas, has been reappointed for the category of public interest (equine behavior); Dr. Sue M. McDonnell of West Chester, Pennsylvania, has been reappointed for the category of wild horse and burro research; and Mr. James French of Winnemucca, Nevada, has been newly appointed for the category of natural resources management. Each individual will serve a three-year term on the Advisory Board.

The nine-member National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board advises the BLM, an agency of the Interior Department, and the U.S. Forest Service, part of the Agriculture Department, on the management and protection of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands and national forests administered by those agencies, as mandated by the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. Members of the board, who represent various categories of interests, must have a demonstrated ability to analyze information, evaluate programs, identify problems, work collaboratively, and develop corrective actions. More information about the advisory board can be found here.

Mr. Woehl has been involved in the horse community for over 43 years as a trainer, natural horsemanship clinician and educator. He has been involved with the Equine Science Department at the University of Arkansas and taught Equine Science at North Arkansas College. He has served as a volunteer for the BLM's Wild Horse and Burro Program for ten years, conducting demonstrations of wild horse versatility and assisting with adoptions. Additionally, Mr. Woehl worked as a senior agricultural adviser for the U.S. State Department from October 2008 to November 2009 in Iraq, where he was responsible for the development and implementation of agricultural programs and policy for the Ninewa Province. From November 2009 to March, 2011, he worked in the Kingdom of Jordan, for the Department of Interior's International Technical Assistance Program, where he developed policies for horse use and trained the local Bedouin tribesmen in humane methods of training and in the use of horses at the Archeological Park of Petra. Mr. Woehl currently has four BLM mustangs that are used for demonstrations in Branson, Missouri, and good-will visits at nursing homes, schools and churches.

Dr. McDonnell is a Clinical Associate and Adjunct Professor of Reproduction and Behavior at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. Also, as a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist, she consults privately on equine behavior and welfare. Dr. McDonnell, who holds a Ph.D. from the University of Delaware, co-edited the current leading academic book on horse behavior, titled "The Domestic Horse: The Evolution, Development and Management of its Behavior," published by Cambridge University Press.

Mr. French has spent more than 40 years involved in the management of wildlife on public lands in north-central Nevada. Over the course of his career, including 32 years as a biologist with the Nevada Department of Wildlife, he developed a unique understanding of wild horse and burro issues, and has worked with diverse groups to develop land management plans on county, state and federally-managed public lands. Since 2011, he has served on the Humboldt County Commission, the Nevada Association of Counties (also known as NACO) Board of Directors, the National NACO Western Interstate Region Board of Directors, NACO Public Lands and Natural Resources Steering Committees (both state and national), the Humboldt River Water Authority Board of Directors, and the Nevada State Land Use Planning Council. He has contributed to the development of public lands policy, resource management plans and herd management plans for more than three decades. Mr. French has worked collaboratively with county commissions in 16 counties, as well as the BLM, U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs and government in six states.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any federal agency. This land is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.


Attached Media Files: Oregon Wild Horses
County advisory group to state forestry meets Oct. 20
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/17/17 9:00 AM
Release date: Oct. 16, 2017

Contact:
Liz Dent, State Forests Division Chief, Salem, 503-945-7351



Salem, ORE - The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee will meet Friday, Oct. 20 from 9:30 a.m. to noon at the Oregon Department of Forestry Salem headquarters, Tillamook Room, Building C, 2600 State St. Items on the committee's agenda include comments from State Forester Peter Daugherty and updates from the ODF State Forests Division staff on the following:
Business Improvements
State Forests Division performance measures reporting
Habitat Conservation Plan
Forest Management Plan project

The meeting agenda is available on the department's web site at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/FTLAC.aspx.

The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee is comprised of seven county commissioners representing 15 Oregon counties where state forestlands are located. The FTLAC is a statutorily established committee that advises the Board of Forestry on matters related to forestland managed by ODF.

Members of the public may attend the meeting and an opportunity for public comment is scheduled. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-945-7200.

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Mon. 10/16/17
Division of Financial Regulation seeking comment on cost-sharing reduction rate increases -- deadline is Oct. 17 at 5 p.m.
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/16/17 3:19 PM
Salem - The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation is seeking public comment on cost-sharing reduction rate increases for silver metal tier individual health insurance premiums for 2018 plans.

The comment period starts Monday, Oct. 16. Due to the limited time frame to file revised rates, the deadline for comment is Tuesday, Oct. 17 at 5 p.m. To comment in writing, email Ethan Baldwin via email at Ethan.C.Baldwin@oregon.gov.

The reason for the public comment period is on Oct. 12, the Trump administration issued an announcement about immediately stopping cost-sharing reduction payments to health insurance companies. The Division of Financial Regulation is committed to the stability of Oregon's health insurance market and ensuring access to statewide comprehensive health coverage.

The division has determined that in order to ensure carriers can continue to offer coverage in Oregon, it must offer health insurance companies offering plans on HealthCare.gov the opportunity to increase their already approved silver metal tier 2018 plan rates by 7.1 percent. The deadline for insurance companies and the state to file new rates on HealthCare.gov is 12 p.m. on Oct. 17.

Non-silver metal tier plan rates (e.g., bronze and gold) will remain unaffected.

This increase will affect plans both on and off HealthCare.gov, and will compensate for the $49 million worth of cost-sharing reduction payments that the federal government will no longer be making to Oregon insurance companies in 2018.

Visit http://dfr.oregon.gov/news/Pages/20171013-trump-payment-reduction.aspx for more details about the decision to increase rates and a sample rate table of the revised rates.

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The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.dfr.oregon.gov.
OPRD seeks to fill position on grant committee that advises on statewide trails
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/16/17 2:09 PM
The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is seeking a representative of the hiking community for a vacant volunteer position on the Recreation Trails Program (RTP) Advisory Committee that evaluates grants for statewide trails projects.

The competitive grant program is funded by the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration and administered by OPRD. Grants are awarded to non-profits and governments for trail projects, including building new trails, improving existing trails and installing trail signs.

"Reviewing these grant applications is an important step in the process of improving and expanding Oregon's trail system," said OPRD grant coordinator Jodi Bellefeuille. "Grant committee members get to have a direct say in what trail projects are funded and provide feedback to land managers about their proposals."

The ten member committee evaluates and ranks requests for grant funding. Ideal candidates can live anywhere in Oregon and will be avid hikers with experience in one or more of the following areas: recreation planning, trail design, project management, grant management and budget review.

The committee meets once or twice a year at locations throughout the state. In 2017, meetings were held in Salem in May and September. Dates for 2018 have not been finalized. Time commitment varies and includes reviewing and evaluating 40-80 grant applications each annual funding cycle.

Those interested in serving must submit an OPRD Grant Advisory Committee Appointment Interest Form by Friday, Nov. 17. For more information or to obtain an interest form, visit http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/Pages/RTP-Committee.aspx, or contact Jodi Bellefeuille at jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov or 503-986-0716.
Committee to review Oregon Heritage Grant applications
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/16/17 1:19 PM
A committee will meet to score and rank applications for the Oregon Heritage Grant program. The recommendations from the committees will be forwarded to the Oregon Heritage Commission for final review and approval on November 6 via conference call. The grant committee meeting will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street, NE, and can also be accessed by phone. The committee will meet October 30, 9:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m. in room 124A. Call in information is 1?888?
278?0296, access Code: 4653554.

For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov .
Community Bank Week honored in Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/16/17 11:30 AM
(Salem) -- Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has proclaimed Oct. 16-20, 2017, as Community Bank Week, honoring local banks for the significant economic and civic contributions they make in communities across the state.

Oregon banks, most of which are chartered by the Department of Consumer and Business Services, take a relationship-based approach to doing business and are actively involved in the communities they serve. They play an essential part of the state's economy, financing Main Street businesses, providing a full range of banking services, and creating jobs.

In some communities, the banks are the largest employer or the only provider of banking services.

"Oregon communities, especially small businesses, depend on their local banks," said Jean Straight, acting DCBS director. "Not only do these local bankers lend to Oregon families and farms to help communities flourish, but they also provide critical information and education to their customers about a variety of financial matters."

Community banks reported loans to Oregon small businesses topping $5.9 billion in a single year, according to a recent survey by the Oregon Bankers Association. The survey also showed community banks in the state gave to their communities, pitching in $4.9 million to nonprofits and community organizations. Meanwhile, their employees logged more than 64,000 volunteer hours.

Members of Community Banks of Oregon (CBO) and community banks throughout the state are celebrating Community Bank Week in Oregon. Banks will host consumers, students, small businesses, and local elected officials to showcase the positive effect banks have on the people they serve.

To learn more about the Oregon banks recognized during Community Bank Week, go to http://www.oregonbankers.com/community-bank-week.html.

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The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest consumer protection and business regulatory agency. The department's Division of Financial Regulation oversees the financial and insurance industries in Oregon. For more information, visit http://www.oregon.gov/dcbs/Pages/index.aspx and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.
Services for seniors will continue
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/16/17 8:46 AM
On August 23, 2017 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board of Directors determined "that the Mid-Columbia Council of Governments cease providing services under all programs and contracts." "Further MCOGS shall continue to provide services until such time that appropriate process and transitions may be undertaken by the parties in the best interest of the public, programs, employees and the organization as a whole."

The Department of Human Services/Aging and People with Disabilities has initiated the public process of designating another entity to function as the Area Agency on Aging and deliver services, as outlined in the Older Americans Act, Oregon Revised Statute Chapter 410 and the Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 411, Division 2.

In late October and early November Aging and People with Disabilities will be holding public meetings in Hood River, Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam and Wheeler counties share information on the process and seek public input. Details on these meetings will be shared as soon as they are available.
Sat. 10/14/17
Oregon sends five more task forces to Ca (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 10/14/17 10:18 AM
Strike team crews prepare to leave for California
Strike team crews prepare to leave for California
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/1062/108769/thumb_626[1].jpeg
California fire officials sent an additional request for five strike teams from Oregon to assist with fires burning near Chino in southerrn California.

In response, the OSFM Agency Operations Center activated strike team crews from Linn/Benton counties, Umatilla/Union counties, Clackamas County, and Klamath/Douglas counties who are now on their way.

The OSFM is extremely grateful to Oregon's fire chiefs and their agencies for again stepping up to the plate to help our neighbors to the south as they continue to struggle with an unprecedented amount of fires on their landscape.


Attached Media Files: Strike team crews prepare to leave for California , Strike team crews prepare to leave for California , Strike team crews preparing to leave for California
Fri. 10/13/17
State announcement regarding Trump administration discontinuation of cost-sharing reduction payments
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/13/17 2:22 PM
Salem -- On Oct. 12, the Trump administration issued an announcement about stopping cost-sharing reduction payments to health insurance companies immediately. The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) is committed to the stability of Oregon's health insurance market and ensuring access to statewide comprehensive health coverage. After analyzing the announcement and its implications, DCBS has determined that there will be no change for 2017 health plans and is implementing a plan to ensure stability beyond this year.

"Oregonians can be assured that their 2017 plan rates and benefits will not change today or through the end of the year," said Jean Straight, acting DCBS director. "Premiums will not change, premium assistance through HealthCare.gov will not change, and working families in Oregon who are enrolled in cost-sharing reduction plans can continue to access this important type of assistance."

In order to ensure carriers can continue to offer coverage in Oregon, DCBS is ordering health insurance companies offering plans on HealthCare.gov to increase their already approved silver metal tier 2018 plan rates by 7.1 percent.

Non-silver metal tier plan rates (e.g., bronze and gold) will remain unaffected.

This increase will affect plans both on and off HealthCare.gov, and will compensate for the $49 million worth of cost-sharing reduction payments that the federal government will no longer be making to Oregon insurance companies in 2018.

"These rate increases are necessary to ensure the stability of the health insurance market," said Acting Director Straight. "Oregonians who receive financial assistance through the Marketplace will find that premium assistance will also increase, shielding them from most of the increase."

Oregonians who do not qualify for premium assistance through HealthCare.gov are encouraged to work with an agent to shop around and consider a non-silver level plan that might work for their situation.

Open enrollment for 2018 plans begins Nov. 1 and runs through Dec. 15, 2017. Oregonians are encouraged to work with an agent or community partner to find the best plan for their situation. Due to these additional rate increases on silver metal tier plans, it is especially important to apply for financial assistance through HealthCare.gov.

What are cost-sharing reduction (CSR) plans?
In addition to providing help paying for premiums, the Affordable Care Act requires Marketplace insurers to offer cost-sharing reduction plans to middle-income consumers (under 250 percent of the federal poverty level). These are silver-level plans with lower maximum out-of-pocket limits, deductibles, co-pays, and co-insurance, making access to health care services more affordable. About 50,000 Oregonians were enrolled in cost-sharing reduction plans.

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The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
Richland Town Hall Budget Meeting on Thursday, Oct 19
City of Richland - 10/13/17 1:39 PM
The City of Richland will hold a Town Hall Budget Meeting on Thursday, October 19 at 6:30 p.m. in the Riverview Room of the Richland Community Center.
Residents will receive information regarding the budget process, priority projects for the coming year, and ways to stay informed.
The one-hour program will be moderated by Richland resident, Jim Hall. City Manager, Cindy Reents, will present the 2018 proposed budget. Department Directors will also be on-hand to answer questions.
Richland Town Hall will air live on the City's Facebook Page and be recorded for Richland's City View Channel 192. The Richland Community Center is located at 500 Amon Park Drive.
Update on Oregon fire agencies assisting with California wildfires (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 10/13/17 1:16 PM
Oregon's Washington County Strike Team helping to battle the California wildfires
Oregon's Washington County Strike Team helping to battle the California wildfires
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/1062/108747/thumb_TVF_and_R_Night_Two_FFs.jpg
All 10 strike teams the OSFM has sent south to assist with the wildfires in California are actively engaged on a 24-hour work cycle protecting homes and other structures.

Five strike teams from Lane County (2), Linn/Benton counties, Clatsop/Columbia counties, and Yamhill County have been assigned to the Central LNU Complex covering Sonoma, Lake, and Napa counties.

Five strike teams from Washington County, Multnomah County, Marion County, Jackson/Josephine counties, and Klamath/Deschutes counties are assigned to the Southern LNU complex covering Napa, Sonoma, and Solano counties.

Oregon fire agency reps: OSFM State Fire Marshal Jim Walker (Central LNU Complex) and OSFM Red Team Incident Commander Ian Yocum (Southern LNU Complex) report that Oregon resources are preforming well and morale is high.

California is continuing to reach out to states to bring in additional resources. In addition to Oregon, resources have come from Washington, Nevada, Idaho, Utah, and Arizona.

California Fire Chief Kim Zagaris had high complements for Oregon resources stating that, "The ability of Oregon to mobilize and deploy their strike teams so quickly and efficiently has allowed our firefighters to get much needed rest," said Zagaris. "I'm impressed by the high caliber of the Oregon teams on the front lines doing tremendous structural protection work to protect the people and property of California. Everyone affected is extremely grateful for the help from Oregon."

California fire officials continue to expect dry windy conditions throughout the weekend which will continue to challenge firefighters and residents.

California made the request for assistance through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact a national state-to-state mutual aid system. The EMAC request is sent directly to Oregon Emergency Management which then contacts and coordinates with the appropriate Oregon agency to fulfill the requests; in this case the OSFM.

Follow the OSFM on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OregonStateFireMarshal/ and Twitter: @OSFM


Attached Media Files: Oregon's Washington County Strike Team helping to battle the California wildfires , Oregon's Washington County Strike Team helping to battle the California wildfires
Kicker details confirmed
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 10/13/17 12:02 PM
SALEM, Oregon--A more than $463 million tax surplus was confirmed by the Office of Economic Analysis (OEA) earlier this month, triggering a tax surplus credit, or "kicker," for the 2016 tax year.

The surplus will be returned to taxpayers through a credit on their 2017 state personal income tax returns filed in 2018. There won't be any kicker checks issued as there were in the past.

To calculate the amount of your credit, multiply your 2016 tax liability before any credits--line 24 on the 2016 Form OR-40--by 6.3 percent. This percentage is determined and certified by OEA. Taxpayers who claimed a credit for tax paid to another state subtract the credit amount from their liability before calculating the credit.

You're eligible to claim the kicker if you filed a 2016 tax return and had tax due before credits. Even if you don't have a filing obligation for 2017, you still have to file a 2017 tax return to claim your credit. There will be detailed information on how to claim your credit in the 2017 Oregon personal income tax return instructions: Form OR-40 for full-year Oregon residents, Form OR-40-P for part-year residents, and Form OR-40-N for nonresidents. Composite and fiduciary-income tax return filers are also eligible.

Keep in mind that the state may use all or part of your kicker to pay any state debt you owe, such as tax due for other years, child support, court fines, or school loans.

A What's My Kicker? calculator will be active on Revenue's website for personal income tax filers when filing season opens in January. To calculate your kicker, you'll enter your name, Social Security number, and filing status for 2016 and 2017.

You can visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get forms, check the status of your refund, or make payments. You can call (503) 378-4988 or (800) 356-4222 (toll-free) or email questions.dor@oregon.gov for additional assistance. For TTY for hearing or speech impaired, call (800) 886-7204.

- 30 -
Addiction and the Brain -- Understanding this National Epidemic at a Local Level
City of Richland - 10/13/17 11:47 AM
A presentation to inform and educate the public about the health crises of addiction currently affecting our nation is Thursday, October 19, at 7:00 p.m. in the Richland Public Library's Gallery Room.

The presenter, Dr. Michele S. Gerber, a retired Hanford Site Historian turned brain researcher on drug addiction, has been working with the Richland Police Department and the Richland Fire Department to gather input for her study. Representatives from both Fire and Police will also be on-hand to provide a local perspective on the problem.

This lecture will include current levels of the problem, new information about the brains science involved in addiction, dynamics and issues of families with an addicted loved one, and grassroots efforts to deal with addicts and combat addiction. The talk will conclude with suggestions what friends and family members can do to help address this problem.

Dr. Gerber is interested in research leading to effective addiction treatments, advocacy, education, prevention, parity in treatment accessibility and publicity regarding the family disease of addiction.
AWSL Conference Schedule for This Weekend (Starting Today)
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 10/13/17 10:45 AM
Attached is the schedule for the AWSL student conference in Yakima this weekend, hosted by Eisenhower and Davis High Schools.
The conference, especially the General Sessions, is open to the media (please have your credentials and check in at the registration table).

Two points of interest:
1) We have invited Elizabeth McCormick to address the audience....her bio below:

Our speaker is currently #5 on the list of
Leadership experts to follow on Twitter, she is
the host of a new TV show about Veterans
which starts filming this Winter and is a best
selling author with more than 16 published
books. In 2011, Elizabeth was awarded the
Congressional Veteran Commendation.
As a decorated Black Hawk Pilot- one of the first
100 women- she flew command and control, air
assault, rappelling, and top-secret intelligence
missions, and also transported high-level
government VIPs including the Secretary of
Defense.

2) Students have collected thousands of items to support their chosen organization for the Conference: Teytum's Gifts http://www.teytumsgifts.com/ We invite you to come and see the loads and loads of items that have been collected to support children entering foster care.

Should you have questions, you will need to report to the event, check-in at the registration table and ask for conference leader. Please see the attachment for the schedule. School is not in session today and YSD's media office is closed.


Attached Media Files: 2017-10/3536/108740/AWSL_FINAL_Schedule_2017.pdf
Walla Walla School District Board of Directors Regular Business Meeting: October 17, 2017
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 10/13/17 10:26 AM
Walla Walla School District Board of Directors Regular Business Meeting: October 17, 2017

Supporting documents are available via the following link: https://v3.boardbook.org/Public/PublicHome.aspx?ak=1001835