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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Tue. Sep. 17 - 1:47 pm
Tue. 09/17/19
Pacific Power renewable energy customers are national leaders again
Pacific Power - 09/17/19 1:39 PM

Contact:

Tom Gauntt

503-813-7291

Tom.Gauntt@pacificorp.com

 


Pacific Power renewable energy customers are national leaders again
Blue Sky is a top 5 utility green power program for 17th straight year

 

PORTLAND, Ore.—Pacific Power’s Blue Sky customers are among the nation’s most devoted promoters of renewable energy as the program has once again received national recognition for its leadership and impact. For the 17th year, the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory ranked Blue Sky—which includes Pacific Power and Rocky Mountain Power customers—in the top five utility green power programs in the entire country.

 

For 2019, Blue Sky ranks second for total number of participating customers and third for total renewable energy sales through a voluntary program. For full report go to: nrel.gov/analysis/green-power.html.

 

The Blue Sky program provides a convenient way for Pacific Power customers to support renewable energy. More than 73,700 customers in Oregon, Washington and California participate in the program, which has generated more than 8 million megawatt-hours of renewable energy from wind, solar, biomass, and geothermal projects, reducing their emissions footprint by nearly 6 million tons of CO2 through our six states. Pacific Power Blue Sky customers have also supported more than 120 community-based renewable energy projects.

 

 “Our Blue Sky customers are living examples of a virtuous cycle” said Berit Kling, program manager. “Customers enthusiastically support the continued growth of renewable energy and by doing so help fund green projects in local communities. But it all starts with customers and their own green power goals. We are happy to help them achieve those goals through Blue Sky, which combines all those personal aspirations and makes a big difference both locally and globally.”

 

Local renewable projects include a micro-hydro project at Wallowa Lake State Park, a large solar array at a Portland community center and solar panels at the Glide Fire Dept. in Douglas County.

 

The Blue Sky program provides an easy and convenient way for Pacific Power customers to support renewable energy in the region beyond the company’s cost-effective renewable resource investments to serve all customers. Blue Sky is Green-e Energy certified by the non-profit Center for Resource Solutions and customers can participate in the program for as little as $1.95 each month. For more information or to sign up, visit pacificpower.net/bluesky or call toll free at 800-769-3717.


DSL director approves extension of Jordan Cove permit approval
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 09/17/19 12:55 PM

NEWS RELEASE – for immediate release

Media Contact:

Ken Armstrong, Communications Manager, 503-881-2623, mstrong@state.or.us">ken.armstrong@state.or.us

Sept. 17, 2019

DSL extends Jordan Cove Removal-Fill permit decision date after request from applicant

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon Department of State Lands Director Vicki Walker last week approved extending the deadline for the Removal-Fill permit decision on the Jordan Cove LNG application to Jan. 31, 2020, based on a Sept. 13 letter from the applicant requesting the extension. The agency had been scheduled to decide on the permit on Sept. 20, 2019.

Jordan Cove LNG also agreed to submit by Oct. 20 a second set of responses to questions surrounding substantive and technical issues that are not yet resolved. On Sept. 4, DSL received and is reviewing the applicant’s first set of responses. This request represents the second extension given by DSL on this application (File 60697-RF), the first being given on March 5.

For more information on the Jordan Cove Energy Project, visit the DSL Jordan Cove web site.

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The agency administers diverse natural and fiscal resources, many of which generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. DSL also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


Bus Crash in Manzanita loaded with Army National Guard Members (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/17/19 10:06 AM
2019-09/1002/127675/rilea.jpg
2019-09/1002/127675/rilea.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127675/thumb_rilea.jpg

 On September 16, 2019 at approximately 7:00 AM, Oregon State Police (OSP) and emergency personnel responded to a non-injury bus crash on US Hwy 101 in Manzanita. The bus was occupied by 46 Army National Guard members from the HHC 1-186 IN from Medford. The Tillamook County District Attorney’s Office will review the case for charges of Driving under the Influence and 46 counts of Reckless Endangering against the driver.

The preliminary investigation revealed the bus had departed from Camp Rilea and was en route to Portland. The driver, Kenneth Alexander, age 44, from Vancouver, Washington missed the turn onto US Hwy 26 outside of Seaside. The driver assured the passengers he knew the route to Portland and continued southbound on US Hwy 101. The passengers grew concerned over the driver using his cell phone and showing signs of impairment and at the same time the driver lost control of the bus and crashed into the sidewalk.

The driver was transported to local hospital for evaluation. No other injuries were reported. OSP was assisted by Manzanita Police Department, and the Tillamook County District Attorney’s Office. The City of Manzanita opened City Hall to the members of the National Guard until another bus arrived.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127675/rilea.jpg , 2019-09/1002/127675/rilea.2.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon August 2019 News Release
Oregon Employment Department - 09/17/19 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Remains at 4.0 Percent in August  

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.0 percent in August, the same as in June and July. The U.S. unemployment rate was 3.7 percent during each of the most recent three months of June, July, and August.

Oregon’s unemployment rate has been between 4.0 percent and 4.4 percent for 34 consecutive months dating back to November 2016. This sustained stretch of low unemployment is unprecedented in comparable records dating back to 1976. In the 40 years prior to 2016, Oregon’s unemployment rate was never below 4.7 percent.

In August, Oregon’s total nonfarm payroll employment added 900 jobs, following a gain of 2,400 jobs in July. Monthly gains for August were strongest in leisure and hospitality (+1,600 jobs) and professional and business services (+1,100). These gains were offset by job losses in several industries: wholesale trade (-900 jobs); other services (-900); retail trade (-700); and health care and social assistance (-600).

Recent employment growth has slowed from the rapid expansion over the prior several years. In the first eight months of 2019, total nonfarm employment gains averaged 1,000 jobs per month. This was a marked slowdown from the average gain of 3,000 jobs per month in 2018. So far in 2019, several industries have cut jobs, with information down the most in percentage terms (-2,000 jobs, or -5.7%). Several other major industries shed jobs in that time: finance and insurance ( 1,200 jobs, or  2.1%); leisure and hospitality (-2,600 jobs, or -1.2%); and retail trade (-2,200 jobs, or  1.0%). These losses were offset by job growth over the past eight months in education and health services (6,400 jobs, or 2.2%); professional and business services (4,200 jobs, or 1.7%); and manufacturing (3,100 jobs, or 1.6%).

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the August county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, September 24th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for September on Tuesday, October 15th.

Notes: 
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources. 

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the January, February and March 2019 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/930/127674/employment_in_Oregon_--_August_2019_--_press_release.pdf

Consider Youth Preparedness this Third Week of National Preparedness Month
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/17/19 9:22 AM

September is National Preparedness Month. In this third week (Sept. 16-22), FEMA focuses on youth preparedness. In partnership with OEM, FEMA Region X has ideas and tips on how to prepare youth, families, and educators for when a disaster occurs in Oregon.

What:   Information from FEMA Region X on different ways youth can be prepared for disasters

Why:    To increase family and community planning for disasters

Who:    Oregon Office of Emergency Management; FEMA Region X

When:   Sept. 16 -22, 2019

 On camera or in person interviews can be scheduled in Salem, OR. To schedule or for more information, contact David L. Yost at 425-487-4610 or by email at 10-newsdesk@femadhs.gov">fema-r10-newsdesk@femadhs.gov.

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Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Student Loan Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/17/19 9:00 AM
TT - Student Loan Scams - GRAPHIC - September 17, 2019
TT - Student Loan Scams - GRAPHIC - September 17, 2019
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3585/127645/thumb_Slide1.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against student loan scams.

Oregon and Washington college kids are packing up and heading back to class in the next couple weeks. That means more tuition, more books, and more bills. For many folks, the only way to get that education is to take out big loans, either through the federal government or private lenders.

When you get to the point where you have to start paying off those loans, our friends at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) have a warning about fraudsters who say they are only too happy to help.

The catch? You either have to pay an upfront fee or a monthly fee. They might claim that your fee will go towards your debt, but if you end up doing business with a scam artist, he will just take your money for himself. He will do nothing at all to help you with your loan – or give you minimal services that you could have gotten for free.

Here are some tips from the FTC on how avoid student loan repayment scams:

  • There is nothing that a company can offer that you cannot do for yourself for free.
  • Avoid any offer that promises quick loan forgiveness, especially if the person contacting you really has no idea as to the specifics of your debt situation. Many scammers will promise to get rid of your debt fast, but in reality, they can’t help you.
  • Never pay an upfront fee. In this situation, the FTC says it is illegal for companies to charge you a fee for a service in advance.
  • Neither a logo nor an official-looking website means that the company is real or trustworthy. Many scammers will use lookalike logos or even use a real Department of Education seal to make their companies look more legitimate.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

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Attached Media Files: TT - Student Loan Scams - AUDIO - September 17, 2019 , TT - Student Loan Scams - GRAPHIC - September 17, 2019

Mon. 09/16/19
Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 101 - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 09/16/19 4:24 PM

On Monday, September 16, 2019 at approximately 10:10 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a report of a two vehicle serious injury crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 241. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a blue Saab, operated by Rena Clemons (56) of Coos Bay, was northbound on Hwy 101 when she lost control of the vehicle and crossed the center line as she was negotiating a curve in the roadway.   She collided with a southbound green Ford Taurus operated by Michael Puschel (68) of Coos Bay.

Clemons sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Puschel and his passenger, Toni Puschel (67) of Coos Bay, were transported to Bay Area Hospital with serious injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Coos County Sheriff's Office, Millington Fire Department, Sumner Fire Department, Green Acres Fire Department, Bay Cities Ambulance, and ODOT


Committee for Family Forestlands meets Sept. 19 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/16/19 4:09 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Thursday, Sept. 19 from 10 a.m. to noon in Salem. The meeting will be in the Sun Pass Room of Building D on the campus of the Oregon Department of Forestry, 2600 State Street.  Among updates the committee will receive are ones about:

  • Private Forest Division
  • Wildfire
  • Process for committee recommendations and charter review
  • 2019-2020 work plan

The meeting is open to the public. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. You can find more information at  https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx

                                                                         # # #


Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet September 23 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 09/16/19 3:30 PM

September 16, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program Contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet September 23 in Portland

What: Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce

When: Monday, September 23, 2019, 1 p.m.-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building (PSOB), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland, Oregon

Agenda: Welcome, taskforce purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the taskforce, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary

For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui at 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.u, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Department of Revenue seeks input on Corporate Activity Tax rules
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 09/16/19 9:49 AM

The Oregon Department of Revenue (DOR) will host a series of meetings across the state over the next three weeks to seek input from business taxpayers and tax preparers about the administrative rules for Oregon’s new Corporate Activity Tax.

Traveling across Oregon, rule writers will sit down to hear the concerns, questions and suggestions of those affected by the rules.

The first of those meetings is planned for 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, September 17, at the Newport Recreation Center in Newport. The full meeting schedule includes stops in Corvallis, Beaverton, Medford, Grants Pass, Eugene, Bend, Redmond, Hermiston, Boardman, Portland and Salem.

“We believe business taxpayers and tax preparers can provide valuable input as we move through the rule-making process,” said Nia Ray, director of the Oregon Department of Revenue. “By touring the state, we hope more of the business community will be able to join the conversation.”

House Bill 3427 created Oregon’s Corporate Activity Tax and grants DOR the responsibility of writing rules to implement it.

The Corporate Activity Tax imposes a $250 tax on the first $1 million of gross receipts after subtractions and 0.57% tax on gross receipts greater than $1 million after subtractions, beginning January 1. It is expected to generate $1 billion a year to boost funding for public schools.

Throughout each meeting on the tour, department representatives will ensure two-way conversations and do their best to answer questions from attendees. They’ll also seek input from attendees to help guide the rule-making process.

Issues expected to be discussed at the series of meetings include:Who must register.

  • When and how businesses register.
  • Who must file and who must pay the tax.
  • Annual returns based on calendar year activity.
  • How commercial activity is defined.
  • Exemptions for charitable organizations.
  • Exclusions for groceries, subcontractors, wholesalers and others.
  • What counts toward the 35% subtraction.
  • How estimated payments will be calculated.
  • When estimated payments are due.

More information about the Corporate Activity Tax, including a list of frequently asked questions, is available on the Department of Revenue’s website.

Those who are unable to attend but want to provide input may email questions or comments to cat.help.dor@oregon.gov.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


DSL hosting public meeting on Elliott in Portland Sept. 24
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 09/16/19 8:31 AM

NEWS RELEASE – for immediate release

Media Contact:

Ken Armstrong, Communications Manager, 503-881-2623, mstrong@state.or.us">ken.armstrong@state.or.us

Sept. 16, 2019

DSL to host evening public meeting on the Elliott State Research Forest in Portland on Sept. 24

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Department of State Lands will host a public informational meeting in Portland on Tuesday, Sept. 24 for discussions surrounding a possible proposal by Oregon State University to establish a research forest on the Elliott. Oregon State University will join DSL  to share  information about the project.

In December 2018, the State Land Board directed the agency to work collaboratively with Oregon State University’s College of Forestry as it develops a plan for transforming the Elliott State Forest into a world-class research forest. The Land Board anticipates hearing the OSU proposal at its regular meeting in December (Salem).

Meeting date/location:

Tuesday, Sept. 24

5:30 – 7 p.m.

OSU Portland Center, classroom 2047

Located in the Meier & Frank Building (second floor)

555 SW Morrison St., Portland

(Parking nearby in Alder Street Parking Garage)

The meeting will kick off with brief presentations by DSL and by OSU on topics including the history of the Elliott, what a research forest might look like, and the status of the current  planning process. It will also include an opportunity for the public to speak with DSL and OSU representatives.

Click here for the DSL Elliott State Forest web page

Click here for the OSU Elliott State Research Forest web page

Join the Elliott State Research Forest email list! DSL will provide regular updates throughout the planning process to those who sign up for our ESRF mailing list. You must sign up for the ESRF email list separately from other DSL email lists

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


Sun. 09/15/19
ESD 123 Offers Mental Health First Aid Training in Tri Cities
ESD 123 - 09/15/19 8:51 PM

Local Area Part of National Initiative to Increase Mental Health Literacy

PASCO, WA - A young person you know could be experiencing a mental health challenge or crisis. You can help them!  On Wednesday, September 25, Educational Service District will offer Mental Health First Aid training. This eight-hour training course gives people the tools to identify when someone might be struggling with a mental health or substance use problem and connect them with appropriate support and resources when necessary. (See attached flyer.)

One in five Americans has a mental illness, but many are reluctant to seek help, or might not know where to turn for care. Unlike physical conditions, symptoms of mental health and substance use problems can be difficult to detect. For friends and family members, it can be hard to know when and how to step in. As a result, those in need of mental health services often do not get them until it is too late.

Just as CPR helps even those without clinical training assist an individual having a heart attack, Mental Health First Aid prepares participants to interact with a person experiencing a mental health crisis. Mental Health First Aid participants learn a 5-step action plan that guides them through the process of reaching out and offering appropriate support. 

“Through this program, we hope to take the fear and hesitation out of starting conversations about mental health and substance use problems,” says Linda Rosenberg President and CEO of the National Council for Behavioral Health, which helped bring Mental Health First Aid to the U.S. in 2008. “When more people are equipped with the tools they need to start a dialogue, more people can get the help they may need.”

Those interested in attending the training should register online at www.esd123.org/learn.  For more information, contact ESD Student Support Director, Dana Camarena, at 509.544.5762.

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To learn more about Mental Health First Aid USA, visit www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org. The National Council for Behavioral Health was instrumental in bringing Mental Health First Aid to the USA and more than 1 million individuals have been trained.




Attached Media Files: Youth Mental Health Training Flyer

Wrong way driver on Interstate 84 results in two fatalities - Gilliam County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/15/19 5:15 PM
2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074132.jpg
2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074132.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127625/thumb_20190915_074132.jpg

On Sunday, September 15, 2019 at approximately 5:44 A.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on I-84 near mile post 119.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Toyota Camry, operated by Josue Amando Lopez-Munoz (29) of Prosser, WA. was traveling westbound in the eastbound lanes.  He struck a eastbound PT Cruiser operated by Anita Dugger (33) of Salem, OR.

Lopez-Munoz sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Dugger sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

A 13 year old male in the PT Cruiser was transported by air ambulance to The Dalles and later by ground to OHSU in Portland.

OSP was assisted by North Gilliam Fire Department, North Gilliam Medics, Life flight, Morrow County Sheriff's Office, Gilliam County DA, Gilliam County ME, Benton County (WA) Sheriff's Office and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074132.jpg , 2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074124.jpg

Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 228 - Linn County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/15/19 1:00 PM
2019-09/1002/127623/20190915_043752.jpg
2019-09/1002/127623/20190915_043752.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127623/thumb_20190915_043752.jpg

On Sunday, September 15, 2019 at approximately 2:44 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 228 near mile post 4.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a 2011 Chevy Silverado, operated by Cody Sanders (33) of Shedd OR, was traveling westbound when he crossed into the eastbound lane and struck a 2002 Honda Civic operated by Jessie Kater (F)(25) of Brownsville, OR. 

Kater sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Sanders and his two juvenile passengers were not injured in the crash.

OSP was assisted by the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Brownsville Fire Department, Lebanon Fire Department, and ODOT 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127623/20190915_043752.jpg

Motorcyclist dies in crash on Hwy 214 - Marion County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/15/19 9:20 AM
2019-09/1002/127622/20190914_180216.jpg
2019-09/1002/127622/20190914_180216.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127622/thumb_20190914_180216.jpg

On Saturday, September 14, 2019 at approximately 4:46 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 214 near mile post 41.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by Travis Corter (50) of Hillsboro, was eastbound in the westbound lanes passing a car.  He collided with a westbound Chevrolet Volt operated by Massoud Jourabchi (64) of Beaverton.

Corter sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Three of the five occupants of the Chevrolet Volt were transported to Salem Hospital for minor injuries. 

OSP was assisted by Mt. Angel Fire Department, Woodburn Fire Department, Woodburn Ambulance, and ODOT.  




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127622/20190914_180216.jpg

Fri. 09/13/19
Public Health Advisory Board meets September 19
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/19 3:15 PM

Aug. 2, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets September 19

What: A public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Discuss 2019-21 legislative investment in local public health authorities; discuss statutes guiding the transfer of local public health authority and state responsibilities; review the Oregon Water Vision; discuss public health system changes and the role of the board in the 2019-21 biennium.

When: Thursday, Sept. 19, 2-4:15 p.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Also available remotely by phone at 877-873-8017, access code 767068; and by webinar.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and the State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan subcommittees set meetings through October
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/19 3:10 PM

September 13, 2019

What: Subcommittees of the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) tasked with identifying strategies and measures, and developing work plans for implementing the SHIP, are holding their second meetings. Each of the five subcommittees is focused on one of the following priority areas:

  • Access to equitable preventive health care.
  • Adversity, trauma and toxic stress.
  • Behavioral health.
  • Economic drivers of health.
  • Institutional bias.

Agenda: Finalize priority goal and identify outcome measures.

Where: All meetings are held on the ninth floor of the Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Meetings also are available remotely. For remote meeting attendance options visit the subcommittee's meeting page:

When:

  • Behavioral Health Subcommittee -- Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2-4 p.m., Room 900.
  • Access to Equitable Preventive Health Care Subcommittee -- Monday, Sept. 30, 1-3 p.m., Room 900.
  • Adversity, Trauma and Toxic Stress Subcommittee -- Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2-4 p.m., Room 900.
  • Institutional Bias Subcommittee -- Wednesday, Oct. 16, 10 a.m. to noon, Room 915.
  • Economic Drivers of Health Subcommittee -- Friday, Oct. 25, 1-3 p.m., Room 900.

All meetings are open to the public. A five-minute public comment period will be held near the end of each meeting; comments are limited to one minute.

Background: Oregon’s SHIP identifies interventions and strategies to address health-related priorities in the state. The SHIP serves as a basis for taking collective action with cross-sector partners to improve heath of people in Oregon. The SHIP is based on findings of the State Health Assessment.

Program contact: Christy Hudson, 971-678-4347, isty.j.hudson@dhsoha.state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Catherine Moyer at 971-673-1132, 711 TTY, ine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us">catherine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2kgOW5M


Dental Pilot Project Rules Advisory Committee meets September 30
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/19 2:44 PM

September 13, 2019

What: The Oral Health Program at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division is convening a series of rules advisory committee (RAC) public meetings to discuss amendments to rules related to Dental Pilot Projects.

The purpose of the RAC is to provide feedback and input on the development of amended rule language, as well as review the statement of need and fiscal impact for the proposed rules.

Agenda: Review background information; brief overview of the rulemaking process; review draft amended rules; next steps. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

When: Sept. 30, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 900, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference line: 888-273-3658, access code: 766409.

Background: Senate Bill 738, passed by the Legislature in 2011, allows the Oregon Health Authority to approve dental pilot projects once an application has been approved. These projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce and efficacy aspects of teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; develop new categories of dental personnel; accelerate the training of existing categories of dental personnel; and teach new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Materials: Meeting materials are available from the Dental Pilot Project's webpage at healthoregon.org/dpp.

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2mg2Dme


North Tenmile Lake recreational use health advisory lifted Sept 13
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/19 2:05 PM

Sept. 13, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

North Tenmile Lake recreational use health advisory lifted Sept 13

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued for North Tenmile Lake in Coos County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in North Tenmile Lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, officials advise recreational visitors to be alert to signs of cyanobacterial (harmful algae) blooms, because blooms can develop and disappear on any lake through the season. Only a fraction of Oregon’s lakes and streams are monitored for cyanobacterial blooms.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water. If you see these signs avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

It’s possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes, cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.


Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets September 19 in Salem
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/19 1:41 PM

Sept. 13, 2019

Media contact: Rebeka Gipson-King, 503-945-7141, ebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us">rebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852, jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets September 19 in Salem

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board.

When: Thursday, Sept. 19, 1-5 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Hospital, Callan Conference Room, 2600 Center Street NE, Salem. The public can also attend via toll-free conference line at 888-278-0296, access code 4294893.

Agenda: After the public comment period, topics will include introduction of the new OHA Behavioral Health director, updates on Psychiatric Security Review Board (PSRB) oversight, policy for admission, and U.S. District court hearing.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the board’s website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at 503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Suspicious substance received at the Oregon State Penitentiary
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/13/19 1:36 PM

On September 13, 2019, at approximately 11:00 a.m., the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) mail room reported receiving an envelope with an unknown substance. The mail room, which is in a small building outside of the main Penitentiary, was secured and evacuated. As a precaution, one mail room employee was taken to the local hospital. The Oregon State Police were onsite, and the Salem Fire Department cleared the building as safe for employees to return to work.

On September 11, Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) also received an envelope with an unknown substance. The administration building was evacuated, and four employees were decontaminated and transported to a local hospital. The CCCF incident is still under criminal investigation.

At this time, these two incidents do not appear to be related. The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) is working with its law enforcement partners to determine next steps. More details will be released when available.

DOC’s 14 institutions receive thousands of pieces of mail every day. Each piece is opened and reviewed by DOC mail room employees. 

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses over 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.


Young Farmers & Ranchers Program Offers Ag Tour of SW Oregon Coast (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 09/13/19 12:41 PM
2019-09/5507/127605/OFB-YF_and_R-GREEN.png
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Sept.13, 2018
Contact: yfr@oregonfb.org or Jacon Taylor at 541.589.9694

Young Farmers & Ranchers Program Offers Ag Tour of SW Oregon Coast

Oregon Farm Bureau’s Young Farmers & Ranchers (YF&R) Committee invites farmers, ranchers, and others to an agricultural tour of the southwest Oregon Coast, Oct. 11-13.

The tour will be a fun, educational, three-day ag tour featuring a cranberry farm, sheep ranch, working forestland, and more stops along the scenic southwest Oregon Coast.

Current ag teachers can earn graduate credit from Oregon State University for continuing education if they attend the tour.

The tour will depart from Corvallis at 8 a.m. on Friday, Oct. 11, and will return by 5 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 13.

  • Get the registration form at OregonFB.org/agtour.
  • Cost is $40 per person.
  • The tour is open to voting and supporting Farm Bureau members. (Join Farm Bureau at at OregonFB.org/join.)
  • Lodging reservations and costs are the responsibility of attendees.
  • Transportation for the tour Friday, Saturday, and Sunday is included. Attendees are responsible for getting to the departure location in Corvallis (exact location to be determined). Most meals are included.
  • Space is limited. Register by Sept. 30!

For more information, email yfr@oregonfb.org or call Jacon Taylor at 541.589.9694.

###

Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Sharon Waterman is an OFB Hall of Fame honoree and operates a Century Ranch raising sheep, cattle, and timber in Bandon. She is OFB’s 16th president.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5507/127605/OFB-YF_and_R-GREEN.png

Bend cancer survivor wins $4.6 million Oregon's Game Megabucks jackpot (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 09/13/19 10:37 AM
2019-09/4939/127597/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg
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September 13, 2019 - Salem, Ore.  – Each time Stu MacDonald of Bend purchased his weekly Oregon’s Game Megabucks ticket, his wife, Claudia, would say, “Get the winning ticket.”

But when Stu went to purchase his tickets on Saturday, Sept. 7, Claudia forgot to tell Stu to get the winning ticket.

And Stu bought a ticket that was worth $4.6 million anyway.

“I am a very lucky guy,” MacDonald said. “I have survived cancer twice and here I am. This is amazing.”

MacDonald won the Oregon’s Game Megabucks jackpot on a quick pick ticket he purchased at Ashley’s Café on Northeast 3rd Street in Bend. MacDonald opted to take the bulk sum payment of $2.3 million, and after taxes took home $1.56 million.

"We are thrilled to learn that we sold a Megabucks jackpot,” said Tezra Kong, Director of Operations for Ashley’s. “We are excited for the team who sold the ticket. A big congratulations to our guests on their windfall. Some of the seller’s bonus will go back to the team that strive to delight our guests every day here at Ashley’s in Wagner Mall."

For selling the winning ticket Ashley’s Cafe will receive a 1-percent selling bonus of $46,000.

During the 2015-17 biennium, more than $28.9 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement in Deschutes County, where MacDonald lives and purchased the ticket. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.

The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/4939/127597/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

DPSST Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 09/13/19 10:34 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

September 9, 2019

Contact:  Staci Yutzie    503-378-2426

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel for Phase 3 will hold a regular meeting on September 19, 2019 from 10:00 a.m  to 2:00 p.m.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

 Agenda Items:

  1. Welcome 
  2. Review Content Drafts
  3. Assignments 
  4. Conclusion

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Health advisories lifted September 13 for Agate, Beverly, Seal Rock State Park, Neskowin and Rockaway beaches
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/19 9:20 AM

September 13, 2019

Health advisories lifted September 13 for Agate, Beverly, Seal Rock State Park, Neskowin and Rockaway beaches

The Oregon Health Authority today lifted public health advisories for contact with marine water at Beverly Beach, Agate Beach, and Seal Rock State Park Beach located in Lincoln County and Neskowin Beach and Rockaway Beach in Tillamook County. The health authority issued the advisories September 10 and 11 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

http://bit.ly/2lV06gT


The Oregon State Sheriffs' Association promotes school bus safety with new Public Service Announcement
Oregon State Sheriffs' Assoc. - 09/13/19 8:58 AM

 

The Oregon State Sheriffs Association (OSSA) has partnered with TGF Productions to produce a public service announcement highlighting the importance of school bus safety. “We are proud to help promote school bus safety,” said Sheriff Craig Roberts, President of the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association. “We know many kids ride the bus every day to and from school and we want to make sure they stay safe.” Oregon elementary school students participated in the public service announcement along with Sheriff’s from across the state. The School Bus Safety PSA will air in television markets throughout Oregon. The PSA reminds drivers to stop when the red lights are flashing to allow for kids to safely cross the street. While school buses remain one of the safest way for kids to get to school, accidents can happen. Making sure that other drivers obey the traffic rules is essential for student safety. The SafeOregon Public Service Announcement can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUMGz4AJmc0&feature=youtu.be

Contact: Kim Lippert, Community Relations Specialist, 503-785-5016 or klippert@clackamas.us


Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 26 - Jefferson County
Oregon State Police - 09/13/19 7:59 AM

On Friday, September 13, 2019 at approximately 2:10 A.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash at the intersection of Earl St. and Hwy 26 just west of Madras.

Investigation reveals that a Buick Lucerne, operated by Arrita Augustine Sampson (20) of Warm Springs, was traveling on Earl St. and failed to stop for the stop sign at the intersection with Hwy 26.  She drove into the path of an eastbound CMV operated by Brandon McMurrian (30) of Prineville.

Sampson sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

A passenger in the Buick, May Spino (18) of Warm Springs, was transported by ground to St.Charles - Madras and then by air to St.Charles - Bend for injuries.

McMurrian was not injured.

OSP was assisted by Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, Madras Police Department, Jefferson County Fire/EMS and ODOT.


Motorcycle crash results in fatality on Hwy 20 - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 09/13/19 7:43 AM

On Thursday, September 12, 2019 at approximately 4:49 P.M. OSP Troopers and  emergency personnel responded to a report of a crash on Hwy 20 near milepost 35 east of Sweet Home.

The investigation revealed a Kawasaki motorcycle, operated by Michael Falcioni (58) of Terrebonne,  was traveling eastbound when he lost control in a curve and crossed into the path of a westbound Ford F250 pickup operated by Dale Zoon (53) of Sweet Home.

Falcioni sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Zoon was not injured.

OSP was assisted by Sweet Home Fire and Medics and ODOT.


Thu. 09/12/19
OHA statement in response to FDA announcement to ban flavored e-cigarettes
Oregon Health Authority - 09/12/19 4:32 PM

September 12, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA statement in response to FDA announcement to ban flavored e-cigarettes

On Wednesday the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a news release announcing that the agency plans to finalize a compliance policy that would clear the market of unauthorized flavored e-cigarette products. The science is clear. Flavors are a key component of youth use and initiation of tobacco products, which is a major public health concern in Oregon.

In 2018 and 2019 OHA submitted comments to the FDA on the following dockets urging the FDA to take action on flavored tobacco products, including e-cigarettes:

Tobacco remains sweet, cheap, and easy to get in Oregon, and is the leading cause of preventable death and disease, killing nearly 8,000 Oregonians each year. E-cigarettes are the most popular tobacco products used among Oregon youth, with 21 percent of Oregon 11th graders reporting e-cigarette use in 2018. These products are available in thousands of flavors with kid-friendly names and candy-like packaging.

In Oregon, two people have been connected to the ongoing national outbreak of vaping-related severe lung illness. In one case, the illness was fatal. OHA continues to work with CDC, FDA and local health departments to investigate each case. No specific brands of e-cigarettes, vaping devices or liquids have been conclusively linked to the illnesses at this time.

If you or someone you know is ready to quit smoking or vaping, free help is available from the following resources:




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3687/127577/Oregon-Health-Authority-FDA-2019-D-0661-0001.pdf , 2019-09/3687/127577/Oregon-Health-Authority-FDA-2017-N-6565.pdf

Fatal Crash SR 201N near Ontario -- Malheur County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/12/19 4:29 PM
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into this morning’s fatal crash on SR 201N near Ontario. 

On Thursday September 12, at about 11:18 AM, OSP troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on SR 201N and NW 4th Ave near Ontario.

Preliminary Investigation indicates that a 2016 Ford F650 Uhaul Truck pulling a loaded car dolly, operated by Jimmie CAVANESS, age 71, from Centrailia, WA, was eastbound on NW 4th Ave attempting to cross SR 201N.  A 2007 Kenworth tractor and lowboy equipment operated by Nicholas KOTEK, age 34, from Meridian, ID, was southbound on SR 201N approaching NW 4th Ave.  For an unknown reason the Uhaul pulled out in front of the Kenworth and the front of the Kenworth collided with the driver’s side door of the Uhaul. 

CAVANESS was pronounced deceased at the scene.  KOTEK was uninjured.

Investigators are looking at Failure to obey a Traffic Control Device (Stop Sign) on the part of CAVANESS as a possible contributing factor in the crash. 

The northbound lane of SR 201N were closed for approximately 3 hours.

OSP was assisted by Ontario Police Department, Ontario Fire Department, Treasure Valley Paramedics, and ODOT.      

Photographs provided by OSP.


### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127576/SR210N_(2).jpg , 2019-09/1002/127576/SR201N_(1).jpg

Three-Vehicle crash on State Route 82 Results in a Fatality - Wallowa County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/12/19 4:21 PM
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On Wednesday, September 11, 2019 at about 10:30 a.m., Oregon State Police (OSP) and emergency personnel responded to a three-vehicle crash on State Route (SR) 82 near milepost 38.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Ford F150 pickup, operated by Christy ERICKSON, age 31, from La Grande, with two child passengers, was eastbound negotiating a curve when her vehicle left her lane of travel and sideswiped an on-coming Subaru Outback, operated by Mary IMPORTICO, age 31, and passenger Ryan IMPORTICO, age 32,both from Portland. The collision caused the Ford to continue to the left into the oncoming lane and struck a Dodge Ram pickup pulling a trailer nearly head-on, operated by Colby RIMMER, age 25 and passengers Daniel RIMMER, age 53, Michael CRAMER, age 41, and John KRAUS, age 38, all from California.

All three occupants from the Ford were transported to the Wallowa County Hospital where one child passenger was pronounced deceased at the hospital. The second child passenger was transported by air ambulance to a Boise Hospital. ERICKSON was treated and released for her injuries and no other occupants were transported for injuries.

State Route 82 was closed for approximately five hours and one lane opened up for three hours while the on-scene investigation was conducted.

OSP was assisted by the Wallowa Fire Department, Enterprise Ambulance, Wallowa County Sheriff’s Office, Enterprise Police Department, and Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT).

Photograph provided by OSP.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127574/SR_82_(1).JPG

Hoover Criminal Gang Member Indicted for Racketeering After Murder of Portland Man
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/12/19 3:06 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, announced today the indictment of a Hoover Criminal Gang member for the 2015 murder of Portland resident Kyle Polk.

Javier Fernando Hernandez, 23, is charged with murder in aid of racketeering, using and carrying a firearm during a crime of violence, and causing the death of Polk through the use of a firearm.

The indictment alleges that on December 16, 2015, Hernandez murdered Kyle Polk for the purpose of maintaining and increasing his position in the Hoover Criminal Gang, a criminal enterprise engaged in racketeering in California, Oregon, Washington and elsewhere.

Hernandez made his initial appearance in federal court today and was detained pending a four-week jury trial on November 12, 2019 before U.S. Chief District Court Judge Michael W. Mosman.

Murder in aid of racketeering carries a maximum sentence of death or life in prison.

According to the indictment, the Hoovers are a criminal street gang operating in Oregon, and are known to engage in acts of violence including murder, assault, robbery, sex trafficking and the distribution of narcotics. The Hoovers originated in Los Angeles in the late 1960s and established a presence in Portland in the early 1980s. The gang has a loose hierarchical structure in which members have different amounts of power and influence based on age and gang activity. To maintain status and increase one’s position in the gang, members were expected to carry out violence on behalf of the enterprise.

This case was investigated by the FBI, the Portland Police Bureau, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office and Homeland Security Investigations and is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts.  PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon Farm Bureau statement on WOTUS repeal
Oregon Farm Bureau - 09/12/19 1:27 PM

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 12, 2019

Oregon Farm Bureau statement on WOTUS repeal

The following statement about the repeal and replacement of the Waters of the U.S. rule (WOTUS) may be attributed to Oregon Farm Bureau.

Sept. 12, 2019, SALEM, OREGON: “Oregon Farm Bureau applauds the repeal and replacement of the WOTUS rule. The WOTUS rule enacted by the previous administration exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers’ jurisdiction, could have required farmers to get permits just to work on their fields, and would have opened farmers up to costly citizen suit litigation. 

“Oregon already has strong water quality and fill-and-removal regulations. The rule proposed by the previous administration would not add anything, it would only give litigious environmental groups the ability to bring citizen suits against farmers who are already working to improve and protect water quality. We think enforcement is best left to the state, and the rule enacted by the current administration will help accomplish that goal.

“Oregon’s farmers and ranchers have always been proactive about protecting water quality. We supported Oregon’s agricultural water quality program, which was one of the first in the nation and has done a great job of protecting water quality in our state. Farmers and ranchers have also invested millions of dollars in on-the-ground work to help protect water quality on agricultural lands. OFB believes in working collaboratively with partners to achieve water quality goals, not in allowing farmers to be subjected to costly litigation with no measurable change in water quality.” 

###

Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Sharon Waterman is an OFB Hall of Fame honoree and operates a Century Ranch raising sheep, cattle, and timber in Bandon. She is OFB’s 16th president.


Pine Hollow Reservoir Ground-Breaking for New Boat Ramp (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 09/12/19 10:39 AM
Facility Designer Joe Glossop (OSMB) with new signs (image left) and Jeff Howell from Legacy Contracting (left), Janine Belleque from the Marine Board (center) and Bill Brackman, SWPRD (right) broke ground as a symbol of the boat ramp upgrades to come (im
Facility Designer Joe Glossop (OSMB) with new signs (image left) and Jeff Howell from Legacy Contracting (left), Janine Belleque from the Marine Board (center) and Bill Brackman, SWPRD (right) broke ground as a symbol of the boat ramp upgrades to come (im
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/4139/127552/thumb_PineHollow.png

Over ten years in the making, the South Wasco Parks and Recreation District’s efforts to secure funding for a new boat ramp at Pine Hollow has come to fruition.  On August 28, officials, local residents, and organized groups gathered at Pine Hollow’s old South Boat Ramp to break ground symbolizing the work ahead; to repair the south boat ramp and replace the North Boat Ramp.

Brian Manning, Chair of the South Wasco Park and Recreation District’s Board said, “There are many folks to acknowledge in the crafting of this outcome, so it was decided to celebrate the accomplishment with a ground-breaking ceremony and public description of the work ahead.”

The work is slated to begin September 17, 2019.  The South Ramp will be closed to allow contractors to mobilize construction materials to begin work.

Marine Board staff had been discussing the status of the boat ramps with numerous interested parties for the last 13 years, according to Boating Facilities Manager, Janine Belleque.  Agency staff also invested more than 850 hours of technical assistance through site surveys, design and engineering services.

Marine Board Member, Craig Withee (Bend, OR), made a heartfelt presentation during the ground-breaking ceremony saying, “We are very excited to see the successful completion (of the ramps) and the economic benefits for the county to follow. This is a great accomplishment and worth celebrating.” 

Pine Hollow is a popular recreation facility and significant economic generator for South Wasco County. The rehabilitation of the two access points will help sustain recreational opportunities for visitors and residents while also supporting local businesses.

###

The Marine Board is directly funded by boaters in the form of registration, title, and permit fees, as well as through marine fuel taxes. No lottery, general fund tax dollars or local facility parking fees support the agency or its programs. Boater-paid fees support the boating public through boating safety services (on-the-water law enforcement, training, and equipment), boating safety education, grants for the construction and maintenance of boating access facilities, and environmental protection programs. For more information about the Marine Board and its programs, visit www.boatoregon.com.




Attached Media Files: Facility Designer Joe Glossop (OSMB) with new signs (image left) and Jeff Howell from Legacy Contracting (left), Janine Belleque from the Marine Board (center) and Bill Brackman, SWPRD (right) broke ground as a symbol of the boat ramp upgrades to come (im

Chamber of Commerce recognizes district with Duane Wollmuth Catalyst Award (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 09/12/19 9:59 AM
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WALLA WALLA – Walla Walla Public Schools received the Duane Wollmuth Catalyst Award at the Walla Walla Valley Chamber of Commerce 2019 Business Showcase Wednesday evening at Baker Boyer Bank’s main branch. The Duane Wollmuth Catalyst Award recognizes an individual, business or organization which collaborates and motivates to make Big Things happen in the Walla Walla valley, according to the Chamber of Commerce.

Walla Walla Public Schools School Board President Ruth Ladderud and Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith accepted the award on behalf of the school district. Walla Walla Public Schools was recognized for last November’s successful bond measure, the school board’s state Board of Distinction award, improved academic achievement, higher graduation rates and partnerships with local agencies for addressing social and emotional needs of students.

“This award would not have been possible without our amazing school board, staff, parents, students and community who have rallied around our efforts to improve student learning and address our aging facilities through the passage of the largest bond in district history,” said Superintendent Smith. “We are honored to receive this award and remain committed to realizing our vision of Developing Washington’s Most Sought-After Graduates.”

Walla Walla Public Schools will celebrate receiving the Duane Wollmuth Catalyst Award at its Sept. 17 school board meeting and display the award at its district office.

###

PHOTO: L-R – School Board President Ruth Ladderud and Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1288/127548/Chamber_Award_2019.jpg

Fatal Truck Crash Interstate 5 near Rogue River -- Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/12/19 9:52 AM
2019-09/1002/127547/I_5_Valley_of_the_Rogue.jpg
2019-09/1002/127547/I_5_Valley_of_the_Rogue.jpg
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into this morning’s fatal truck crash on Interstate 5 near Rogue River. 

On September 12, 2019 at about 3:39 AM, OSP troopers and emergency personnel responded to a fatal truck crash on Interstate 5 near milepost 45. 

Preliminary investigation indicates that an International Box Truck hauling electronics, operated by Pavlo HRYZHUK, age 21, from Citrus Heights, CA, was traveling southbound on Interstate 5.  For unknown reasons the truck drifted to the right and collided with a large section of guardrail before traveling off a bridge and coming to rest on the roadway below.  The truck came to rest on Twin Bridges Road, which is the access to Valley of the Rogue State Park. 

HRYZHUK was pronounced deceased at the scene by first responders.  Investigators are looking at the possibility of fatigue contributing to the crash.

Interstate 5 traffic was not affected during the crash.  The northbound exit to Valley of the Rogue State Park is currently closed while the truck is being recovered. 

OSP was assisted at the scene by Oregon Department of Transportation, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office and Caveman Towing. 

Photograph provided by OSP.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127547/I_5_Valley_of_the_Rogue.jpg

Wed. 09/11/19
Suspicious powder received at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/11/19 12:22 PM
2019-09/1070/127533/CCCF_TVFR.JPG
2019-09/1070/127533/CCCF_TVFR.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1070/127533/thumb_CCCF_TVFR.JPG

On September 11, 2019, at 8:25 a.m., the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) mail room reported receiving an envelope with an unknown white powdery substance. The mail room area was secured and the administration building evacuated.

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Hazardous Materials Team and the Federal Bureau of Investigation are on site to evaluate the powder for any hazardous substances. Four employees were decontaminated and transported to a local hospital with minor symptoms.

More details will be released when available.

CCCF is a multi-custody prison located in Wilsonville accommodating 1,260 adults in custody. The prison has cell and dormitory housing, work programs, skills training, treatment programs, health services, religious services, physical plant, a central records unit, and administrative areas. CCCF participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a contact center, auto CAD, and document scanning. In addition, CCCF houses the state’s intake center, which provides intake and evaluation of all individuals committed to state custody by the courts. The intake center houses approximately 400 adults in custody. CCCF’s minimum facility opened in 2001, and the medium facility opened in 2002.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1070/127533/CCCF_TVFR.JPG

Oregon State Sheriff's Association Calls on Oregon Legislature to address catastrophic shortfall in Community Corrections funding
Oregon State Sheriffs' Assoc. - 09/11/19 11:32 AM

News release from: Oregon State Sheriffs' Association

OSSA calls on Oregon Legislature to address catastrophic SB 5504 shortfall in Community Corrections funding

The Oregon State Sheriffs' Association is calling on the Oregon State Legislature to take immediate action to address a devastating shortfall for Community Corrections in the Department of Corrections (DOC) budget. As partners in public safety, we share a responsibility to keep our communities safe, reduce crime and address the underlying factors that lead to criminal activity. We ask the Oregon Legislature to fix the devastating impact on public safety and address this funding shortfall.

THE PROBLEM:

As passed, the currently approved DOC budget (SB 5504) funds county community corrections operations statewide at a "baseline" level of $268.5 million. This amount drastically fails to take into account the findings of the recently completed Oregon Department of Corrections “Actual Cost Study” (ACS), which recommended an increase in baseline funding of nearly $50 million to counties to meet the actual cost of providing supervision services. This comprehensive study determined the actual time and cost to supervise the 30,000 people under some type of formal supervision in Oregon counties. The ACS looks at factors including the current risk of the offender population, time spent by county community corrections officials with those on supervision and the costs associated with sanctions and services provided to the offender population. This information is then used to determine the daily rate per individual on supervision which is paid by the state to the county for those services. The ACS findings resulted in an increase of the daily rate from $11.69 to $14.24 per client -- which in turn increased the 2019-21 Baseline Funding to $318 million as the amount necessary to meet the actual costs to counties for community corrections services. However, the Oregon Legislature did not approve funding to meet the increased daily rate resulting in counties having to shoulder unfunded services.

THE IMPACT:

The resulting reduction in baseline funding for statewide community corrections will have immediate, measurable, devastating impacts on county services that treat addiction and reduce recidivism. It will impact public safety and the quality of life in our local communities statewide.

The impacts across Oregon counties are significant:

Multnomah County impact: On Aug. 27, Multnomah County posted a press release on the impacts: https://multco.us/multnomah-county/news/board-updated-substantial-public-safety-cuts-due-reductions-legislature According to the release: The cuts affect the County’s Department of Community Justice, the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office and the Local Public Safety Coordinating Council. They translate to layoffs and losses in public safety staff, services and available jail beds. All of the cuts would leave people on parole or probation, or post prison release, with fewer services and interventions, public safety officials told commissioners. And the cuts will increase the number of people Multnomah County sends to the state’s prison system. Countywide reductions include: • Nineteen staff in the Department of Community Justice’s Adult Services Division, including corrections counselors, probation and parole officers, community justice managers as well as staff in the department's director's office. This includes the elimination of the County’s Change Center Program, a cognitive behavioral therapy program for people on supervision. • A jail dorm or 73 jail beds • 7.2 Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office corrections deputy positions • Reductions in Short Term Transitional Leave for people leaving prison • Reductions to the County’s Justice Reinvestment Program, which was created as part of a sweeping statewide initiative to reduce state prison costs. And because of the cuts, Sheriff Mike Reese said, the County’s jail system would surge past capacity, forcing daily releases of people who otherwise would stay in jail. Additional details, including reactions from Multnomah County Commissioners, can be found here: https://multco.us/multnomah-county/news/board-updated-substantial-public-safety-cuts-due-reductions-legislature

Marion County impact: • Overview of losses: Elimination of five full-time employees (FTEs), funding for Transitional Housing, and treatment programming within the county's Transition Center. Additional cuts will include a reduction in funding to Marion County's one-stop support center (the De Muniz Resource Center) and elimination of 2.5 full-time sworn and management staff. There will also be significant impacts to treatment and monitoring of sex offenders. • Estimated financial impact: $1.2 million • Estimated staff cuts: 7.5 full-time employees

Clackamas County impact: • Overview of losses: Approximately $1.4 million in cuts are expected, which would lead to the likely closure of the award-winning Transition Center, an all-in-one location providing crucial services to justice-involved individuals leaving jail or prison. (Learn more at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/transitioncenter.html ) At risk are positions for 12 Community Corrections staffers, including Parole and Probation Officers and client counselors. Current contracts for mentor, GED, housing, and client-basic-needs services could also be reduced or cut. • Estimated financial impact: $1.4 million • Estimated staff cuts: 12 Community Corrections employees.

Washington County impact: • Overview of losses: Closure of a 36-bed substance-abuse program (5 positions), as well as the elimination of six full-time Parole & Probation staff, a Community Corrections Assistant Manager, and contract recovery and peer mentors. • Estimated financial impact: $1.2 million • Estimated staff cuts: 12 Community Corrections employees. However, Washington County bridged the gap by temporarily supplementing part of the state's funding shortfall, saving six Probation & Parole staff positions; net loss is 6 positions. Hood River County impact: • Overview of losses: Inability to fully implement necessary evidence-based programs (cognitive, mental health, drug and alcohol). No funding to hire/contract for the aforementioned services. Insecure funding for custody alternative sanction (work crew). • Estimated financial impact: $220,000

"These are not marginal reductions," said OSSA President and Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts. "These are cuts that impact quality of life and public safety. Treatment and transition programs are critical to stop recidivism. By offering treatment, we keep people from returning to jail and prison -- which frees up space to house the most dangerous offenders. The loss of treatment beds will put a strain on our local correctional systems. This reduction is compounded for our Eastern and Southern Oregon Counties which are already fiscally and resource distressed. It's bad for public safety and bad for the public we serve. It will lead to increased crime and diminished quality of life."

MORE INFORMATION:

A June 25 letter sent to legislators by the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association is also attached to this release; it summarizes the findings of the Actual Cost Study and offers background on the legislation, as well as the responsibility of counties to provide parole, probation, and post-prison supervision services.

INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES:

Sheriffs are available to discuss these impacts -- and to connect reporters with people helped by the now-endangered programs in their counties. Please contact OSSA with interview requests.

[END]




Attached Media Files: June 25th Letter sent to Oregon Legislators

Advisories issued September 11 at Agate Beach, Beverly Beach and Seal Rock State Park Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 09/11/19 11:16 AM

Sept. 11, 2019

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Agate Beach, Beverly Beach and Seal Rock State Park Beach in Lincoln County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in these areas until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses.  This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While the advisory is in effect at Agate Beach, Beverly Beach and Seal Rock State Park Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. 

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Video and audio resources for media here.

 

 

 


Oregon's Wallowa Lake State Park showcases new "micro hydro" renewable energy resource at public open house Sept. 28
Pacific Power - 09/11/19 9:52 AM

Pacific Power media hotline:                                                  September 11, 2019

1-800-570-5838                                                     FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

                                               

 

Oregon’s Wallowa Lake State Park showcases new “micro hydro” renewable energy resource at

public open house Sept. 28

Free event will feature family-friendly activities and a chance to peek inside the park’s new micro hydro Power House

 

JOSEPH, Ore. — Nestled amongst the campgrounds, snow-capped mountains and gleaming waters of Wallowa Lake State Park lives a brand-new attraction: a small log cabin with a big new idea for producing clean, renewable energy for the region. The recently completed Power House is home to a micro hydropower turbine that uses the flow of the existing municipal water supply line near the head of Wallowa Lake to generate a continuous source of power.

 

            On Saturday, September 28, the public is invited to come get a special insider’s view during a free Power House Open House event. Tours of the micro hydro facility, short presentations and fun, hands-on activities for kids and families will provide a chance to learn more about the project. Guests can even take home a limited-edition bandana designed for the occasion.

 

The free event is hosted by Pacific Power, Wallowa Resources Community Solutions Inc., and Wallowa Lake State Park, who together with Energy Trust of Oregon, have helped bring the project to the park.

 

            “Wallowa Lake’s micro hydro project highlights how we can work together to grow renewable energy resources right here in our own backyard,” said Lori Wyman, Pacific Power’s regional business manager based in Eastern Oregon. “Through our partners and our own Blue Sky participants, this project will support our community for years to come, and hopefully inspire the park’s many visitors too.”

 

Annually, the new facility is expected to generate around 150,000 kilowatt hours of clean energy – enough to offset about 85 percent of the power needed to pump fresh drinking water to 160 nearby homes and businesses. Pacific Power’s Blue Sky customers provided $60,000 in funding to the micro hydro facility as part of its community project grant program, which supports community-based solar, wind, geothermal and renewable energy projects across Pacific Power’s service area. The project also received an $80,000 incentive from Energy Trust.

 

 “This project is a great example of using existing infrastructure and a local renewable resource to save energy dollars for the community and generate clean local energy,” said Kyle Petrocine, renewable energy program manager, Wallowa Resources.

 

Micro hydro works by converting the energy of moving water already used for irrigation, municipal or domestic use into mechanical energy, using a turbine. The turbine helps spins a generator which produces electricity. At the park, the new system directs water already flowing from State Park Springs through the Power House turbine before discharging back into the community water system. In cases where the community uses less water than the spring provides, the water eventually flows into Wallowa Lake.

 

Throughout the year, the Power House will welcome visitors with educational signage and windows allowing visitors to see the working turbine and generator from the outside in.

 

            Event Information

Power House Open House, hosted by Pacific Power’s Blue Sky program, Wallowa Resources and Wallowa Lake State Park

           

            Date: Saturday, September 28

           

            Time: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

 

How to get there: The event will be held at Wallowa Lake State Park, Wallowa Lake Hwy., Joseph, Oregon. Entrance to the event is from the Marina Parking Lot. Visitors can walk a short trail or ride a golf-cart shuttle to the Power House.

 

The event will also be held in conjunction with the community’s annual Alpenfest, taking place at the Wallowa Lake Marina the last weekend of September.

 

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About Wallowa Resources

Wallowa Resources Community Solutions Inc. (WRCSI) is an Oregon-based small business providing professional consulting services in renewable energy and natural resource-based business and economic development.  As Wallowa Resources’ for-profit subsidiary, WRCSI creates and sustains small businesses and jobs tied to natural resources and renewable energy by providing capital, business services and technical assistance.  WRCSI projects are characterized by a no-impact environmental footprint while providing community benefits in the form of improved bottom lines, county resilience and sustainable natural resource utilization.  Learn more at www.wallowaresources.org or call 541-426-8053.

 

About Wallowa Lake State Park

 

Wallowa Lake is a glacial lake at the base of the heavily glaciated Wallowa Mountains. This range is in the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest and includes the renowned Eagle Cap Wilderness.  Wallowa Lake State Park is a base from which visitors can explore the mountain country and the approaches to the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area on the Snake River.

 

The mission of the Parks and Recreation Department is to provide and protect outstanding natural, scenic, cultural, historic and recreational sites for the enjoyment and education of present and future generations. 

 

About Pacific Power and Blue Sky
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 740,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with 1.9 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company’s website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages, which can be accessed via pacificpower.net.

 

Blue Sky is an opt-in program that gives Pacific Power customers the opportunity to reduce their carbon footprint while supporting the development of new renewable energy. Through Blue Sky, customers can also invest in renewable energy projects for community-serving organizations. Since 2006, Pacific Power Blue Sky Block participants have supported more than 120 community-based solar, wind, geothermal and renewable energy projects across Pacific Power’s service area. To learn more, visit www.PacificPower.net/BlueSky.

 


FBI Seeking Individual Who May Have Information Regarding the Identity of a Child Sexual Assault Victim (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/11/19 8:06 AM
johndoe41 photo2
johndoe41 photo2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3585/127512/thumb_johndoe41b.jpg

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is seeking the public’s assistance with obtaining identifying information regarding an unknown male who may have critical information pertaining to the identity of a child victim in an ongoing sexual exploitation investigation.  Photographs and an informational poster depicting the unknown individual, known only as John Doe 41, are being disseminated to the public and can be found online at the FBI website at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/ecap.

The video depicting the unidentified male, John Doe 41, shown with a child, was first noted by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in March of 2018; therefore, the video is believed to have been produced around 2016 to 2018.

John Doe 41 is described as an African American male, likely between the ages of 18 and 20 years old.  He appears to be a thin-framed individual with black hair.  Anyone with information to provide should submit a tip online at https://tips.fbi.gov , or call the FBI’s toll-free tip line at 1-800-CALL-FBI (1-800-225-5324).  The public is reminded no charges have been filed in this case and the pictured individual is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty in a court of law.

This individual is being sought as part of the FBI’s Operation Rescue Me and Endangered Child Alert Program (ECAP) initiatives, both of which represent strategic partnerships between the FBI and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.  Operation Rescue Me focuses on utilizing clues obtained through in-depth image analysis to identify the child victims depicted in child exploitation material, while ECAP seeks national and international media exposure of unknown adults (referred to as John/Jane Does) who visibly display their faces and/or other distinguishing characteristics in association with child pornography images.

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Attached Media Files: johndoe41 poster , johndoe41 photo2 , johndoe41 photo