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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Sat. Sep. 19 - 8:07 am
Fri. 09/18/20
Pacific Power nears complete restoration in aftermath of Labor Day windstorm
Pacific Power - 09/18/20 6:23 PM

Media hotline: 503-813-6018

NOTE TO MEDIA: Images of restoration work underway are available for use, via this link. Photo credit: Pacific Power
 

Pacific Power nears complete restoration in aftermath of Labor Day windstorm

With repairs substantially complete, communities move to recovery and rebuilding

PORTLAND, Ore. (Sept. 18, 2020) —After 10 days of long shifts, with more than 500 personnel in the field at times, Pacific Power has substantially restored service to all the customers able to receive power.

As of 6 p.m., about 350 customers remain out. Certain isolated pockets of outages are expected to extend into next week. At peak, more than 60,000 customers were without service.

 “We thank our customers for their extraordinary patience during this challenging restoration and we will continue to support our communities as we help them rebuild,” said David Lucas, vice president of operations. “The power and resilience of our communities have truly shone through all these long days. And we salute our own folks in the field who showed tremendous commitment to serving our customers. These dedicated professionals will remain at work until all customers are restored.”

Here to help

Pacific Power customer care agents are available and ready to help customers through this incredibly difficult time. They can be reached 24/7 at 1-888-221-7070. 

The company is working with the Red Cross and local agencies to directly aid people in need. Assistance is available for those in wildfire-affected areas; contact the Red Cross for the latest shelter and emergency support information.

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2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - SEPT. 18, 2020
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/18/20 3:13 PM

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Lane County, Ore. - September 16, 2020 - A FEMA Mobile Emergency Response Support team installs mobile communications equipment on Mt. Hagen to replace  equipment destoryed by wildfire. - Don Sheppard / FEMA

Blue River, Ore. - September 15, 2020 - The Holiday Farm Fire destroyed businesses, homes, and vehicles. - David Yost / FEMA


Coffee Creek Correctional Institution adults in custody return to facility after wildfire evacuation
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/18/20 2:16 PM

As of September 18, 2020, adults in custody (AICs) who evacuated Coffee Creek Correctional Facility have returned to their home institution in Wilsonville. On September 10, the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) evacuated CCCF to Deer Ridge Correctional Institution (DRCI) in Madreas due to threats from the Riverside and Santiam wildfires. At that time, the institution was determined to be in potential danger as these two fires threatened to merge. DOC has worked with the Oregon State Police and the State Fire Marshal to keep everyone who works and lives inside this facility safe.

The total number of AICs evacuated from CCCF was 1,303, including AICs from the Coffee Creek Intake Center. The return trip spanned across four days so the department could rely on internal resources, including a fleet of buses—the majority of which included restrooms. Meals, water, and hygiene items were sent with each AIC, and a supply truck returned CCCF supplies that were taken to DRCI during the evacuation. In addition, an ADA accessible portable restroom was dropped partway along the route, and portable restrooms were made available at CCCF to mitigate any delay in processing AICs into the institution. Once DRCI’s medium facility was vacated, AICs being temporarily housed in the minimum facility returned to the medium facility—a move which was also completed on September 18.

DOC is aware of the impact the decision to evacuate may have had on the spread of COVID-19 within its facilities and took precautions to mitigate the impact whenever possible. While social distancing is always challenging in a prison environment—and made even more difficult in the midst of wildfire evacuations—masks continue to be provided and encouraged among all AICs and employees. In addition, DOC Health Services works closely with DOC transport and institutions to ensure AIC health needs are met during this difficult time.   

CCCF is a multi-custody prison located in Wilsonville accommodating 283 men and 1,020 women. The prison has cell and dormitory housing, work programs, skills training, treatment programs, health services, religious services, physical plant, a central records unit, and administrative areas. CCCF participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a contact center, auto CAD, and document scanning. In addition, CCCF houses the state’s intake center, which provides intake and evaluation of all individuals committed to state custody by the courts. CCCF’s minimum facility opened in 2001, and the medium facility opened in 2002.

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DOGAMI Governing Board to meet September 25
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 09/18/20 2:14 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet on Friday, September 25 at 8:30 a.m. to 1:40 p.m. The public portion of the meeting begins at 9:35 a.m. To adhere to the state’s social distancing requirements and to slow the spread of COVID-19, this public meeting will be conducted as a virtual meeting.

The meeting agenda is available at https://www.oregongeology.org.

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years. The Board meets at least quarterly. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.

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Oregon reports 295 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/18/20 1:38 PM

Sept. 18, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 295 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 521, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 295 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 30,342.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (4), Clackamas (28), Clatsop (3), Coos (2), Deschutes (7), Douglas (5), Hood River (1), Jackson (14), Jefferson (2), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (20), Linn (5), Malheur (20), Marion (51), Morrow (7), Multnomah (56), Polk (4), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (16), Wasco (3), Washington (36) and Yamhill (5).


New COVID-19 modeling released

OHA released its latest COVID-19 modeling report today, showing that the current rate of transmission is continuing a downward trend that began in mid-July, meaning that each case is generating less than one other case.

The model looked at the following scenarios:

If transmission continues at its present rate, then by Oct. 8. daily infections would decrease from 360 to 190. New daily cases would decrease to 80. Severe cases – those requiring hospitalization – would decrease to 6 and the reproduction rate would remain at .87.

If there is a 5-percentage-point decline in transmission, over the next month there would be 130 daily infections. New daily cases would decline to 50. Severe cases would drop to four, and the reproduction rate would be .74.

If there is a 5-percentage-point increase in transmission rates over the next month, the model projects 400 new daily infections with new daily cases rising by 80. Under this scenario, severe cases would double from six to 12.

More importantly, this scenario results in a reproduction rate of 1.0, meaning that the spread of COVID would be increasing, reversing the progress made in recent weeks.

As has been shown since the beginning of the pandemic in Oregon, these trends remain very sensitive to small changes in transmission levels.

Wildfires, which started on Labor Day, are widespread throughout Oregon and have led to evacuations of an estimated 40,000 people and extremely hazardous air quality.

The wildfires and subsequent poor air quality have decreased availability of community COVID-19 testing, but it is unclear what effects the evacuations and the poor air quality might have on COVID-19 transmission and symptoms.

Model results should be interpreted with caution, given these recent reductions in testing and uncertainty behind various COVID-19 model assumptions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Northern pikeminnow season extended, rewards increased - Anglers can make more money catching fish and saving salmon
Bonneville Power Administration - 09/18/20 11:54 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. – State and federal agencies are extending the season for the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program on the Columbia and Snake rivers until Oct. 11. They are also boosting the per-fish reward amounts for the remainder of the 2020 season.

Effective Sept. 19, the reward for all eligible northern pikeminnow will increase from the $5 to $8 range, to $10 per fish - regardless of how many northern pikeminnow an angler catches. The reward for verified specially-tagged northern pikeminnow will also temporarily increase from $500 to $1,000 per fish.

The program’s goal is to encourage more anglers to participate by harvesting predator-sized northern pikeminnow this fall, which will help protect more young salmon and steelhead from predation next spring.

“Large northern pikeminnow are responsible for eating a majority of the young salmon and steelhead who fall victim to predators,” says Eric McOmie, a BPA program manager. “Reducing the number of large pikeminnow can really help young salmon survive.”

For 30 years the Bonneville Power Administration has funded the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program, paying anglers to remove northern pikeminnow from the Columbia and Snake rivers and protecting endangered juvenile salmon and steelhead. The program’s goal is not to eliminate native northern pikeminnow but reduce the average size and number of the predatory fish.

The 11-day extension offsets the delay at the start of the season in May due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also appears the pandemic may have discouraged some anglers from participating in the sport-reward fishery, as the number of anglers is down 28% from this time last year. Currently, the 2020 harvest of northern pikeminnow is on track to be the lowest on record.

According to recent data, anglers are catching more northern pikeminnow now than any other time of the season, but fewer people are participating in the program. Average harvest for the past 29 years is approximately 174,000 fish. Last year, anglers removed approximately 146,000 northern pikeminnow from the Columbia and Snake rivers. So far this year, that number is just over 88,000.

Nearly anyone can make money fishing for northern pikeminnow, and biologists say late summer and early fall can be one of the best times of the year to catch the salmon eaters. In 2019, the program paid out nearly $1.2 million to northern pikeminnow anglers, with the top fisherman making more than $53,000.

For more details on the season extension and reward increases, go to www.pikeminnow.org.

 About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov

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ODF fire report for Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/18/20 10:24 AM
Firefighters at the Echo Mountain Complex in Lincoln County work on a fire control line.
Firefighters at the Echo Mountain Complex in Lincoln County work on a fire control line.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1072/138220/thumb_2020_09_14-15.31.22.943-CDT.jpeg

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Department of Forestery is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, (see table below for details). Echo Mountain and the North Cascade complexes were removed from today’s report. Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment. There are more than 6,500 personnel assigned to these fires from across the nation and Canada. This doesn’t include the many government emergency response employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing to the fight in whatever way they can. About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

192,719

10%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,012

20%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

172,510

10%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

137,865

10%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

130,429

25%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

44,800

20%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

41,395 in Oregon

10%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,833

35%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

37%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,995

15%

E of Diamond Lake

Please note: The acres burned estimates above are based very limited information available. These numbers will change over the next several days, in some cases significantly. We will be taking every opportunity to map these fires. Fire maps are an important tool for both ongoing response operations and keeping people informed. 

More information




Attached Media Files: ODF fire report for Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 , Firefighters at the Echo Mountain Complex in Lincoln County work on a fire control line.

Building Codes Division can help people locate manufactured home ownership documents
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/18/20 9:25 AM

(Salem) – Thousands of Oregonians have evacuated to escape wildfires that have damaged and destroyed homes throughout the state. Many who evacuated did not have time to take important documents with them, including ownership documents for their manufactured home, and those documents may now be destroyed.

The Oregon Building Codes Division’s online system can provide manufactured home owners with that information, including the record of ownership. Having these documents is important when navigating the insurance process.

The Oregon Manufactured Home Ownership Document (MHOD) system is available at https://aca-oregon.accela.com/OR_MHODS/. The system allows people to search for their documents and, once they find them, print or email them.

“These times are stressful enough without having to locate ownership documents in a damaged or destroyed manufactured home,” said Lori Graham, interim administrator of the Building Codes Division, which is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services. “Using the MHOD system is the easiest and quickest way for people to get their documents. Yet, if they need help, we can send them a printed copy.”

If customers need an existing ownership document mailed to them, but are displaced from their home, they can email or call, and the division can send it to any address customers want. Call 503-378-4530 or 800-442-7457 (toll-free) or email mhods.bcd@oregon.gov for help.

The MHOD system also has forms and applications, as well as other resources. People can access the records without needing to log in.

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The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.

The Building Codes Division administers Oregon’s statewide building code, which provides uniform standards that ensure newly constructed residential and commercial buildings are safe for people to occupy.


Thu. 09/17/20
Board considers bringing PreK-2 students back by transitioning to Yellow Stage based on recent viral trends (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 09/17/20 4:18 PM
2020-09/1288/138203/Wade_Smith.jpg
2020-09/1288/138203/Wade_Smith.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1288/138203/thumb_Wade_Smith.jpg

WALLA WALLA – The school board has scheduled a special board meeting Sept. 29 to review data and make a decision on transitioning to the Yellow Stage of the district’s Roadmap to Reopening Schools based on an update from the Walla Walla County Department of Community Health. If the school board approves the transition to the Yellow Stage, the district will implement their Pk-2nd grade hybrid model for in-person instruction on Oct. 19 as approved by County officials. Communicated with parents prior to the start of school, most students would attend either a morning or afternoon session for face-to-face instruction, and receive their remaining learning remotely in order to comply with strict social distancing guidelines. A limited number of pre-identified students who receive special education, English learners and other remediation supports may be provided a full day experience on a case-by-case basis while in the Yellow Stage.

In a letter to Walla Walla County school administrators sent Sept. 17, Walla Walla County Department of Community Health (DCH) officials reported they have been monitoring COVID-19 disease activity throughout the county. Disease activity, as indicated by new cases/100,000 population over 14 days, has been decreasing over the past month, warranting a new recommendation on hybrid learning.

At this time, the overall Walla Walla County disease activity, and the City of Walla Walla, remain above the WA DOH recommendation, but rates have been steadily dropping throughout the last month. If current trends continue, local health experts project rates across the county will continue to drop below the DOH recommended benchmark by the middle of October. If rates reach 45 cases or less over a two-week period, this will permit WWPS to begin transitioning back their youngest learners as soon as October 19. 

“Advancing to the hybrid learning model is not expected to pose a significantly greater risk to staff and students than their current activities,” said Larry Jecha, M.D./MPH Health Officer, Walla Walla County. “A Hybrid mode permits schools to provide in-person instruction at roughly 50% capacity.”  

If viral counts permit, and the Board approves transition to the Yellow Stage, the district plans to communicate schedules, bussing and other health-related protocols to Prek-2nd grade families the week of October 5. Once viral conditions dip below 30 cases or less over a two-week period, WWPS would then be in a position to bring back all students under their hybrid-learning plan. More information regarding the district’s Safely Reopening Schools Plan can be found on their website here: https://www.wwps.org/safely-reopening-schools  

“These dates allow sufficient time to continue to monitor disease activity through the end of September to ensure that it will not escalate significantly,” said Dr. Jecha. “Strict adherence to COVID-19 protocols, according to state and local guidance, including use of face coverings and physical/social distancing will be necessary to ensure that students and staff are able to return safely.”

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Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1288/138203/Wade_Smith.jpg , 2020-09/1288/138203/WWPS_Safely_Reopening_Roadmap.jpg

Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Troopers Requesting Public's Assistance with Unlawful Killing/Waste of Elk - Lincoln County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/17/20 4:01 PM
2020-09/1002/138201/20200823_123146.jpg
2020-09/1002/138201/20200823_123146.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1002/138201/thumb_20200823_123146.jpg

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public's help locating the person(s) responsible for the unlawful killing of a spike bull elk and cow elk in Lincoln County.

On Sunday, August 23, 2020, a Newport OSP Fish and Wildlife Trooper discovered a deceased spike bull and cow elk.

The elk were located on the USFS 5390 road just outside of Waldport.

The cow elk was left to waste with no meat removed from the carcass and was not salvageable.  Most of the meat had been taken from the spike elk.   

The elk were most likely shot the evening prior - Saturday, August 22, 2020.

OSP is asking anyone who was in the area or anyone who may have information on the suspect(s) to call the TIP line at 1-800-452-7888 or dial OSP or by email TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

 

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

Or the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish.  Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

 

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 Illegally Obtaining License/Tag(s)

$200 Unlawful Lend/Borrow Big Game Tags(s)

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity:

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

 

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1002/138201/20200823_123146.jpg

Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery Update - Sept. 17, 2020  (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/17/20 3:56 PM
An Oregon Army Guard HH-60M Black Hawk helicopter empties a water bucket onto flames on the Brattain Fire on September 15, 2020 near Paisley, Ore. Two Army Guard Black Hawks, headquartered out of Salem, Ore. are currently assigned to the fire. The helicop
An Oregon Army Guard HH-60M Black Hawk helicopter empties a water bucket onto flames on the Brattain Fire on September 15, 2020 near Paisley, Ore. Two Army Guard Black Hawks, headquartered out of Salem, Ore. are currently assigned to the fire. The helicop
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138200/thumb_200915-Z-NJ272-003.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or fire.info@state.or.us 




Attached Media Files: An Oregon Army Guard HH-60M Black Hawk helicopter empties a water bucket onto flames on the Brattain Fire on September 15, 2020 near Paisley, Ore. Two Army Guard Black Hawks, headquartered out of Salem, Ore. are currently assigned to the fire. The helicop , Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers and Citizen-Airmen with NG1 team six, grid an area of the Two-Four-Two fire during mop up operations, Chiloquin, Ore., Sept. 14. Approximately 1000 Oregon Guard members are supporting overall firefighting efforts wit

Fatal Crash on Hwy 212 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 09/17/20 3:50 PM

On Wednesday, September 16, 2020 at approximately 5:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 212 near Hwy 224.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Kawasaki motorcycle, operated by Dakota Teeter (20) of Milwaukie, was eastbound on Hwy 212 when it left the roadway and struck the guardrail.

Teeter sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office and Clackamas Fire.

 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 18 - Yamhill County
Oregon State Police - 09/17/20 3:40 PM

On Wednesday, September 16, 2020, at approximately 8:35 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 18 near milepost 48.

Preliminary investigation indicates that a Nissan Sentra, operated by Matthew Revelette (34) of Healdsburg, CA. was stopped at the stop sign at the intersection of Cruickshank Rd. and Hwy 18. The Nissan proceeded north across Hwy 18 and into the path of a eastbound Yamaha motorcycle operated by Anthony Banta (29) of Newberg.  The Yamaha and Nissan collided.

Banta sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

The eastbound lane of Hwy 18 was closed for approximately 4 hours following the crash. 

OSP was assisted by Yamhill County Sheriff's Department, ODOT, McMinnville Police Department and McMinnville Fire Department.


"Working While Claiming" Lets Oregonians Earn More Before Benefits Are Reduced
Oregon Employment Department - 09/17/20 3:39 PM

September 17, 2020 (SALEM, ORE.)—Today the Oregon Employment Department announced an update to the “Working While Claiming” program, a result of Oregon Senate Bill 1701. It allows Oregonians to work and earn more each week before having their weekly benefit amount reduced.

“We are glad to share another piece of positive news today with the implementation of Senate Bill 1701. This change in how earnings are reported for those who are “working while claiming” allows us to put more unemployment benefits in the hands of under-employed Oregonians. Originally anticipated to be complete in December, we are proud of our ability to get ahead on this programming change while keeping our other IT priorities on track,” said David Gerstenfeld, acting director of the Oregon Employment Department.

Senate Bill 1701 allows claimants to earn up to $300 before seeing a reduction in their weekly benefits. Claimants working 39 hours or less per week and earning less than their weekly benefit amount can earn up to $300 without seeing any change to their weekly benefits. Any amount earned over $300 will be reduced from their weekly benefit, dollar-for-dollar. However, claimants working 40 hours or more or earning the same or more than their weekly benefit amount in a week are not eligible to receive any benefits.

This statutory change is effective from September 6, 2020 through January 1, 2022. The new income threshold applies to all benefit programs, including regular Unemployment Insurance (UI), Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), and Extended Benefits (EB).

For Oregonians receiving any type of unemployment benefits during this period, adjustments to their weekly benefit amount will be automatic. Claimants do not need to contact the Department to request an adjustment, unless they made a mistake when reporting their earnings. For claims already paid this week, the Department will make manual adjustments as needed and will issue retroactive payments to claimants who qualify. 

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/930/138195/9_17__SB_1701_Implementation_FINAL.pdf

Basic Police Class 399 to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 09/17/20 3:33 PM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 399th Basic Police Class.

The Basic Police Class is 16-weeks in length and includes dozens of training areas including survival skills, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, ethics, cultural diversity, problem solving, community policing, elder abuse, drug recognition, and dozens of other subjects.

Basic Police Class 399 will graduate during a private ceremony at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon on Thursday, September 24, 2020

Due to the COVID 19 pandemic and the need for social distancing the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training regrets that this ceremony will be closed to the public. However, we would like to publicly congratulate the diverse group of men and women from agencies around the state who are members of Basic Police #399 on their successful completion of basic training.

Graduation Roster Basic Police BP399 / DPSST Class Coordinator: Robert Ledford

Deputy Sheriff Andres Aldana / Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Shelby Biencourt / Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

Police Officer Blake Bowers / Philomath Police Department

Police Officer Drake Brennan / Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

Police Officer Victor Brett / Tigard Police Department

Police Officer James Brewer / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Nicholas DePaulo / Umatilla Tribal Police Department

Police Officer Spencer Douglas / Tigard Police Department

Police Officer Garrett Garcia / Portland Police Bureau

Deputy Sheriff Kyle Geraci / Linn County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Jeobany Giron / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Brandon Halter / Roseburg Police Department

Police Officer Kyle Henderson / Tigard Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Kathleen Herboth / Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Jose Jimenez / Woodburn Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Dawson Jinkins / Douglas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Daniel Johnson / Union County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Yan Kuvaldin / Salem Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Kevin Lanier / Jefferson County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Scottie Lathrom / Brookings Police Department

Police Officer Ryan Lutz / Oregon City Police Department

Police Officer Jesse Manipol / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Morgan McBride / Salem Police Department

Police Officer Jared McLennan / Ashland Police Department

Police Officer Valeri Miller-Fillman / Oakridge Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Corey Nealeigh / Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Kelly Powell / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Sebastian Precup / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Valeria Ramirez / Salem Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Mark Rose / Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer William Schaap / Silverton Police Department

Police Officer Benjamin Schulz / Roseburg Police Department

Police Officer Nicholas Skelton / Salem Police Department

Police Officer Rachael Skjelstad / Beaverton Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Maksim Solnyshkin / Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Benjamin Stubbs / Beaverton Police Department

Police Officer Elliott Walker / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Samuel Whisler / Astoria Police Department

Police Officer Johnny Whitaker / Salem Police Department

Police Officer Anthony Young / Canby Police Department

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Colorado Man Charged With Hate Crime After Unprovoked Stabbing of Black Man
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/17/20 2:30 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that a Colorado man has been charged with a hate crime after stabbing a Black man from Ontario, Oregon while the man was sitting in a fast food restaurant.

A federal grand jury in Eugene has returned a one-count indictment charging Nolan Levi Strauss, 26, a Colorado resident, with a hate crime involving an attempt to kill.

According to the indictment, on the morning of December 21, 2019, a 48-year-old Black man arrived at an Arby’s fast food restaurant adjoining the Pilot Travel Center in Ontario where he planned to provide final documentation for a pending job application. The man sat in the lobby of the restaurant while waiting for the manager.

Unprovoked and without warning, Strauss approached the man from behind and stabbed him in the neck. Following a struggle for the knife, the man freed himself and Strauss was detained by store employees. When asked by the store employee why he attacked the man, Strauss stated he did so because the man “was Black, and I don’t like Black people.”

The stabbing resulted in two lacerations to the victim’s neck. Afterward, he was life-flighted to Boise, Idaho for emergency surgical intervention.

Strauss will make his first appearance in federal court on October 19, 2020. If convicted, he faces a maximum sentence of life in federal prison.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the Ontario Police Department, Oregon State Police, and the Malheur County District Attorney’s Office. It is being prosecuted by Gavin W. Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, and Cameron A. Bell, Trial Attorney for the Civil Rights Division.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon reports 215 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/20 1:24 PM

Sept. 17, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 215 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 521, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 215 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,060.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (11), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Deschutes (7), Douglas (1), Grant (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (14), Jefferson (7), Klamath (7), Lane (23), Linn (11), Malheur (11), Marion (28), Morrow (1), Multnomah (43), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (7), Washington (29), and Yamhill (3).

Testing Note: The Oregon State Public Health Laboratory resumed normal operations yesterday after a three-day closure caused by HVAC problems and related poor indoor air quality. The lab is once again accepting and testing specimens.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


ODF map of current Oregon wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/17/20 1:04 PM

SALEM, Ore. - Attached is a map of 12 current Oregon wildfires that the Oregon Department of Forestry. The map includes the largest wildfires currently burning in Oregon.




Attached Media Files: ODF fire map for Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020

Pacific Power adjusts outage numbers to reflect structures lost in windstorm aftermath
Pacific Power - 09/17/20 12:13 PM

Media hotline: 503-813-6018

NOTE TO MEDIA: Images of restoration work underway are available for use, via this link. Photo credit: Pacific Power

 

Pacific Power adjusts outage numbers to reflect structures lost in windstorm aftermath

As access to areas expands, company is better able to determine how many customers need to rebuild in order for electric service to be restored

PORTLAND, Ore. (Sept. 17, 2020) —As of noon., Sept. 17 Pacific Power has restored service to approximately 95 percent all of the customers in Oregon and northern California who lost power due to damage inflicted by a historic wind storm.

Current outage map numbers include some customers remaining out due to fire suppression efforts. At peak a week ago, more than 60,000 were without power. Pacific Power is at work to reconcile those numbers and assure that the information available to the public via its online outage map is line with actual circumstances on the ground.

“We are revising our outage numbers based on what we know now with the full knowledge that our customers are needing this information to rebuild and move forward,” said David Lucas, vice president of operations. “We are getting very close to restoring all the power that is possible for us to restore, but we know a tremendous amount of work remains for those customers who will need to rebuild or do significant repair work before service restoration is possible. We’re committed to helping simplify that work and lend a hand with temporary connections during reconstruction whenever possible.”

Based on customers able to receive power, current outages include:

 

  • Medford area, less than 500 customers
  • Happy Camp, Calif., approximately 250
  • Lincoln City, approximately 230
  • Glide/Umpqua Canyon, approximately 250

 

Pacific Power’s website will provide up-to-date estimates of local restorations times at www.pacificpower.net/outage-updates. This page will be updated as new information becomes available. Additional outage maps are available at: www.pacificpower.net/outages-safety.

Community spirit

Pacific Power employees are rolling up their sleeves wherever they can, supporting the communities they serve.

  • Linn County Relief Fund. Donated $10,000 to locally-initiated fund to help residents get back on their feet.
  • Douglas Timber Operators Relief Fund. Donated $2,500 to fund
  • Talent. Purchased and distributed N95 masks to Talent and Shady Cove residents who have been let back into their neighborhoods to assess damage.

How to be ready, how to get help

Pacific Power customer care agents are available and ready to help customers through this incredibly difficult time. They can be reached 24/7 at 1-888-221-7070. 

The company is working with the Red Cross and local agencies to directly aid people in need. Assistance is available for those in wildfire-affected areas; contact the Red Cross for the latest shelter and emergency support information.

Oregon:

  • Josephine County Fairgrounds – 1451 Fairgrounds Rd, Grants Pass
  • Jackson County Expo – 1 Peninger Rd, Central Point
  • Oregon State Fairgrounds – 2330 17th St. NE, Salem
  • Klamath County Fair Grounds – 3531 S 6th St, Klamath Falls
  • Kla-Mo-Ya Casino – 34333 US-97, Chiloquin
  • Lincoln City Community Center--2150 NE Oar Place
  • Linn County Fairgrounds – 3700 Knox Butte Rd E, Albany
  • Benton County Fairgrounds – 110 SW 53rd St, Corvallis
  • Deschutes County Fairgrounds – 3800 SW Airport Way, Redmond
  • Douglas County Fairgrounds – 2110 Frear St., Roseburg
  • Polk County Fairgrounds – 520 S Pacific Hwy W, Rickreall 

Northern California:

  • Kahtishraam Wellness Center – 1403 Kahtishraam, Yreka
  • Siskiyou County Fairgrounds (taking large animals) – 1712 Fairlane Rd, Yreka

 

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FBI Offers Reward of up to $10,000 in Fatal Arson Case in Warm Springs (Photo) (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/17/20 12:05 PM
Facebook ad - Warm Springs arson
Facebook ad - Warm Springs arson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3585/138174/thumb_Facebook_ad_-_Warm_Springs_arson_-_Sept_17_2020.png

The FBI is offering a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the identification, arrest, and conviction of the person or people responsible for an arson fire that killed one person and injured two others. The Warm Springs Police Department responded to a fire in a home located at 1713 Foster Street at approximately 11:05 p.m. on May 17, 2020. When the officers arrived, they saw flames shooting 15 feet out the front living room window. 

Officers entered the burning home, removed two victims, and provided medical assistance until paramedics arrived. Lamont Brown, age 77, died of his injuries following transport to a medical facility. The second adult victim removed from the residence suffered critical injuries. A third resident was able to exit the residence on her own but suffered serious burn injuries. A fourth person was able to escape through a ground-floor window and was uninjured.

Investigators with the Warm Springs Fire Department, the Jefferson County Fire Department, and the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office ruled the fire an arson. The FBI and Warm Springs Police Department are jointly investigating this case.

As part of this publicity effort, the FBI has created a "Seeking Information" poster which is attached and can be found at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/structure-fire---arson and a Facebook ad (attached).

Anyone with information concerning this fire is asked to contact the FBI in Bend at (541) 389-1202 during normal business hours, the FBI in Portland at (503) 224-4181 twenty-four hours a day, or the Warm Springs Police Department at (541) 553-3272. Information may also be submitted online at https://tips.fbi.gov 

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Attached Media Files: Poster - Warm Springs arson , Facebook ad - Warm Springs arson

Public invited to comment on proposed ATV access route in Sumpter
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 09/17/20 10:00 AM

Sumpter, Ore. — A proposed ATV access route designation would allow ATVs on a 1¼ mile segment of Sumpter Highway No. 410, located in the town of Sumpter, west of Baker City.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s (OPRD) All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee is soliciting public comments on the stretch that runs from approximately Cracker Creek Road to Sawmill Gulch Road (from milepost 0.0 to 1.18). If designated, the segment would provide ATV access to local businesses as well as Umatilla National Forest lands to the north and south of Sumpter.

Members of the public may submit comments about the proposed designation through Oct. 4; send comments via email to ATV.highway@oregon.gov.

A public conference call/webinar is scheduled for 6 - 7 p.m. Sep. 29, 2020 and will feature an overview of the proposed access route along with more information about the ATV Highway Access Routes program.

The public is invited to listen or view the presentation:

Individuals who need special accommodations to listen to the presentation, or need information in alternative formats, should contact Ian Caldwell, OPRD grants and community programs representative, at 541-410-5512 or ian.caldwell@oregon.gov

Learn more about the Oregon ATV Program at www.OregonOHV.org


The Bureau of Land Management seeks nominations to fill vacancies on National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/17/20 9:36 AM

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. — The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking nominations to fill three positions on its National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board. The National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board plays an important role in our efforts to be a good neighbor in states where the BLM and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) oversee wild free-roaming horses and burros. The Board advises the agencies on the protection and management of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands administered by those agencies.

 

Selected board members advise both the BLM and USFS in wild horse and burro management. This call for nominations is for the positions that represent natural resource management, public interest (with special knowledge of equine behavior), and wild horse and burro research.

 

The board typically meets twice annually, though the BLM may call additional meetings when necessary. Members serve a three-year term without salary, though members are reimbursed for approved travel and per diem expenses related to their activities on the board.

 

The board is comprised of nine members who represent a range of interests. Individuals qualify to serve on the board because of their education, training, or experience that enables them to give informed and objective advice regarding the interest they represent. Successful nominees will demonstrate experience or knowledge of the area of their expertise and a commitment to collaborate in seeking solutions to resource management issues.

 

Any individual or organization may nominate one or more persons to serve on the board; interested parties may also nominate themselves. However, current federal and state government employees are not eligible to serve on the board. 

 

If interested, please submit an application packet that includes a resume and nomination letter. Also provide the following information as part of the application packet:

 

  • The nominee’s first, middle, and last name
  • Position(s) for which the nominee wants to be considered
  • Business and home addresses and phone numbers
  • E-mail address
  • Present occupation/title and employer
  • Education (colleges, degrees, major field(s) of study)
  • Career highlights (significant related experience, civic and professional activities, elected offices, including prior advisory committee experience or career achievements related to the interest to be represented)
  • Relevant education, training, and experience
  • Experience or knowledge of wild horse and burro management
  • Experience or knowledge of horses or burros (equine health, training, and management).
  • Experience in working with disparate groups to achieve collaborative solutions
  • Identification of any BLM permits, leases, or licenses held by nominee or employer
  • Indication of whether the nominee is a federally registered lobbyist
  • Explanation of interest in serving on the Board
  • Reference letter(s) from special interests or organizations the nominee desires to represent. References may include, but are not limited to, business associates, friends, co-workers, and local, state and/or federal government representatives or elected officials. All nominations must include at least one letter of reference

 

Submit nominations by e-mail to Dorothea Boothe, Wild Horse and Burro Program Coordinator, at dboothe@blm.gov. To send by U.S. Postal Service, mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 9828 31st Avenue; Attn:  Dorothea Boothe, WO-260; Phoenix, Arizona 85051. To send by FedEx or UPS, please mail to the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Wild Horse and Burro Division, 9828 31st Avenue; Attn:  Dorothea Boothe; Phoenix, Arizona 85051. For questions, Ms. Boothe can also be reached by phone at (602) 906-5543 or at the email address listed above.

 

Nominations must be received no later than 45 days after the notice has been published in the Federal Register or postmarked by the same date. The BLM request for nominations appears in the Sept. 17, 2020 edition of the Federal Register.  For more information on the National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board, visit the BLM website at BLM.gov/WHB.

 

-BLM-

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.


Oregon Health Authority releases 2019 CCO Metrics Report
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/20 9:30 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 17, 2020

Oregon Health Authority releases 2019 CCO Metrics Report

Oregon coordinated care organizations (CCOs) continue to work on health system transformation by focusing on better care and better health outcomes while controlling health care costs. The 2019 CCO Metrics Report shares the results of Oregon’s pay-for-performance quality incentive program. To earn their full incentive payment, CCOs must meet benchmarks or improvement targets on at least 12 of the 16 measures, achieve a performance goal related to enrollment in patient-centered primary care homes, and report data for two electronic health records metrics.

"Oregon’s quality incentive program continues to play a key role in improving health outcomes and the care received by our more than 1 million members," said Jeremy Vandehey, OHA's director of health policy and analytics. "As individuals and families begin to re-engage with the health system after the significant disruption caused by COVID-19, these quality measures will help us see how effective CCOs are in connecting people to the care they need during challenging times."

The report includes three new measures: oral evaluation for adults with diabetes; preventive dental services; and well child visits in the third, fourth, fifth and sixth years of life. Preventive dental care and well child visits are part of a multi-year strategy focused on the health sector’s role in preparing children for kindergarten.

For the 2021 measurement year, the Metrics and Scoring Committee added a new measure focused specifically on health equity: Meaningful language access to culturally responsive health care services.

Report highlights

  • The percentage of children in foster care who received timely mental, physical and dental health assessments has improved by more than 200 percent since 2014.
  • Cigarette smoking prevalence declined among 13 of 15 CCOs in 2019. The overall smoking prevalence among CCO members decreased by nearly 9 percent.
  • Emergency department utilization among members with mental illness was first included in the Quality Incentive Program in 2018. In 2019, nine of 15 CCOs improved, and seven achieved their improvement target.

Additionally, 2019 was the first year postpartum care was included in the Quality Incentive Program. All but two CCOs achieved the benchmark or improvement target. This was also the first year timeliness of prenatal care was no longer an incentive measure. Statewide performance on this measure dropped by 12 percentage points, and no CCOs demonstrated improvement on the rate of women receiving timely prenatal care.

The quality pool model rewards CCOs for the quality of care provided to Oregon Health Plan members. This model increasingly rewards CCOs for outcomes, rather than utilization of services, and is one of several key health system transformation mechanisms for achieving Oregon’s vision for better health, better care and lower costs.

The quality pool comprised 4.25 percent of CCOs’ monthly payments in 2019, for a total of more than $166 million. While all CCOs showed improvement on a majority of measures, five out of 15 earned 100 percent of their quality pool dollars. Six CCOs met 11 of the benchmarked measures and 80 percent of their quality pool, and four CCOs earned 60 percent. This left nearly $46 million for the challenge pool. The challenge pool was distributed to CCOs that met the benchmark or improvement target on four measures that impact early childhood: assessments for children in ODHS custody, childhood immunization status, developmental screenings in the first 36 months of life and timeliness of postpartum care.

Changes to the program due to COVID-19

Early in the COVID-19 emergency, OHA evaluated sources of funding that could be released quickly to support CCOs and members during the emergency. Sixty percent of the 2019 quality pool dollars were distributed to CCOs in April, with the remaining balance released to CCOs in June based on the performance described in this report.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and related disruption to the health care system, the Metrics and Scoring Committee elected to modify the design of Quality Incentive Program for 2020 so that CCOs earn credit for reporting only.

For a detailed report of the CCO metrics and how much each CCO earned through the pay-for-performance program, visit the OHA Health Policy and Analytics website.

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Wed. 09/16/20
Fatal Crash on Hwy 199 - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 09/16/20 7:41 PM

On Tuesday, September 15, 2020, at approximately 7:02 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 199 near milepost 13.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Chevrolet Cavalier, operated by Timothy Ibarra (38) of Ashland, was southbound when it traveled into the northbound lane colliding with a Toyota operated by Jeffrey Roberts (42) of Wilderville.

Ibarra sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

Roberts was transported to the hospital for injuries.

OSP was assisted by Rural Metro Fire, ODOT, and the Josephine County Sheriff's Office


OHA's Weekly Report Shows Declining Case Count Trend
Oregon Health Authority - 09/16/20 5:00 PM

Sept. 16, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA’s Weekly Report Shows Declining Case Count Trend

Today’s Weekly Report showed that new cases in Oregon have continued to decline as 1,294 cases were recorded from Sept. 7-13 —down 12% from last week’s tally of 1,477. In that same period, the number of Oregonians newly tested declined 35%, to 17,365, and the percentage of tests that were positive rose from 4.3% to 5.6%. This decline in the number of Oregonians tested occurred during the context of numerous active wildfires. OHA is closely monitoring this situation.

Twenty-nine Oregonians were reported to have died last week in association with COVID-19, compared to 23 last week. Eighty-three Oregonians were hospitalized; and with 47 in the previous week, the reported number of Oregonians hospitalized with COVID-19 is the lowest for any two-week period since mid-June.

As in past weeks of declining case counts, OHA reminds Oregonians that it remains very important to continue to wear face coverings, practice physical distancing and avoid gatherings to sustain the progress the state has made.


Oregon joins Western States Pact in testing exposure notification technology

Governor Kate Brown announced today that Oregon has joined with Western States Pact members California, Washington, Colorado and Nevada in a pilot project to test COVID-19 exposure notification technology. The pilot project will test the Exposure Notification Express mobile application developed by Google and Apple. For those who voluntarily choose to use the exposure notification technology, the app confidentially notifies individuals who may have been exposed to someone who tested positive for the virus. Privacy and security are central to the design of the technology, which does not collect location data from any device and never shares user identities. Users must opt in to the technology.

“Knowledge is power when it comes to stopping the spread of COVID-19, and this pilot project will help people make informed decisions to keep themselves healthy, while still protecting individual privacy,” said Governor Brown. “COVID-19 knows no state borders, and my goal is to make sure, if more widely implemented, this exposure notification technology is made available to those communities that have been disproportionately impacted by this disease — Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Pacific Islander and Tribal communities, as well as those living in the rural parts of our states.”


Firefighters ask the public to keep personal drones on the ground to enable aircraft to engage on wildfires (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/16/20 3:23 PM
Once skies over Oregon start to clear, more aircraft will engage on wildfires. Firefighters are asking owners of personal drones to help by keeping their equipment grounded over and around wildfires.
Once skies over Oregon start to clear, more aircraft will engage on wildfires. Firefighters are asking owners of personal drones to help by keeping their equipment grounded over and around wildfires.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1072/138140/thumb_2020_09_12-17.38.42.662-CDT.jpeg

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon fire officials are expecting that as visibility improves, a large number of helicopters and planes will soon take flight and start engaging on the many wildfires in the state. They are appealing to  drone enthusiasts to not fly their equipment while skies over Oregon are so busy.

“We’re looking to Oregonians statewide to help us make the most of these resources and ensure our people stay safe by keeping their personal drones on the ground. If you fly, we can’t,” said ODF’s Chief of Fire Protection Doug Grafe.

Grafe said two key ways firefighters use aviation assets is to actively fight fires using water and retardant drops and to provide an aerial view of the fires, especially hidden hot spots that need extinguishing.

 “That aerial view informs our operational decisions and helps us provide accurate information about fire perimeters and activities to the public,” Grafe said.

State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said:, “We appreciate the cooperation from drone hobbyists. By keeping their drones on the ground for the time being, we’ll be able to get our helicopters and planes safely in the air fighting fires.”

Poor visibility over the state from the heavy smoke has prevented firefighting aircraft from fully engaging on wildfires. With forecasts calling for clearer skies in coming days, fire officials say the public should expect to see many more planes and helicopters in and around wildfires, sources of water and airstrips.

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Attached Media Files: Once skies over Oregon start to clear, more aircraft will engage on wildfires. Firefighters are asking owners of personal drones to help by keeping their equipment grounded over and around wildfires.

Affected Oregonians may enroll in health coverage due to Oregon wildfires (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/16/20 3:16 PM
Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace logo
Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1073/138138/thumb_OHIM_logo-left_text.png

(Salem) – Oregonians affected by the wildfires can use the federal emergency declaration by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to take advantage of an exceptional circumstances special enrollment period (SEP). FEMA declared the Oregon wildfires a federal emergency on Sept. 15, 2020.

Oregonians will have up to 60 days from the end of the FEMA-designated incident period to select a new health insurance plan through HealthCare.gov or make changes to their existing health insurance plan. People who experienced a life change are eligible for a standard special enrollment period that allows them to sign up for a plan 60 days before or 60 days after their life change to enroll in a plan. Examples of a life change include loss of coverage due to loss of employment, marriage, addition of a new family member, gaining lawful immigration status, and moving homes.

Oregonians who were eligible for a standard special enrollment period, but missed this window due to the Oregon wildfires, can use the FEMA SEP to enroll in a plan. Applications are being accepted at HealthCare.gov if the life change is a loss in coverage and at 800-318-2596 (toll-free) for all other life changes.

The FEMA SEP due to the Oregon wildfires is available for people who qualified for a special enrollment period from Sept. 8 through up to 60 days after the FEMA emergency has ended. The declaration of emergency for the Oregon wildfires was issued Sept. 15, 2020, and is still active. Oregonians still have at the very earliest until Nov. 15, 2020 to use the FEMA SEP.

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace logo

Portland Man Charged in June 26, 2020 Arson at Portland Police Bureau North Precinct (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/16/20 2:57 PM
Photo
Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6325/138136/thumb_Photo4.JPG

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that Gavaughn Gaquez Streeter-Hillerich, 22, has been charged by criminal complaint with two counts of using fire to maliciously damage and attempt to damage a building housing the Portland Police Bureau’s North Precinct and various private businesses on June 26, 2020.

According to court documents, in the early morning hours of June 26, 2020, a group of demonstrators were present near the Portland Police Bureau’s North Precinct on NE Emerson Street in Portland. The precinct is located in a city-owned building containing multiple private businesses. Streeter-Hillerich was seen in video footage intentionally setting a large dumpster on fire near the building’s northwest exterior corner. The fire was set on top of the dumpster, which had been pushed up against plywood affixed to the building to protect windows and prevent break-ins. Officers used fire extinguishers to try and extinguish the fire before firefighters arrived.

The fire caused damage to the building and, were it allowed to spread, would have threatened the safety of 15 police personnel and four individuals in custody inside the building. Video evidence of the fire submitted by a private citizen led investigators to identify Streeter-Hillerich and bring charges in this case.

Streeter-Hillerich was arrested by the U.S. Marshals Service in Vancouver, Washington on September 15, 2020. He made his first appearance in federal court today before a U.S. Magistrate Judge and was ordered released pending further court proceedings. Arson is punishable by up to 20 years in prison with a mandatory minimum sentence of 5 years.

This case is being jointly investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives and the FBI with assistance from the U.S. Marshals Service. It is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

Criminal complaints are only accusations of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

To help identify actors who are actively instigating violence in the city of Portland, the FBI is accepting tips and digital media depicting violent encounters during demonstrations. If you have witnessed unlawful violent actions, we urge you to submit any information, photos, or videos that could be relevant to investigations at fbi.gov/PDviolence. You may also call 1-800-CALL-FBI (800-225-5324) to verbally report tips.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release , Photo , Photo , Photo , Photo

OHA Releases Updated Data on Certain Deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/16/20 2:49 PM

Sept. 16, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA Releases Updated Data on Certain Deaths

Today, Oregon Health Authority released updated data on certain deaths reported over the past several months. The updates are part of OHA’s data reconciliation and the details are listed below.

Each death related to COVID-19 is painful for all Oregonians and a reminder of the terrible impact of COVID-19. OHA extends its condolences and sympathies to family members, friends, relatives and colleagues of those who have died.


New information is available on Oregon’s 128th COVID-19 death, reported May 11, a 91-year-old man in Polk County, who tested positive on May 2 and died on May 10, at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 170th COVID-19 death, reported June 11, an 84-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on June 6 and died on June 9 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 183rd COVID-19 death, reported June 17, a 95-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on June 4 and died on June 11 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 184th COVID-19 death, reported June 18, an 82-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on June 4 and died on June 14 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 186th COVID-19 death, reported June 18, an 89-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on June 6 and died on June 16 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 187th COVID-19 death reported June 18, an 87-year-old man in Clackamas County who became symptomatic on May 13, after close contact with a confirmed case, and died on May 23 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 194th COVID-19 death, reported June 24, a 78-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on June 16 and died on June 22 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 202nd COVID-19 death, reported June 27, an 84-year-old man in Multnomah County who became symptomatic on June 21, after close contact with a confirmed case, and died on June 22 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 208th COVID-19 death, reported July 1, a 91-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on June 18 and died on June 29 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 209th COVID-19 death, reported July 2, a 73-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on June 20 and died on June 30 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 226th COVID-19 death, reported July 9, an 83-year-old man in Umatilla who tested positive on July 4 and died on July 3 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 232nd COVID-19 death, reported July 10, a 99-year-old woman in Lincoln County who tested positive on June 26 and died on July 9 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 233rd COVID-19 death, reported July 12, an 86-year-old woman in Malheur County, who tested positive on June 29. She died on July 9, at St. Luke’s Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 234th COVID-19 death, reported July 9, a 93-year-old woman in Washington County who died on July 7 and tested positive on July 11 in her residence. She did not have underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 244th COVID-19 death, reported July 14, a 95-year-old woman in Lincoln County who tested positive on June 29and died on July 13 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 255th COVID-19 death, reported July 18, a 78-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on July 14 and died on July 17 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 264th COVID-19 death, reported July 21, an 88-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on June 28 and died on July 19. She died at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 268th COVID-19 death, reported July 21, an 87-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on June 23 and died on July 20. He died at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 270th COVID-19 death, reported July 22, a 77-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 9 and died on July 20 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 271st COVID-19 death, reported July 22, an 82-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 16 and died on July 21 at Good Shepherd Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 276th COVID-19 death, reported July 24, a 92-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on July 12 and died on July 18 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 280th COVID-19 death, reported July 24, a 62-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 18 and died on July 18. She died at Adventist Health Portland. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 285th COVID-19 death, reported July 25, an 87-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 7 and died on July 17. He died at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 286th COVID-19 death, reported July 25, an 85-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 16 and died on July 24. He died in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 292nd COVID-19 death, reported July 28, a 77-year-old woman in Jefferson County who tested positive on June 30 and died on July 23 at St. Charles Medical Center in Bend. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 296th COVID-19 death, reported July 28, a 91-year-old woman in Clackamas County who became symptomatic on July 22, after close contact with a confirmed case, and died on July 26. She died in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 299th COVID-19 death, reported July 28, a 64-year-old woman in Jefferson County who tested positive on July 14 and died on July 27. She died at St. Charles Medical Center in Bend. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 300th COVID-19 death, reported July 28, an 82-year-old woman in Jefferson County who tested positive on July 20 and died on July 26. She died at St. Charles Medical Center in Bend. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 302nd COVID-19 death, reported July 28, a 66-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on July 14 and died on July 24. She died in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 303rd death, reported July 28, an 84-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 22 and died on July 25. She died in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 308th COVID-19 death, reported July 29, an 85-year-old woman in Morrow County who tested positive on July 10 and died on July 21. She died at Kadlec Regional Medical Center in Richland, Washington. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 311th COVID-19 death, reported July 29, a 73-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on June 21 and died on July 19. She died at Kadlec Regional Medical Center in Richland, Washington. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 317th COVID-19 death, reported July 31, a 90-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on July 12 and died on July 28, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 322nd COVID-19 death, reported July 28, an 81-year-old man in Lincoln County who tested positive on June 23, and died on July 29. He died in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 325th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 1, a 91-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on July 12 and died on July 28. She died in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 327th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 3, a 71-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on July 6 and died on Aug. 1. He died at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 328th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 1, a 50-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 20 and died on July 29, at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 333rd COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 4, a 96-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on July 27 and died on Aug. 2. at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 334th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 5, an 87-year-old woman in Clackamas County tested positive on July 8, and died on Aug. 1 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 336th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 5, a 74-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 12 and died on Aug. 1 at St. Anthony Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 340th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 7, a 90-year-old man in Clackamas County, who tested positive on July 30 and died on Aug. 5 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 341st COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 7, an 80-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on July 20 and died on July 31 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 348th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 7, a 93-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on July 28, and died on Aug. 6. She died at Willamette Valley Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 353rd COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 8, an 80-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on July 23 and died on Aug. 7 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 354th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 8, an 85-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug.6 and died on Aug. 7 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 355th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 8, a 41-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Aug. 4 and died on Aug. 5 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 370th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 12, a 95-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on Aug. 6 and died on Aug. 8 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 374th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 12 a 57-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on July 17 and died on Aug. 9 at Legacy Good Samaritan. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 378th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 13, an 80-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Aug. 2 and died on Aug. 9 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 381st COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 13, a 55-year-old man in Columbia County who tested positive on Aug. 7 and died on Aug. 9 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 394th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 18, a 97-year-old woman in Lincoln County who tested positive on Aug. 2 and died on Aug. 15 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 395th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 18, a 90-year-old man in Lincoln County who tested positive on Aug. 2 and died on Aug. 14 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 412th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 20, a 60-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on July 11 and died on Aug. 19 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 431st COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 26, an 82-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 25 and died on Aug. 21 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 432nd COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 26, a 55-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on May 11 and died on Aug.15 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 440th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 28, a 50-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on June 4 and died on Aug. 23 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 441st COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 28, a 73-year-old male in Umatilla County who tested positive on Aug. 9 and died on Aug. 23 at Kadlec Regional Medical Center in Richland, Washington. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 444th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 28, a 73-year-old woman in Malheur County who died on Aug. 1. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She died at St. Alphonsus Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 455th COVID-19 death, reported Aug. 30 a 70-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 9 and died on Aug. 29 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She did not have underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 462nd COVID-19 death, reported Sept. 1, a 66-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 31 and died on Aug. 28 at Good Shepherd Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 467th COVID-19 death, reported Sept. 2, a 73-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 14 and died on Aug. 29 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 478th COVID-19 death, reported Sept. 5, a 68-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on June 21 and died on July 16 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 485th COVID-19 death, reported Sept. 8, a 72-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died Sept. 6 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 493rd COVID-19 death, reported Sept. 9, an 88-year-old man in Morrow County who tested positive on Aug. 7 and died on Sept. 4 at Good Shepherd Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 502nd COVID-19 death, reported Sept. 12, a 97-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on June 29 and died on Aug. 29 at Legacy Meridian Park Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

New information is available on Oregon’s 507th COVID-19 death, reported Sept. 13, a 76-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 12 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.


Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery Update - Sept. 16, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/16/20 2:08 PM
Lionshead Fire Photo
Lionshead Fire Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138132/thumb_12800-112.JPG

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us.




Attached Media Files: Lionshead Fire Photo , September 15, 2020. Silverton, Oregon. Terri Vasche of the Silverton Creek Fellowship working in partnership with the American Red Cross writes words of support on sifters. These sifters will be used to salvage items remaining at burned homes in the Silve

Oregon Granted Major Disaster Declaration for September Wildfires
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/16/20 1:20 PM

Following an expedited request to President Trump by Oregon Governor Kate Brown on Monday, Oregon was notified within 24 hours that federal emergency aid has been made available to the state to supplement state, tribal and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by wildfires and straight-line winds beginning on Sept. 7, 2020 and continuing. 

“Oregon is resilient, but to fight fires on this scale, we need all the help we can get,” said Governor Kate Brown. “I am grateful for the White House’s swift response in quickly granting a Presidential Disaster Declaration and the immediate implementation of FEMA’s individual assistance program, which will help bring additional relief to Oregonians impacted by the devastation of these fires.”

The declaration makes federal funding available to affected individuals in Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn and Marion counties. Assistance can include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the disaster.

Individuals and business owners who sustained losses in the designated area can begin applying for assistance by registering online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling 1-800-621-3362 or 1-800-462-7585 TTY. Affected Oregonians are encouraged to apply as soon as possible.

Federal assistance through FEMA’s Public Assistance program is available to Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Coos, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington and Yamhill counties.

“Our office will be working hand-in-hand with FEMA over the coming weeks to ensure that Oregonians know how to apply for assistance,” said OEM Director Andrew Phelps. “This is an important step toward rebuilding the strength of our communities.”
 


Oregon reports 195 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/16/20 12:43 PM

Sept. 16, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 195 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 521, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 195 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 29,850.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (10), Clatsop (2), Coos (2), Deschutes (4), Douglas (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (15), Jefferson (5), Klamath (14), Lane (15), Linn (1), Malheur (17), Marion (23), Multnomah (32), Polk (3), Umatilla (2), Union (1), Wallowa (6), Wasco (2), Washington (33) and Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 520th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on July 9 and died on Sept. 8 at OHSU. He did not have underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 521st COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 4 and died on Sept. 10 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.


OHA announces new COVID-19 wastewater monitoring project

OHA today announced it had launched a statewide COVID-19 wastewater monitoring project to study the presence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in more than 40 small- to medium-sized communities around the state. The project, which will include weekly wastewater testing over the next 30 months, will enable epidemiologists to better understand the circulation of COVID-19 in some of Oregon’s communities. It will serve as an “early warning” system to tell if COVID-19 is spreading silently in communities.

“This program holds promise to help us monitor COVID-19 in our communities,” said Melissa Sutton MD, MPH, Medical Director for Respiratory Viral Pathogens at OHA and a principal investigator for the wastewater study. “We look forward to our partnership with local communities and researchers. Together we hope to better understand the spread of COVID-19 in Oregon.”

Much of the work will be carried out by Oregon State University researchers, along with local partners. Funding for this program comes from the CDC.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee meeting on September 18 has been canceled
Oregon Health Authority - 09/16/20 11:35 AM
Sept. 16, 2020: The Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee meeting on Friday Sept. 18. has been canceled because of wildfires and Committee member availability. The agenda below will be covered at the Committee’s next scheduled meeting on Oct. 6.

Contact: Sarah Bartelmann, 971-283-8107, ah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation).

What: A public meeting of the Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee.

When: Sept. 18, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: By Zoom or conference line.

Join by Zoom at https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1609458049?pwd=aVpLMkhaZFBlS0Rnb0NGaVRWTjVQUT09, meeting ID 160 945 8049, passcode 298032.

One tap mobile: +16692545252,,1609458049#,,,,,,0#,,298032

Agenda: Welcome; agenda review; public comment (9:15 a.m.); steps to increase VBP adoption; criteria for reporting payer and provider performance; Quality and Equity Workstream; next steps.

Please submit public comment in writing before the meeting at e.CostTarget@dhsoha.state.or.us">HealthCare.CostTarget@dhsoha.state.or.us.

For more information, please visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP/Pages/Sustainable-Health-Care-Cost-Growth-Target.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Bartelmann at 971-283-8107, 711 TTY, ah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


UPDATE WITH PHOTOS: Missing child alert - Missing foster child Mataya Gearhart is believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/16/20 10:52 AM
Third photo of missing child Mataya Gearhart
Third photo of missing child Mataya Gearhart
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/973/138120/thumb_Mataya_Gearhart_3.jpg

(Salem, Ore.) – Mataya Gearhart, age 16, is a foster child who went missing from Portland, Ore. on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. She is believed to be in danger.

The Oregon Department of Human Services asks the public to help in the effort to find her and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see her.

Name: Mataya Gearhart
Date of birth: Nov. 7, 2003
Height: 5’06
Weight: 180 pounds
Portland Police Bureau Case #20-276660
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1400569

Mataya Gearhart was last seen Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020 in Portland, Ore. 

Anyone who suspects they have information about Mataya Gearhart’s location should call 911 or local law enforcement.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As DHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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Attached Media Files: Third photo of missing child Mataya Gearhart , Second photo of missing child Mataya Gearhart , A photo of missing child Mataya Gearhart

Oregon OSHA faults 2 employers for similar failures to protect workers against COVID-19 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/16/20 9:28 AM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1073/138117/thumb_OSHA_Logo_-_RGB_Green.jpg

Salem – Oregon OSHA has issued more than $23,000 in fines to two different businesses for engaging in the same hazardous behavior: refusing to carry out proven steps to help protect workers from the coronavirus disease.

In separate enforcement actions, the division issued citations to Café 22 West in Salem and Howard’s Pharmacy in Lakeview.

The citations resulted from complaint-based inspections. After attempting unsuccessfully to resolve the issues raised in multiple complaints without an enforcement visit, Oregon OSHA initiated worksite inspections. The inspections found both employers willfully failing to implement health hazard control measures – such as face coverings and physical distancing – and continuing to operate in hazardous conditions, despite having been put on notice well before the inspection itself began.

Both cases illustrate failures to account for reasonable and established measures to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 through employee-to-employee or customer-to-employee transmission.

“In addressing complaints involving COVID-19 and the workplace, we have started with efforts to engage and educate the employers involved about what they needed to do. In most cases, we have been able to resolve any issues without an actual enforcement visit,” said Michael Wood, administrator for Oregon OSHA. “But as these two particular cases demonstrate, we will continue to bring our enforcement tools to bear when employers choose to disregard requirements.”

Here is a summary of each of the division’s enforcement actions:

Café 22 West – citation issued Aug. 18

This inspection concerned activities at a restaurant and retail fruit store.

It found the employer refused to furnish control measures to help protect about 18 employees from potential exposure to COVID-19. The employees’ jobs included hosting, cooking, cleaning, and serving customers.

The control measures that could have been provided – but were not – included implementing physical distancing and ensuring employees and customers wear face coverings.

Because of the employer’s refusal to comply, Oregon OSHA posted a Red Warning Notice at the business. Such a notice makes it clear a workplace is unsafe and should not continue operating until corrections are made.

Still, the employer refused to change course.

Altogether, Oregon OSHA is proposing a total fine of $13,900. That includes an $8,900 penalty for a willful violation of the requirement to provide health hazard controls and a $5,000 penalty for failing to abide by the Red Warning Notice. 

Howard’s Pharmacy – citation issued Sept. 1

This inspection included an examination of worker and customer interactions involving the indoor and outdoor spaces of a pharmacy and retail business.

It found the employer refusing to provide health hazard control measures to help protect an estimated nine employees from potential exposure to COVID-19. The employees were working inside and outside of the establishment.

The control measures that could have been provided – but were not – included implementing physical distancing and ensuring employees and customers wear face coverings.

In this case, too, after working with the employer for a week, Oregon OSHA posted a Red Warning Notice at the business because of its refusal to comply.  

Altogether, the division is proposing a total fine of $9,400. That includes an $8,900 penalty for a willful violation of the requirement to provide health hazard controls. It also includes a $500 penalty for continuing to operate in violation of the Red Warning Notice provisions.

The smaller penalty for the Red Warning Notice violation reflects the employer’s partial attempt to comply by moving operations curbside, although it still had not instituted face coverings when six feet of separation could not be consistently maintained between customers and employees or between employees.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers and workers a variety of consultation, information, and education resources addressing COVID-19.

COVID-19 citations – a summary

Since March, Oregon OSHA has issued 18 citations to employers for violating requirements to protect workers from COVID-19. Penalties for non-willful violations ranged from $100 to $2,000, while penalties for willful violations ranged from $8,900 to $14,000. The following summary is not an exhaustive list, as more citations are pending:

Unger Farms Inc. – Cornelius – did not provide one handwashing facility per 10 employees per the temporary emergency rule in agriculture.

Dillon & Associates (dba NW Office Liquidations) – Portland – furniture store was not closed to the public per executive order.

S&J Entertainment LLC – Portland – adult entertainment club was not closed to the public per executive order.

National Frozen Foods Corporation – Albany – did not provide health hazard controls such as physical distancing.

Old Trapper Smoked Products Inc. – Forest Grove – did not provide health hazard controls, including physical distancing; face coverings; or barriers.

Cabela’s Wholesale LLC – Springfield – did not provide health hazard controls such as physical distancing.

City Liquidators Inc. – Portland – furniture store was not closed to the public per executive order.

Barenbrug USA Inc. – Tangent – did not provide health hazard controls such as physical distancing.

Masterbrand Cabinets – Grants Pass – forest products manufacturer did not provide health hazard controls, including physical distancing and face coverings.

Glamour Salon – Salem – willfully failed to follow executive order prohibiting operation of barber shops and hair salons.

Mounts Enterprises (dba Casey’s Restaurant) – Roseburg – willfully failed to follow prohibition of on-premises consumption of food or drink.

Dalin LLP – North Bend – restaurant willfully failed to follow prohibition of on-premises consumption of food or drink.

I&N Inc. – Veneta – gas station and minimart did not use health hazard control measures such as physical distancing and face coverings.

Laui Life Coffee LLC (dba Kevista Coffee) – Bend – willfully failed to implement face coverings per sector-specific guidance for bars and restaurants.

Gold Standard Investment Group LLC – Central Point – did not follow requirements of the temporary emergency rule in agriculture, including adjacent toilet and handwashing facilities; sanitation schedule; and field sanitation information for workers.

Kelli Bieber – Central Point – did not follow requirements of the temporary emergency rule in agriculture, including adjacent toilet and handwashing facilities; sanitation schedule; and field sanitation information for workers.

Cal Farms Inc. – Oregon City – did not follow the requirement of the temporary emergency rule in agriculture to provide field sanitation information for workers.

Oregon Berry Packing Inc. – Hillsboro – did not follow the requirement of the temporary emergency rule in agriculture to provide field sanitation information for workers.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Bureau of Land Management to begin South Steens Herd Management Area wild horse gather
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/16/20 9:26 AM

Hines, Ore. – On September 21, 2020, the Bureau of Land Management plans to begin a wild horse gather by helicopter on private property within and outside of the South Steens Herd Management Area (HMA) in Harney County, located about six miles south of the small town of Frenchglen, Oregon. The HMA contains approximately 134,000 acres of BLM-administered and private land and is bordered by Hwy 205 to the west and the Blitzen River and Steens Mountain to the east. The appropriate management level for the South Steens HMA is 159-304 wild horses. The current population estimate for this herd is 979 adults and 200 foals.

The objective of this gather is to capture and remove approximately 200 wild horses which have strayed onto private property within and outside the southern HMA boundary. The gather is expected to take approximately five days and operations will be limited to these specific areas. Daily reports will be posted online at www.blm.gov/programs/wild-horse-and-burro under “ongoing gathers” and “Oregon”.

All gather activities and temporary holding facilities will be on private land. There will be no public viewing opportunities until horses arrive at Oregon’s Wild Horse Corral Facility in Hines, where the horses will be checked by a veterinarian and readied for the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Adoption and Sale Program.

The BLM’s top gather priority remains to conduct a safe, efficient, and successful operation while ensuring humane care and treatment of all animals gathered. The BLM and its contractors will use the safest and most humane handling practices for wild horses while meeting overall gather goals and objectives following the Comprehensive Animal Welfare Policy.

For information on how to adopt or purchase a wild horse or burro, visit www.blm.gov/whb.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.


Recreational use advisory issued for Moore Park and the surrounding area on Upper Klamath Lake Sept. 16
Oregon Health Authority - 09/16/20 9:05 AM

Sept. 16, 2020

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Recreational use advisory issued for Moore Park and the surrounding area on Upper Klamath Lake Sept. 16

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for Moore Park and closely surrounding areas on Upper Klamath Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacterial bloom and cyanotoxins above recreational use values for human exposure. Moore Park is located at the southern end of Upper Klamath Lake in Klamath County.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash.

People are encouraged to visit Upper Klamath Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

People who are not on a well or a public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because not all private treatment systems are proven effective in removing cyanotoxins.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to a lake with areas affected by a bloom for recreation activities, regardless of whether a recreational use health advisory is in place, should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in these areas. Dogs can also be exposed to cyanotoxins when present by licking their fur, licking cyanobacteria off rocks or eating cells from a bloom.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacterial blooms are present should have fat, skin and organs removed before cooking or freezing, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and result in a range of symptoms, from those similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, to more serious symptoms like numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath that may require medical attention.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.


Tue. 09/15/20
I-84 EASTBOUND now open in Baker City (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 09/15/20 9:01 PM
Vehicle fire near I-84 milepost 324
Vehicle fire near I-84 milepost 324
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1204/138106/thumb_03FD1552-6B1B-4570-BB5B-CC2D57692843.jpeg

I-84 EB is now open between Exit 302 in Baker City and MP 329. The freeway was closed earlier due to a vehicle fire that is now under control. Please watch for crews that may still be in the area and be prepared for possible lane restrictions. The westbound lanes we not impacted. Check TripCheck.com, or call 511 / 800-977-6368 for update conditions. Outside Oregon call 503-588-2941.




Attached Media Files: Vehicle fire near I-84 milepost 324

Pacific Power continues making progress restoring power to hard-hit areas in region
Pacific Power - 09/15/20 6:00 PM

Media hotline: 503-813-6018

NOTE TO MEDIA: Images of restoration work underway are available for use, via this link. Photo credit: Pacific Power

 

Pacific Power continues making progress restoring power to hard-hit areas in region

Weather improvements allow crews to access more areas to assess and repair

PORTLAND, Ore. (Sept. 15, 2020) — Electric service is coming back on for customers across the region as more than 500 Pacific Power employees and contractors are at work repairing equipment and jump- starting community recovery from Lincoln City to Glide to Happy Camp.

As of 6 p.m. Tuesday, approximately 5,500 customers remain without service in Oregon and northern California due to damage inflicted by a historic wind storm. At peak a week ago, more than 60,000 were without power. Most recently, power was restored to 800 customers in Lincoln City.

“This has been a tremendously trying week for all our customers affected by this unparalleled disaster,” said David Lucas, vice president of operations. “Our communities are showing such resilience and their appreciation for the frontline responders and our crews is a terrific statement about the people we are privileged to serve.”

Communities with the largest number of customers without power include:

 

  • Medford area, 3,100 customers
  • Happy Camp, Calif., 300
  • Lincoln City, 700
  • Glide/Umpqua Canyon, 500

 

Pacific Power’s website will provide up-to-date estimates of local restorations times at www.pacificpower.net/outage-updates. This page will be updated as new information becomes available. Additional outage maps are available at: www.pacificpower.net/outages-safety.

Community spirit

Pacific Power employees are rolling up their sleeves wherever they can, supporting the communities they serve.

  • North Umpqua – Pacific Power helped clear trees and powerlines that had blocked access to the Rock Creek Fish Hatchery east of Glide. With the road cleared, hatchery employees were able to rescue thousands of fish that would have died.
  • Marion County – The company has donated $12,500 to the Santiam Canyon Relief Fund, which was set up by local business leaders to provide direct help to people needing help in the storm’s aftermath.
     
  • Southern Oregon – Regional Business managers have delivered more than 1,000 meals to residents who are staying in Jackson County shelters.

How to be ready, how to get help

Pacific Power customer care agents are available and ready to help customers through this incredibly difficult time. They can be reached 24/7 at 1-888-221-7070. 

The company is working with the Red Cross and local agencies to directly aid people in need. Support is available for those in wildfire-affected areas at the following community shelter locations:

Oregon:

  • Josephine County Fairgrounds – 1451 Fairgrounds Rd, Grants Pass
  • Jackson County Expo – 1 Peninger Rd, Central Point
  • Oregon State Fairgrounds – 2330 17th St. NE, Salem
  • Klamath County Fair Grounds – 3531 S 6th St, Klamath Falls
  • Kla-Mo-Ya Casino – 34333 US-97, Chiloquin
  • Lincoln City Community Center--2150 NE Oar Place
  • Linn County Fairgrounds – 3700 Knox Butte Rd E, Albany
  • Benton County Fairgrounds – 110 SW 53rd St, Corvallis
  • Deschutes County Fairgrounds – 3800 SW Airport Way, Redmond
  • Douglas County Fairgrounds – 2110 Frear St., Roseburg
  • Polk County Fairgrounds – 520 S Pacific Hwy W, Rickreall 

Northern California:

  • Kahtishraam Wellness Center – 1403 Kahtishraam, Yreka
  • Siskiyou County Fairgrounds (taking large animals) – 1712 Fairlane Rd, Yrek

 

###


Revenue closing offices to the public due to wildfires, air quality
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 09/15/20 4:04 PM

Salem, OR—The Oregon Department of Revenue is making temporary changes to protect the public in response to the threat of wildfires and poor air quality.

Beginning Wednesday, September 16, the Revenue Building in Salem and all regional field offices will be closed to the general public for in-person payments and taxpayer assistance by appointment.

The department plans to reopen to the public on Monday, September 21 and will accept appointments for taxpayer assistance and in-person payments at that time.

Until then, taxpayers in need of assistance can reach the department by telephone at 503-378-4988 or toll free at 800-356-4222, or through email at questions.dor@oregon.gov.

We encourage taxpayers to use our online resources at www.oregon.gov/dor whenever possible to obtain tax forms, calculate your kicker amount, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments using Revenue Online.

The public can also keep up to date with the latest developments and news on the impacts of wildfires in Oregon by visiting www.wildfire.oregon.gov.
 


And our flag was still there: Nation's colors prove resilient at Bureau of Land Management recreation site (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/15/20 3:50 PM
Bureau of Land Management photo.
Bureau of Land Management photo.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5514/138093/thumb_American_Flag_After_Fire_PR.jpg

Marion County, Ore. – On September 7, multiple fires along Highway 22 swept through the Fishermen’s Bend Recreation Site, destroying much of the popular BLM-managed campground.

Upon visiting the site, an American flag that had not been lowered upon evacuation was found proudly flying over the charred ground.

The much-loved Fishermen’s Bend Recreation Site just 30 minutes east of Salem featured dozens of campsites, well-groomed hiking trails, and tremendous river access, including a boat ramp, in the Cascade foothills.

Apart from the flag, “very little else remains at the recreation site,” according to Northwest District Manager Jose Linares.

To see more images of the remains of the Fishermen's Bend Recreation Site, visit BLM-OR/WA's Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search/?user_id=50169152%40N06&view_all=1&text=Fire%20destroys%20Fishermen%27s%20Bend%20Recreation%20Site

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.




Attached Media Files: Bureau of Land Management photo.

Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery Update - Sept. 15, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/15/20 3:00 PM
Firefighters on the scene at OR 22 east of Salem to Detroit
Firefighters on the scene at OR 22 east of Salem to Detroit
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The Oregon Office of Emergency Management posted today's Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See the Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery Update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us.




Attached Media Files: Firefighters on the scene at OR 22 east of Salem to Detroit , A bike pat on OR 22 east of Salem to Detroit

Yakima School District Free Meal Distribution Times Shortened for Sept 16 Due to Poor Air Quality (Photo)
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 09/15/20 12:34 PM
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On Wednesday, September 16, the hours for the Yakima School District's meal pick up will be shortened due to poor air quality. We will distribute meals from 11:00 am to 12:00pm and from 5:30pm – 6:30pm. Meals are free for all children age 1-18. If picking up for a YSD student, please bring their student ID card. Schools that will be open on Wednesday for meal pick up are:

Adams

Barge-Lincoln

Garfield

Hoover

MLK Jr.

McClure

Ridgeview

Robertson

Discovery Lab

Washington

Lewis & Clark

Franklin

IKE

Davis

Yakima Online and Open Doors will distribute meals from 11AM - 12PM only.

Families picking up food must wear a face covering. For more details, please go to our district website at www.YSD7.org




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3536/138082/FB_Meal_Distribution_Shortened_Hours_-_Spanish.png , 2020-09/3536/138082/FB_Meal_Distribution_Shortened_Hours_-_ENGLISH.png

Oregon reports 184 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/15/20 12:24 PM

September 15, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 184 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed eight more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 519, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 184 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 29,662.

The new cases are in the following counties: Clackamas (11), Clatsop (1), Columbia (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (2), Douglas (1), Gilliam (2), Jackson (10), Jefferson (3), Josephine (2), Klamath (3), Lane (9), Linn (6), Malheur (25), Marion (31), Morrow (3), Multnomah (35), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (4), Union (1), Washington (25), and Yamhill (5).

Oregon’s 512th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Washington County who died on Sept. 1, at Tuality Healthcare. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death.

Oregon’s 513th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 11, at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Idaho. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 514th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 30 and died on Sept. 14, at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 515th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Morrow County who tested positive on Aug.11 and died on Sept. 13, at OHSU. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 516th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on July 31 and died on Sept. 9, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 517th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 25 and died on Sept. 11, at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 518th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept. 11, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 519th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept.10, at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

TESTING NOTE: Wildfires and hazardous air conditions have affected COVID-19 testing in Oregon. The Oregon State Public Health Laboratory (OSPHL) is closed again today, Tuesday, Sept. 15 due to indoor air safety issues.

Most specimens that the OSPHL cannot process are being re-routed to commercial laboratories. As such OHA does not anticipate a large backlog of tests due to OSPHL’s closure.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 09/15/20 12:00 PM

WHO:              David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department

WHEN:            Wed., Sept. 16, 2020 at 1:00 p.m. PT

WHAT:            Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on unemployment claims processing on Wed. Sept. 16 at 1:00 p.m. PT. Gerstenfeld will provide an update on claims processing, including an update on how the Oregon wildfires may impact unemployment benefits.

WHERE:         Via Zoom video conference; Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12:00 p.m. PT on Wed., Sept. 16. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:          The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for week day updates. A recording of the video conference will be sent out shortly after the media briefing concludes.

###

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/930/138069/9.16_Media_availability_FINAL.pdf

State Fire Marshal Sends Resources to Paisley as Brattain Fire Threatens Community
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 09/15/20 10:27 AM

Gov. Kate Brown has declared a Conflagration to address changing conditions as the Brattain Fire threatens Paisley, in Lake County.

The Brattain Fire in Lake County is currently threatening lives, structures and property as it moves closer to Paisley. Forecasters yesterday had issued a Red Flag Warning for strong, gusty winds and low relative humidity.

The Office of State Marshal mobilized three task forces, who are at the incident today. Two task forces were sent from Oregon structural fire agencies and one task force was deployed from Idaho, following the state’s request for out-of-state resources through the state’s Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC). Those resources joined existing local, state and federal resources currently at the incident.

Prior to last night’s declaration, Gov. Brown had made a statewide Conflagration Act declaration, and Oregon structural fire service resources from more than 100 agencies have been mobilized to 11 conflagrations statewide in a week.

For the past two days, weather systems have allowed some crews in Oregon’s fire service to begin pulling off of current deployments, while additional resources have arrived and are being mobilized from Utah, North Dakota, Minnesota, Washington and Idaho.

Calls for assistance from impacted fire districts continue to be managed through the Oregon Fire Mutual Aid System.

Additional updates for the incident may be accessed on the Oregon State Fire Marshal Facebook page: www.facebook.com/OregonStateFireMarshal/.

To learn more about wildfire evacuation readiness go to: www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/sfm/Pages/Wildland-Urban-Interface.aspx#evacuation.


Oregon's Unemployment Rate Drops to 7.7 Percent in August
Oregon Employment Department - 09/15/20 10:00 AM

Wildfires Impact

Devastating wildfires have ravaged workplaces, homes, communities, and more than 1 million acres of land across Oregon over the past several days. This release covers the Oregon employment situation in August. It does not capture the personal and economic disruption caused by these disasters.

Oregon’s unemployment rate dropped to 7.7 percent in August from 10.4 percent in July. The unemployment rate was more than double last year’s rate of 3.6 percent in August 2019. Meanwhile, the U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 8.4 percent in August from 10.2 percent in July.

Oregon’s total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 11,300 jobs in August, following a revised gain of 17,700 jobs in July. Over the past four months, employers added back 41 percent of the jobs that were cut in March and April.

Over-the-month job gains in August were largest in leisure and hospitality (+4,200 jobs); retail trade (+3,300); construction (+3,200); and government (+3,000). Two industries cut a substantial number of jobs in August: wholesale trade (-1,400 jobs) and health care and social assistance (-1,400).

Leisure and hospitality—which includes restaurants, drinking establishments, hotels, and recreational industries—has added back the most jobs of any of the major industries over the past four months. Despite adding 63,200 jobs during the past four months, leisure and hospitality is only a little over halfway back to its February 2020 peak employment level, prior to the economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Retail trade has bounced back closer to its recent peak employment level. It added 16,100 jobs over the past four months, which was nearly three-quarters of the jobs lost earlier in the year. The third industry to add back more than half of its jobs lost, while also rebounding by more than 10,000 jobs, was health care and social assistance. This industry, despite a 1,400-job loss in August, added 18,000 jobs over the past four months, regaining nearly two-thirds of its March and April job losses.

Not all industries have rebounded with substantial job growth over the past four months. In August, the following industries remained near their low point for the year: manufacturing; government; information; and professional and business services.

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the August county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, September 22nd, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for September on Tuesday, October 13th.

###

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/930/138067/employment_in_Oregon_--_August_2020_--_press_release.pdf

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Disaster Fraud (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/15/20 10:00 AM
2020-09/3585/137918/TT_-_Disaster_Fraud_-_GRAPHIC_-_September_15_2020.png
2020-09/3585/137918/TT_-_Disaster_Fraud_-_GRAPHIC_-_September_15_2020.png
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against charity fraud. 

It’s likely you know a friend or family member who had to evacuate their home… maybe even someone who has lost their home in the devastating wildfires we have seen in Oregon in recent days. Social media feeds and the news are filled with heartbreaking images of entire towns wiped out and people struggling to get by. It is a time for our community to come together to help our neighbors. 

As you consider how you want to help or to which organizations you want to donate, though, we just want you to be careful. For obvious reasons, charity scams spike after significant events like these fires.

Fraudsters prey on your feelings of helplessness. They create fake social media accounts and websites to make it easy for you to give. Just click the link, and you will feel like you’ve made a difference. Unfortunately, if you pick the wrong organization, those most in need will never see your donation.  

Along with the Federal Trade Commission, we offer these tips for safe giving: 

  • Donate to charities you know and trust. 

  • Designate the donation to go to a specific disaster relief effort as opposed to a general fund.  

  • Never click on links or open attachments in unsolicited e-mails, texts, or social media posts. 

  • Verify the legitimacy of any solicitation by contacting the organization directly through a trusted contact number. 

  • Do your research. Use the the Federal Trade Commission's resources to examine the track record of a charity. 

  • Beware of organizations with copycat names similar to, but not exactly the same as, those of reputable charities. 

  • Avoid charities that ask for you to pay by cash, gift card, virtual currency, or wire transfer.  

  • Pay by credit card or write a check directly to the charity. Do not make checks payable to individuals. 

  • Know that most legitimate charity websites end in .org rather than .com. 

  • Make contributions directly, rather than relying on others to make a contribution on your behalf. 

Those affected by the fires can use your help – and there are plenty of legitimate charities out there to do that work. You just need to do your research before giving. 

If you have been victimized by a charity fraud scam or any other online scam, be sure to file a report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.  

###




Attached Media Files: T - Disaster Fraud - AUDIO - September 15, 2020 , 2020-09/3585/137918/TT_-_Disaster_Fraud_-_GRAPHIC_-_September_15_2020.png

Melito Ramirez named 2020 Washington Classified School Employee of the Year (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 09/15/20 9:56 AM
2020-09/1288/138073/Melito_Ramirez.jpg
2020-09/1288/138073/Melito_Ramirez.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1288/138073/thumb_Melito_Ramirez.jpg

WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla High School Intervention Specialist Melito Ramirez has dedicated the past four decades working professionally to support students and families and was honored for his career being named the 2020 Washington Classified School Employee of the Year. 

2020 Washington Classified School Employee of the Year Melito Ramirez has spent the past 12 years as an Intervention Specialist for Walla Walla Public Schools. As a child Ramirez grew up in a migrant family traveling from Texas to California, Washington and other western states seeking agricultural employment.  He began his career in the College Place School District in 1980 working to improve communication and support to migrant families living in the area.  In his current role as an Intervention Specialist, Ramirez works with students facing social-emotional barriers, including depression, social and emotional concerns, substance addiction and poverty. He works to support these students by building relationships, keeping communication flowing between students, their family and their teachers, and providing support to students who need help working toward graduation.

“Melito models, through belief and action, our district’s core commitments around equity, access and engagement,” said Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith. “He is a mentor and role model for so many students, providing resources, support and encouragement. 

Ramirez says his love for the community and helping people is what fuels his passion.

“I didn’t get into this line of work to get recognition or to make millions of dollars,” said Ramirez. “I get my inspiration by working with students and helping them realize their dreams. It’s satisfying seeing so many school district staff who I supported as they were growing up being successful in their careers and raising their own families.”

One of his former students is Marilyn Melgoza who was recently named Wa-Hi ASB Advisor and also works in the Equity and Dual Programs Department as an outreach specialist.  

“Melito constantly reminded me the work we do is for our people and our communities,” said Melgoza. “He always encouraged me to be my authentic self, share my truth, share my story, and be a voice for others. The way students and families talk about the trust they have in Melito is powerful, it is inspiring, and it must be recognized!”

Ramirez is a gifted communicator who has a natural ability to identify and close gaps in his community. He specializes in working with migrant families with backgrounds similar to his own. He maintains a leadership position in an adult evening school that helps adults improve their English skills, learn first aid, gain citizenship and develop viticulture skills. He also gives back to the community by serving on the College Place School District Board of Directors. 

“It is safe to say that Melito’s influence has been instrumental in our district’s ability to close the graduation and dropout gap for Latino students,” said Superintendent Smith. “I cannot think of anyone more deserving of this incredible recognition.”

Ramirez will continue on to the national competition being the first Washington Classified School Employee of the Year to compete for the Recognizing Inspirational School Employees (RISE) award, administered by the U.S. Department of Education.

###
 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1288/138073/Melito_Ramirez.jpg

Mon. 09/14/20
Pre-Season Training of Oregon National Guard for Wildland Firefighting Pays-Off (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 09/14/20 5:42 PM
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Thanks to requests by state leaders for federal funds allocated by members of Congress to provide training in advance of wildfire season, more than 300 members of the Oregon National Guard were trained in July by the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) as wildland firefighters. 

This training was pro-actively offered by DPSST at the request of Governor Brown and the Oregon National Guard so that our State's citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen could be activated and deployed much faster should the need arise for their assistance.  The current wildfires around the state show the importance of this pro-active training as three teams of Oregon National Guard members have been deployed to date.  DPSST has provided refresher training on the use of emergency fire shelters to those being deployed (photos attached).

The training offered at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem earlier this year is often known as "red card" training and consists of both classroom and hands-on sessions. The training provided is the same training required of all public and private wildland firefighters.

The Oregon National Guard has a proven track record of supporting wildfire suppression efforts, from the air and on the ground, around the state in recent years. In 2015, members of the Guard assisted with wildfire suppression efforts in John Day and Enterprise. In 2017, more than 400 citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen supported Oregon's firefighting efforts (air and ground) at High Cascades Complex (near Crater Lake), Chetco Bar, Blanket Creek, Horse Prairie, and Milli fires.

As part of the State's coordinated and comprehensive wildfire suppression efforts, the Guard has a long-standing agreement with the Oregon Department of Forestry known as Operation Plan Smokey, which stipulates the details of how Guard members will be utilized to assist in annual firefighting efforts if needed. This agreement is reviewed on an annual basis by both agencies and the Governor's Office.

DPSST is preparing to train more than 200 additional members of the Oregon National Guard later this week in case their assistance will also be needed.  This training will take a week and will be held at Camp Rilea in Warrenton due to air quality conditions at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem. Due to staffing needs created by wildfires around the state, DPSST is recieving assistance from instructors from the University of Illinois Fire Service Institute and the Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management.

DPSST Director Eriks Gabliks said "DPSST is honored to help support this important mission that has a proven record of success in training over 1,000 members of the Guard for wildland firefighting duties over the past five years. We value and appreciate the partnership we enjoy with the Oregon National Guard and the deployment of three teams of citizen-soldiers and citizen-soldiers on short notice shows the importance of the federal funds made available by Congress for the training our agency was able to provide."

For questions specific the Oregon Military Department Public Affairs Office by phone at 503-584-3917 or email at  AGPA@mil.state.or.us 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST, recognized as one of North America's most innovative state public safety standards and training organizations, provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1187/138059/ONG_September_9-14-2020.jpeg , Wildfire Shelter Training Oregon National Guard , Wildfire Shelter Training Oregon National Guard , Wildfire Shelter Training Oregon National Guard , Wildfire Shelter Training Oregon National Guard , Wildfire Shelter Training Oregon National Guard

OHA Releases Weekly Testing Summary
Oregon Health Authority - 09/14/20 5:06 PM

September 14, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA Releases Weekly Testing Summary

OHA’s most recent Weekly Testing Summary showed that as of Sept. 12, Oregon’s cumulative positivity rate is 4.6 percent of people tested. This is considerably lower than the national average of 8 percent. Of the 17,365 test results reported so far for the week of Sept. 6-12, 965 or 5.6 percent were positive. The total for that week is likely to rise as test results continue to be reported to OHA. Test positivity had been declining since a peak in late July; however, current results indicate a lower number of tests and a higher test positivity for the most recent week. OHA will continue to monitor the situation


Marion County Career Drug Trafficker Sentenced to 15 Years in Federal Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/14/20 4:32 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Marion County, Oregon man was sentenced to federal prison today for possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine and possession of a firearm as a convicted felon, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Mark William Osburn, 39, was sentenced to 180 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release by U.S. District Judge Karin Immergut.

According to court documents, on September 23, 2018, an Oregon state trooper stopped Osburn after observing him commit several traffic violations. Osburn gave the trooper a fraudulent Washington State driver’s license in another man’s name. A records check revealed that the other man had an Oregon concealed handgun license, proving that the license Osburn produced was a fake. Troopers searched Osburn’s car and found ten fentanyl pills, approximately 74 grams of methamphetamine, and a pistol.

In a separate incident in December 2018, Salem Police officers executed a search warrant at a local motel room after receiving information that Osburn and his girlfriend were selling drugs out of the room. Officers found and seized methamphetamine, user quantities of cocaine and heroin, digital scales, several firearms, ammunition, counterfeit currency, fake identification cards, and $2,300 in cash, among other items. Officers also found a shotgun in Osburn’s vehicle.

Osburn told investigators that he and his girlfriend had been living in the motel room for two months. He admitted to using and selling methamphetamine, and claimed to have sold up to a kilogram of methamphetamine in a 24-hour period. He further admitted to trading drugs for firearms.

Osburn was charged with two counts of possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine; two counts of felon in possession of a firearm; one count of possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; and one count each of possession of fentanyl, heroin, and cocaine. On February 8, 2020, Osburn pleaded guilty to possession with intent to distribute more than 50 grams of actual methamphetamine, and two counts of felon in possession of a firearm. Osburn has an extensive criminal history that includes six prior state convictions for delivering methamphetamine

This case was investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, the Oregon State Police, and the Salem Police Department. It was prosecuted by Gary Y. Sussman, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon Wildfires Response & Recovery Update - Sept. 14, 2020
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/14/20 4:27 PM

Situation Summary - Oregon Wildfires - Sept. 14, 2020

Fire crews continue to focus on protectonof lfe and property. Evacuation orders continue to change as fire activity and containment levels change; check wildfire.oregon.gov for the latest maps and evacuation levels. Air quality remains at hazardous levels down the I-5 corridor and the Columbia Gorge. Red Flag Wanings for high winds remain in effect in parts of Jackson, Lake and Klamath Counties.

For statistics, media resources and other key information, read the OEM Wildfire Response and Recovery Update  attached.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138047/OEM_DAILY_WILDFIRE_UPDATE_-_Sept._14_2020.PDF

State Fire Marshal Active in 11 Conflagrations Statewide
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 09/14/20 3:06 PM

On Sept. 7, an unprecedented wind event began across the Northwest in the early evening. Winds from the east gusted up to 50 mph across the state of Oregon, fanning the flames of existing large fires on the landscape. 

The Oregon Fire Mutual Aid System (OFMAS), made up by the Oregon structural fire service, worked nonstop, from the initial onset of fires beginning the evening of Sept. 7 and throughout the following days.

In accordance with ORS 476.510 - 476.610, Governor Kate Brown determined that threats to life, safety and property existed due to fire, and those threats exceeded the firefighting capabilities of local firefighting personnel and equipment. The Governor's statewide Conflagration Act declaration authorized the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal to mobilize resources to assist local resources battling the fire.

"We have structural firefighters from across the state working around the clock to save lives and homes," said State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple. “The Oregon Fire Mutual Aid system provided initial attack to fires throughout Oregon to provide basic life safety and structural protection with the primary focus of saving lives. The state’s mutual aid system has proven critical during this historic series of events.”

Eleven incidents were declared conflagrations over the past week, including a statewide Conflagration Act declaration, where the Oregon Fire Mutual Aid System was able to surge resources for assistance. The statistics provided below are current as of Sept. 12.

  1. Beachie Creek: Several communities in Marion, Linn and Clackamas Counties. 188,374 acres. 0 percent contained. 37,032 structures threatened.
  2. Holiday Farm: Along Hwy 126 west of McKenzie Bridge to Vida in Lane County. 161,872 acres. 5 percent contained. 23,556 structures threatened.
  3. Two Four Two: Chiloquin in Klamath County. 14,450 acres. 10 percent contained. 1,278 structures threatened.
  4. Almeda Drive: Ashland to Medford in Jackson County. 3,200 acres. 60 percent contained. 16,763 structures threatened.
  5. South Obenchain: Eagle Point and nearby communities in Jackson County. 25,000 acres. 20 percent contained. 4,175 structures threatened.
  6. Archie Creek: Steamboat Springs to Glide on Hwy 138 in Douglas County. 115,857 acres. 10 percent contained. 1,856 structures threatened.
  7. Slater: Happy Camp, CA north to O’Brien in Josephine County. 122,006 acres. 0 percent contained. 900 structures threatened.
  8. Riverside: Estacada, Molalla, Sandy and surrounding rural communities in Clackamas County.132,526 acres. 0 percent contained. 172,972 structures threatened.
  9. North Cascades Complex: Communities in rural Clackamas County. 2,060 acres, 0 percent contained, 65 structures.
  10. Lionshead: Marion and Jefferson Counties and Warm Springs Reservation. 138,718 acres. 5 percent contained. 340 structures threatened.
  11. PowerLine: Cherry Grove in Washington County. 126 acres. 100 structures threatened. OSFM has since disengaged from this incident.

###

Contacts:
Nikki Fisher, Press Secretary and Public Engagement Advisor
Office of Governor Kate Brown
Nikki.FISHER@oregon.gov
503.689.2509

Rudy Owens, Public Affairs Specialist
Office of State Fire Marshal
udy.Owens@osp.oregon.gov">Rudy.Owens@osp.oregon.gov
503.934.8217


Paid-leave program to help some employees who need to quarantine
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/14/20 2:58 PM

(Salem) – A new program starts this week to help people who work in Oregon and need to quarantine or isolate due to COVID-19 exposure, but do not have access to COVID-19-related paid sick leave, the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) announced today.

The COVID-19 Temporary Paid Leave Program was created with $30 million received from the federal government to help Oregon respond to the coronavirus pandemic.

People who qualify will receive a $120 per-day payment for up to 10 working days ($1,200 total) for the time they are required quarantine.

Employees can apply online starting Wednesday, Sept. 16, at oregon.gov/covidpaidleave.

The application form is available in English, Spanish, and Russian. Those who do not have access to electronic applications can call 833-685-0850 (toll-free) or 503-947-0130. Those who need help in a language other than these three can call 503-947-0131 for help.

DCBS and the Department of Revenue are collaborating on the new program to ensure employees meet the necessary eligibility requirements.

You must meet all of the following requirements to be eligible for the program:

  • Work in Oregon and required to file an Oregon personal income tax return.
  • Directed to quarantine by a local or tribal public health authority or health care provider because of exposure to someone infected, or isolating because you have COVID-19-related symptoms and are seeking a medical diagnosis.
  • Not able to work (including telework) because you need to quarantine or isolate.
  • Do not expect to earn more than $60,000 individually or $120,000 jointly in 2020.
  • Your employer does not provide COVID-19-related paid sick leave or you have exhausted your available COVID-19-related paid sick leave.
  • Are not applying for or receiving unemployment insurance benefits for the time off due to quarantine or isolation.
  • Are not applying for or receiving workers’ compensation claim benefits due to quarantine or isolation.
  • Are not seeking or using benefits from similar COVID-19 quarantine relief programs in Oregon or another state.
  • Are not applying for or receiving other forms of paid leave from your employer during your quarantine or isolation, such as banked sick leave or vacation leave.
  • Are not laid off or furloughed by your employer.
  • Must have notified your employer that you need to quarantine or isolate.

Because the available funds are limited, the program is available only to quarantine periods that were in place on or after Sept. 16. Applicants can claim only one quarantine period.

For more information or to apply, go to oregon.gov/covidpaidleave or call 833-685-0850 (toll-free) or 503-947-0130 between 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The website also contains an eligibility quiz to help people who are not sure if they qualify.

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About DCBS: The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS.


Nurse Staffing Advisory Board Process Improvement Committee meets September 23
Oregon Health Authority - 09/14/20 1:58 PM

September 14, 2020

What: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board Process Improvement Committee is holding its third meeting. This meeting was rescheduled from Sept. 9 in response to Oregon’s wildfires.

Agenda:

  • Review the committee agenda and summary from previous meeting.
  • Finalize recommendation on survey process priorities and Nurse Staffing Report format.
  • Review components of the nurse staffing complaint investigation process.
  • Discuss nurses’ concerns with the current complaint investigation process and role of NSAB and OHA in addressing these concerns.
  • Discuss communication to share with nurses regarding complaint investigation process.
  • Summarize action items and next steps.

The agenda will be available on www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

When: Sept. 23, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: ZoomGov meeting. Dial 669-254-5252 (Pacific Time Zone), meeting ID 160 633 1073, passcode 596248.

The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises the Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to OHA based on those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

Program contact: Kimberly Voelker, 971-673-0389, erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kimberly Voelker, MPH at 971-673-0389, 711 TTY or erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


142nd Wing deploys in support of OPLAN Smokey (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 09/14/20 1:38 PM
2020-09/962/138022/200914-Z-CM403-1002.jpg
2020-09/962/138022/200914-Z-CM403-1002.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/962/138022/thumb_200914-Z-CM403-1002.jpg

PORTLAND AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Ore. Members of the 142nd Wing are deploying in support of efforts to contain and mitigate multiple wildland fires raging across the state of Oregon.

50 Airmen will depart Portland Air National Guard Base, Ore. at 1400 today. They will be serving first in Medford, Ore., then dispersing to wherever they are needed.   

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About the 142nd Wing

The Portland Air National Guard Base employs 1,400 Airmen who provide an economic impact of nearly $130 million to the region. The 142nd Wing defends our homeland with F-15 Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian border, on 24-hour Aerospace Control Alert as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.

 

Photo captions:

1001: 142nd Wing members walk to their vehicles to stow their bags as they prepare to leave to help with the Oregon fires throughout the state. Sep. 14, 2020, Portland Air National Guard Base, Portland, Ore. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by TSgt Aaron Perkins 142nd Wing Public Affairs/Released)

1002: 142nd Mission Support Group commander, Col. Christopher Lantagne, talks to deploying 142nd members who are leaving to help with the Oregon fires, Sep. 14, 2020, Portland Air National Guard Base, Portland, Ore. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by TSgt Aaron Perkins 142nd Wing Public Affairs/Released)




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/962/138022/200914-Z-CM403-1002.jpg , 2020-09/962/138022/200914-Z-CM403-1001.jpg

Oregon reports 151 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/14/20 12:22 PM

September 14, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 151 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 511, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 151 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 29,484.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (18), Columbia (1), Coos (1), Deschutes (3), Douglas (3), Jackson (4), Jefferson (1), Klamath (1), Lane (19), Malheur (13), Marion (11), Morrow (2), Multnomah (27), Polk (1), Umatilla (23), Union (1), Wasco (1), Washington (18), and Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 510th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 13, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 511th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Aug. 20. More details about her death are pending. She had underlying conditions.

TESTING NOTE: Wildfires and hazardous air conditions have affected COVID-19 testing in Oregon. Over the past several days statewide testing numbers appear to have dipped. This is a lagging data point as tests are often reported several days after specimen collection. However, due to widespread hazardous conditions, people seeking testing may have declined. OHA will continue to monitor the situation.

The Oregon State Public Health Laboratory (OSPHL) is closed today Monday, Sept. 14, due to indoor air quality which is too hazardous to safely use appropriate air safety equipment including hoods. No specimens will be accepted or tested. Specimens already received at OSPHL are being held at appropriate temperatures pending testing. OSPHL will reopen as soon as air safety standards can be met.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


YSD's Megan Anderson Reilly is a state Teacher of the Year Finalist. Find out of she won at 5pm TONIGHT! (Photo)
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 09/14/20 12:06 PM
2020-09/3536/138028/Megan_Anderson-Reilly_Facebook_Art_-_8-2020.jpg
2020-09/3536/138028/Megan_Anderson-Reilly_Facebook_Art_-_8-2020.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3536/138028/thumb_Megan_Anderson-Reilly_Facebook_Art_-_8-2020.jpg

OSPI will announce the state teacher of the year LIVE on their Facebook account tonight, September 14, at 5pm. Instructions for watching are included below.

The Yakima School District's Megan Anderson Reilly is the Regional Teacher of the Year and a candidate for the State Teacher of the Year award.

For more about Megan and her award, please go here: https://www.smore.com/pgs7z

 

Meet the finalists

You can get ready for the ceremony by learning a little bit about each of the Regional Classified School Employees and Teachers of the Year on the OSPI Medium Site.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3536/138028/Megan_Anderson-Reilly_Facebook_Art_-_8-2020.jpg , 2020-09/3536/138028/OSPI_Educator_Awards.png

Oregon Health Policy Board meets September 15 for educational webinar
Oregon Health Authority - 09/14/20 8:23 AM

September 14, 2020

Contact: Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: September 15, 8-9 a.m.

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line.

Details: A webinar on the Impacts of COVID-19 on Oregon's health care providers will be provided to board members and the public. The webinar will address the impacts of COVID-19 on health care providers, including presenting data from surveys of Oregon providers and reflections from provider organizations on what their members are experiencing. The webinar will also discuss federal and state funding supports for providers, and the ongoing monitoring conducted by OHA staff. Attendance by board members is optional, and no official business will be conducted – the webinar is informational only.

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/index.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Deer Ridge Correctional Institution addresses adult in custody protest
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/14/20 8:14 AM

Updated contact information for Deer Ridge Correctional Facility

On September 11 at around 10:00 p.m., male adults in custody (AICs) at Deer Ridge Correctional Institution (DRCI) left their housing units to protest emergency conditions put in place by the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) in response to state wildfires. Approximately 200 male AICs refused to follow direction and return to their housing units from the yard. All but 12 AICs returned to their housing units by 2:00 a.m. on September 12.  DOC’s Crisis Negotiation Team was deployed, and no force was used to clear the yard. The remaining 12 AICs were placed in special housing and transferred to another institution. No employee or AICs required medical treatment. 

There are two facilities on-site at DRCI – one minimum security and one medium security. As of September 10, the DRCI AICs were being housed in the medium facility and needed to be transferred to the minimum facility to accommodate the multi-custody level evacuees from Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF). Before this move, the minimum facility was vacant. 

At this time, the men do not have access to traditional phones because the minimum facility had not been in use since 2016 and phones could not be set up with such short notice. DOC employees had been working to provide the men in the minimum facility with phone calls via employee work phones. DRCI is collaborating with our AIC telephone provider to install ten new AIC phones in this facility. Because the CCCF AICs were moved into the active facility, they have access to phones, video calls, and tablets. 

The protesting AICs demanded changes to emergency operations, citing the poor air quality from wildfires, temporary lack of access to phones, and other disruptions caused by the CCCF evacuation. DRCI employees will continue to communicate with AICs as the state battles historic wildfires across Oregon. An ongoing investigation is being conducted to determine the cause of the incident.

Deer Ridge Correctional Institution (DRCI) is located four miles east of Madras in central Oregon. DRCI is a multi-custody prison that currently houses 947 minimum-custody incarcerated adults. DRCI provides a range of correctional programs and services including education and trades programs, mental health treatment, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work crews. Construction began in October 2005 with the first minimum-security adults in custody (AICs) arriving in September 2007. DRCI is the largest minimum-custody facility in the state and Oregon’s fourteenth prison.


Five insurance tips for wildfire recovery
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/14/20 8:00 AM

Salem – The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation has five tips for homeowners and renters who have evacuated or been affected by fire, smoke, and ash damage.

  • Call your insurance company to check your policy. Let your company know if you have evacuated. Coverage is typically available for fire, smoke, and ash damage to your home and personal property.
  • Ask about your auto coverage, too. You need comprehensive coverage on your auto policy to cover fire, smoke, and ash damage, no matter where your vehicle is located at time of the loss.
  • If you had to evacuate, save your receipts and, when it is safe, let your insurance company know you evacuated. Your homeowners policy may pay for expenses such as lodging, food, and even pet boarding due to a mandatory evacuation. Be sure to check with your insurance company to confirm your specific coverage.
  • If you have not evacuated and it is safe to do so, make a quick home inventory by taking photos or video of each room in your home. Pay close attention to what is on the walls and in drawers and closets. Don’t forget storage areas such as the attic and garage. Check your insurance company’s website for an app or checklist that will help. Or use the Insure U Home Inventory Checklist.
  • If your personal belongings are damaged, the insurance company will request a list of items that are damaged or destroyed. Take some time to work on your home inventory list now. Look through your photos and videos to help recall personal items. Be sure to look for smaller items, such as jewelry. To the best of your ability, write down the age, original cost, and replacement cost of each item.

Following these tips will help save you money, time, and stress during a wildfire. For more information on preparing for a wildfire, visit the division’s wildfire page.

Oregonians that have been forced to evacuate their homes because of area wildfires should contact their insurance companies as soon as possible to let them know they have evacuated and discuss next steps. If you still have questions or concerns, the division’s Advocacy Team is here to help. Call the team at 888-877-4894 (toll-free) or visit dfr.oregon.gov.

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About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR:

The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.

 


The Benton- Franklin Workforce Development Council secured more than $1 million for local resources
Benton-Franklin Workforce Development Council - 09/14/20 7:49 AM

Help is here!

The Benton-Franklin Workforce Development Council (BFWDC) is committed to contributing to solutions related to the COVID-19 disaster and address the impacts of widespread unemployment by obtaining resources that support getting people back to work. In collaboration with he Washington Workforce Association (WWA), Employment Security Department (ESD), and other stakeholders, the BFWDC secured more than $1 million through two National Dislocated Worker Grants from the U.S. Department of Labor.

The Disaster Recovery National Dislocated Worker Grant will help aid the Benton and Franklin community by providing temporary employment opportunities to workers who are laid-off as a result of the pandemic.  These job opportunities will respond to or mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 disaster by offering temporary employment in positions within sanitation and clean-up, delivery services, food bank support, childcare workers, and other humanitarian aid positions.  The grant will also assist laid-off workers with:

  • Job search and placement into jobs on the state’s COVID-19 essential jobs list and other high demand occupations.
  • Short-term job readiness training.
  • Long-term training to help people enter secure careers as the economy recovers.

The Employment Recovery National Dislocated Worker Grant will provide re-employment assistance and short-term or longer-term training opportunities to help permanently laid-off workers.  Eligible individuals will gain the skills and education needed to be prepared for economic recovery and obtain family-sustaining employment into in-demand occupations.

To access these resources, please contact us!

WorkSource Columbia Basin main line: (509) 734-5900 and press 7

Programs’ Contact: (509) 734-5919

While WSCB is currently closed to the public due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all services are available virtually. Our Employment Specialists are ready to help you with your job search today.

The Benton-Franklin Workforce Development Council is an equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Washington Relay 711.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

For Press Only
Contact: Diana Hamilton 
dhamilton@bf-wdc.org


Sun. 09/13/20
Oregon Wildfire Response Update: September 13, 2020
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/13/20 5:34 PM

Salem, OR – September 13, 2020 – State, federal, county and tribal partners are fully engaged in response and recovery efforts for the more than 30 fires burning statewide in Oregon.

With thick smoke limiting aviation resources, firefighters are struggling to contain the fires, the largest of which is more than 55 miles wide. 

More than 1 million acres have burned, leaving thousands of Oregonians displaced from their homes. A total of 3,023 people are currently being supported in shelters run by local counties, the state and the American Red Cross. Shelters are following COVID-19 guidance for group and non-congregate settings to limit spread of the virus. Many evacuated Oregonians are sheltering with friends and family, while others are staying in RVs or vehicles. The American Red Cross has temporary shelters available throughout western Oregon, and those shelters have space available for more evacuees. For a list of temporary shelters, see the Red Cross Oregon website.  

Help donations go where they are needed most
Though well intended, please do not take donations to evacuation centers. Counties have received an influx of donations of materials they are unable to distribute. Unsolicited goods burden local organizations’ ability to meet survivors’ confirmed needs, drawing away valuable volunteer labor, transportation and warehouse space.  

At this time, the best way for the public to help people who are affected by wildfires is to make a financial contribution to the American Red Cross or one of the certified organizations that are members of Oregon Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster. These on-the-ground organizations know what items and quantities are needed, often buy in bulk with discounts and, if possible, purchase through businesses local to the disaster, which supports economic recovery.

To donate food, water and other items, reach out to your local food pantry or Community Action Partnership to see if they are able to receive donations. Find food pantries at https://foodfinder.oregonfoodbank.org/.  Community Action Partnership of Oregon: https://caporegon.org/   Phone: 503-316-3951

Help find and reunite loved ones: 
OEM urges the public to update information on their status with the Red Cross. Let loved ones know you are safe at the American Red Cross Safe and Well Website. State emergency managers encourage people affected by the fires, whether or not they have evacuated, to register on the site. It is a helpful tool that can bring relief to people looking for loved ones during these fires, and help inform search efforts. 

Resources
News media and the public can receive news releases from the Oregon Office of Emergency Management by signing up with an email address at the FlashAlert website

Members of the public who are seeking additional information, dial 211 or 1-866-698-6155. You can also text your zip code to 898211 (TXT211). 

Visit wildfire.oregon.gov to for information about donating, volunteering, packing checklist and emergency response agency websites by county.


142nd Wing deploys in support of OPLAN Smokey (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 09/13/20 3:56 PM
142nd-wg-airmen-leave-oplan-smokey 5
142nd-wg-airmen-leave-oplan-smokey 5
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/962/137977/thumb_200913-Z-ON660-109.jpg

PORTLAND AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Ore. Members of the 142nd Wing are deploying in support of efforts to contain and mitigate multiple wildland fires raging across the state of Oregon.

75 Airmen departed Portland Air National Guard Base, Ore. at 0900 today. They will be serving first in Echo Mountain, south of Salem, Ore., then dispersing to wherever they are needed.   

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Video/B-roll/imagery of recent operations and training:

https://www.dvidshub.net/video/766897/142nd-wing-airmen-support-oregon-wildfire-fighting
142nd Wing Citizen Airmen, leave to support the containment of wildfires that have erupted across the state Sept. 13, 2020, Portland, Oregon. This movement is a part of Operation Plan Smokey which makes Oregon National Guard troops available to the Oregon Department of Forestry to help with emergencies. (U.S. Air National Guard video by Staff Sgt. Sean Campbell)

https://www.dvidshub.net/image/6349227/142nd-wg-airmen-leave-oplan-smokey
Oregon Air National Guard members from the 142nd Wing load busses before leaving from the Portland Air National Guard Base, Portland, Ore., Sept. 13, 2020, in support of Operation Plan Smokey. The Airmen previously received training to be ready to provide wildfire relief efforts in a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Valerie R. Seelye)

News Story:
https://www.dvidshub.net/news/377989/portland-air-national-guard-bases-142nd-wing-deploys-guardsmen-help-combat-raging-wildfires

https://www.dvidshub.net/video/760938/orng-red-card-certification

More photos from this event can be found on the Portland Air National Guard DVIDS page.
https://www.dvidshub.net/unit/142WG

 

About the 142nd Wing

The Portland Air National Guard Base employs 1,400 Airmen who provide an economic impact of nearly $130 million to the region. The 142nd Wing defends our homeland with F-15 Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian border, on 24-hour Aerospace Control Alert as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.




Attached Media Files: 142nd-wg-airmen-leave-oplan-smokey 5 , 142nd-wg-airmen-leave-oplan-smokey 4 , 142nd-wg-airmen-leave-oplan-smokey 3 , 142nd-wg-airmen-leave-oplan-smokey 2 , 142nd-wg-airmen-leave-oplan-smokey 1

Pacific Power crews gaining momentum in restoration efforts
Pacific Power - 09/13/20 3:25 PM

Media hotline: 503-813-6018

NOTE TO MEDIA: Images of restoration work underway are available for use, via this link. Photo credit: Pacific Power

Pacific Power crews gaining momentum in restoration efforts

Cooler temperatures and calmed winds allow progress; employees deliver supplies to communities hardest hit from Oregon’s historic windstorm

 

PORTLAND, Ore. (Sept. 13, 2020) —Pacific Power crew members, nearly 500 strong, are making substantial progress in restoring power to areas hit by unprecedented wind-driven wildfires, restoring another 1,700 customers in the last 24 hours.  The company is making plans to restore more than 3,000 customers in Southern Oregon later this evening.

 

As of 3 pm Sunday, approximately 8,900 customers remain without service in Oregon and northern California due to recent historic wind storm and wildfire activity. An additional 2,500 are out of service until sometime later today due to a PSPS event in Weed, Calif.

 

“The progress we’ve made over the weekend is encouraging, and we continue to be ready and staged with supplies in areas where we are still awaiting access to be granted by first responders,” said David Lucas, vice president of operations. “As our communities come together in response to this historic, statewide event, Pacific Power will continue to work around the clock to help restore power and support our neighbors and friends.”

 

Community spirit

Pacific Power employees are rolling up their sleeves wherever they can, supporting the communities they serve. As they are out and about, they are reporting back stories that exemplify true community spirit:

 

  • Glide: 138 Grill  – The only restaurant still operating in Glide, east of Roseburg and close to the fire lines, the 138 Grill has been feeding firefighters and local residents for several days for free. Saturday, Sam Carter, Pacific Power regional business manager for Douglas County, brought a truck load of food to the grill so they could continue their work.
  • Klamath County: Hay Trucks – Local farmers sent 10 truckloads of hay to the Willamette Valley to help feed livestock displaced by the wildfire. “They saw that the folks on the West side were hurting and just like that, organized this hay convoy,” said Todd Andres, regional business manager in Klamath County.
  • Southern Oregon: Emergency Supplies – Local employees helped procure and deliver chainsaws and generators to local areas to help people clear their land of downed trees and to get power flowing to essential services as the restoration progresses. They also delivered vital supplies, including blankets sleeping bags, towels, pillows and essential personal care supplies to evacuees at the Jackson County Expo Center and non-perishable food, diapers, and masks to the Talent– Phoenix donation site.
  • Willamette Valley: Hotel Vouchers – Regional business manager Cooper Whitman is coordinating donations to provide hotel vouchers so people evacuated from their homes can move from cots in shelters to hotel rooms.

 

“Our hearts go out to all that have been affected by the historic wind events this past week. We are part of the communities we serve and are devastated by what we’re seeing as our friends, neighbors and our own employees are forced to evacuate,” said Lucas. “We are here to help support the Red Cross and local agencies who are providing much needed relief to community members and thank our emergency responders and all those on the frontlines for their tireless work to keep us all safe.”

 

How to be ready, how to get help

Pacific Power customer care agents are available and ready to help customers through this incredibly difficult time. They can be reached 24/7 at 1-888-221-7070.

 

Customers should be prepared for prolonged power outages by having on hand adequate food, water and back-up batteries. They are also encouraged to follow any local evacuation orders and look out for neighbors.


The company is working with the Red Cross and local agencies to directly aid people in need. Support is available for those in wildfire-affected areas at the following community shelter locations:

 

Oregon:

  • Josephine County Fairgrounds – 1451 Fairgrounds Rd, Grants Pass
  • Jackson County Expo – 1 Peninger Rd, Central Point
  • Oregon State Fairgrounds – 2330 17th St. NE, Salem
  • Klamath County Fair Grounds – 3531 S 6th St, Klamath Falls
  • Kla-Mo-Ya Casino – 34333 US-97, Chiloquin
  • Lincoln City Community Center--2150 NE Oar Place
  • Linn County Fairgrounds – 3700 Knox Butte Rd E, Albany
  • Benton County Fairgrounds – 110 SW 53rd St, Corvallis
  • Deschutes County Fairgrounds – 3800 SW Airport Way, Redmond
  • Douglas County Fairgrounds – 2110 Frear St., Roseburg
  • Polk County Fairgrounds – 520 S Pacific Hwy W, Rickreall

 

Northern California:

  • Kahtishraam Wellness Center – 1403 Kahtishraam, Yreka
  • Siskiyou County Fairgrounds (taking large animals) – 1712 Fairlane Rd, Yreka

 

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Oregon reports 185 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/20 11:01 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed five more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 509, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 185 new cases today, bringing the state total to 29,337.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (9), Curry (1), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Gilliam (1), Jackson (13), Jefferson (1), Josephine (4), Lane (8), Lincoln (1), Linn (3), Malheur (26), Marion (27), Morrow (1), Multnomah (38), Polk (6), Umatilla (6), Wasco (1), Washington (33).

The 504th COVID-19 death reported yesterday, Sept. 12, was deemed to be an out-of-state resident and has been removed from our case counts. This case was reported to the appropriate state of residence.

Oregon’s 505th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Sept. 7 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 506th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept.12 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 507th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 12 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 508th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept. 12 at his residence. He had underlying conditions

Oregon’s 509th COVID-19 death is a 89-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Aug. 31 and died on Sept. 10 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

 

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

90

2

1,464

Benton

244

6

11,618

Clackamas

2,151

59

55,254

Clatsop

102

0

5,109

Columbia

143

1

6,392

Coos

131

0

6,094

Crook

59

1

2,388

Curry

26

0

1,518

Deschutes

723

12

26,778

Douglas

188

3

11,734

Gilliam

5

0

257

Grant

8

0

822

Harney

12

0

742

Hood River

238

0

4,660

Jackson

967

3

30,127

Jefferson

487

8

4,404

Josephine

178

2

10,860

Klamath

242

2

9,487

Lake

29

0

803

Lane

846

13

57,417

Lincoln

473

13

8,206

Linn

431

13

14,994

Malheur

1,407

22

4,632

Marion

4,248

87

43,598

Morrow

471

4

1,602

Multnomah

6,556

127

129,827

Polk

481

15

8,013

Sherman

18

0

321

Tillamook

45

0

2,801

Umatilla

2,844

41

12,275

Union

431

2

3,237

Wallowa

23

1

888

Wasco

227

3

4,584

Washington

4,107

55

84,413

Wheeler

0

0

157

Yamhill

706

14

15,807

Total

29,337

509

583,283

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

 

 

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


Oregon State Police Investigating Officer Involved Shooting - Lake County
Oregon State Police - 09/13/20 10:05 AM

On September 12, 2020, at approximately 2:32 P.M., Lake County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to the Interstate 8 Motel in Lakeview for a reported 10-15 shots fired.

As the first arriving deputy awaited backup, a male subject exited a motel room with a handgun. The subject pointed the firearm at the deputy and refused commands to drop the weapon the deputy fired one round and the suspect went back into the room and closed the door.  

Oregon State Police SWAT team responded to the scene. Upon entering the motel room an adult male was located deceased.

Oregon State Police Major Crimes Section and Oregon State Police Forensics Division responded to the scene to investigate.

As protocol the involved deputy has been placed on paid administrative leave. 

Any further information will be released by or with the permission of the Lake County District Attorney's Office.