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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Sun. Jul. 15 - 9:45 pm
Sun. 07/15/18
Double fatality crash Hwy 211 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 07/15/18 12:11 PM

On July 15, 2018 at approximately 9;15 AM Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on hwy 211 near mp 20. 

Two people are confirm deceased and two people have been transported to the hospital for injuries.

A detour is in place, however expect delays for several hours while the troopers investigate.

No more information to be released at this time.


"Scoop It Forward" Promotes Random Acts of Ice Cream (Photo)
Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council - 07/15/18 6:21 AM
Special ice cream delivery to police
Special ice cream delivery to police
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/4131/116217/thumb_6_Special_ice_cream_delivery_to_Tigard_Police.JPG

Today is National Ice Cream Day, which also kicks off a celebration of appreciation called “Scoop It Forward.” Supported by Oregon’s dairy farmers and processors, the weeklong campaign, from July 15 to 22, encourages people to show appreciation for one another through random acts of ice cream.

Ice cream is one of those things that just makes everything better, and we saw this as a simple way to bring positivity and joy to people’s lives in surprising and unexpected ways,” said Josh Thomas, Senior Director of Communications for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “Random acts of kindness can be contagious, and our call to action is simply for people to spread the good and pay it forward.”

Leading up to this week, there have already been surprise ice cream deliveries to a playground, a skate park, a police station and Pioneer Courthouse Square in downtown Portland. And that’s just the beginning. Each person who receives ice cream is encouraged to recognize at least two others with a special delivery of their own.

Suggestions include recognizing family, friends, neighbors, a favorite teacher, local police or fire departments or even complete strangers. Photos and video from these moments will be shared on social media using the hashtag #ScoopItForward. Those who aren’t able to give ice cream are encouraged to send ice cream emojis with a message of appreciation. Organizers hope the positivity will spread far and wide.

“This is such a simple gesture that anybody can do,” said Thomas. “You can’t buy happiness, but you can buy ice cream, and that’s pretty close”

# # #

NOTE: We can arrange surprise deliveries for photos or videos this week. Call us to make arrangements.

Oregon ice cream brands include:

  • Alden’s Organic
  • Alpenrose
  • Cascade Glacier
  • Eberhards
  • Julie’s Organic
  • Lochmead
  • Ruby Jewel
  • Salt and Straw
  • Sunshine
  • Tillamook
  • Upstar
  • Umpqua
  • YoCream



Attached Media Files: Special ice cream delivery to police , Dairy Princess Ambassadors free ice cream coupons , Playground with kids , Playground ice cream delivery for kids , Playground free ice cream , A Scoop It Forward logo

Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Two in Umatilla County
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/15/18 1:23 AM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on July 14, 2018, at approximately 11:00 p.m. in the 500 block of West Madrona Avenue in Hermiston, OR. This single-family fire affected 2 adults. 

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Sat. 07/14/18
Both drivers killed in crash on Hwy 99W (Lane County)
Oregon State Police - 07/14/18 4:46 PM

On Friday July 13, 2018 at approximately 4:35 PM, Oregon State Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on SR-99W near milepost 111, south of Junction City.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a black 1995 Chevrolet Tahoe SUV, operated by Aleeshaeseana Gordon-Germain, age 40, of Junction City was traveling north on SR-99W when for an unknown reason crossed over into the southbound lanes of travel and crashed head on into a southbound blue 2004 Chevrolet Silverado Pickup, operated by William Galt IV, age 22, of Eugene.

Both drivers suffered fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased on scene. 

OSP Troopers were assisted by Junction City Fire, Junction City PD, Lane County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT, and T&M Towing.

The southbound lane of SR-99W was shut down for approximately 4 hours.


Fri. 07/13/18
Child Welfare Advisory Committee meets Wednesday, July 18 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/13/18 3:59 PM

July 13, 2018

Contact: Christine Stone, 503-602-8027; istine.l.stone@state.or.us">christine.l.stone@state.or.us.

Child Welfare Advisory Committee meets Wednesday, July 18 in Salem

The Child Welfare Advisory Committee meets Wednesday, July 18, 9 a.m. to noon at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 166, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda will be added when available.

About the Child Welfare Advisory Committee: The legislative-mandated 21-member Child Welfare Advisory Committee counsels the agency on the development and administration of the policies, programs and practices.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Cheloya.D.Chase@state.or.us; 503-945-6731.

                                                             # # #


Girl Scouts Reach for the Stars, Envision STEM Future at Pine Mountain Observatory in Central Oregon (Public Viewing Friday Evening) (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington - 07/13/18 3:26 PM
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington Astronomy Adventure
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington Astronomy Adventure
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/6250/115629/thumb_27908150_10154928262475882_3676806621651358207_o.jpg

Girl Scouts Reach for the Stars, Envision STEM Future at Pine Mountain Observatory in Central Oregon

Public Viewing TONIGHT, Friday, 7/13/18

Girls from around the nation (including girls from Oregon and Washington) to experience hands-on astronomy exploration, real-world skills thanks to NASA, the SETI Institute and the University of Oregon

PORTLAND, Ore. – July 13, 2018 – Girl Scouts from throughout the United States have stellar STEM opportunities this summer, thanks to the "Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts," SETI Institute’s cooperative agreement with NASA.

“Girls will have a chance to make friends from throughout the country while sleeping out under the stars in a National Forest,” says Shannon Joseph, STEM Specialist for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “The girls will learn to operate telescopes, engage in solar and dark sky observations, collect and analyze data and flex their leadership muscles. And, while they’re having a great time, they're also getting a chance to see a future for themselves in the STEM fields.”

“This is an exceptional opportunity to embrace the Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington and Pine Mountain Observatory into our scope of work,” says Pamela Harman, Acting Director of Education at the SETI Institute. “The local Girl Scout council will deliver an excellent camping experience, the Observatory will deliver dark skies and observing opportunities and the SETI Institute will lead the girls through activities they can take home to their local troops and councils.”

“Pine Mountain Observatory (PMO) and UO Physics are excited to support this new program! We especially look forward to having Girl Scouts visit the observatory for an extended stay,” says Scott Fisher, Director of PMO. “The four-day excursion will give the girls a chance to fully engage with PMO and the STEM experience. It is my hope that all of our visitors leave the summit with a new appreciation for the universe we inhabit, as well as a genuine positive experience with the environment, the observatory, and most importantly, science itself. I hope to see these Girl Scouts pursue studies in Physics or Astronomy in the near future.”

WHO

Ten (10) Girl Scouts from throughout the United States, including Girl Scouts from Oregon (Portland and Milwaukie) and Washington, will participate in an Astronomy Adventure.

The girls will join University of Oregon undergraduate women, the Observatory Director, and other professional instructors for solar observing by day, deep sky observing by night, and camping in the beautiful Deschutes National Forest of Central Oregon.

WHAT THE PARTICIPANTS WILL DO

  • Operate telescopes and engage in solar observation
  • Collect data, learn how to manipulate data into an image
  • Explore fun astronomy activities
  • Flex leadership muscles
  • Develop new astronomy expertise
  • Meet new friends from across the USA
  • Sleep out under the stars in a National Forest
  • Geocaching
  • Camp, build campfires (weather dependent) and develop outdoor skills

Photography by Justin Hartney http://www.justinhartney.com/

WHEN

Girls Scouts will participate in the Astronomy Adventure from July 10-14, 2018

Public Viewing Friday Evening (7/13/18)

The public is welcome for viewing on the evening of Friday, July 13, 2018. Programs commence at approximately 8:30 p.m., around sunset. Groups of 8 or more are requited to provide advance notification. For information, scheduling and questions, please contact:

Alton Lukem Operations Manager, Pine Mountain Observatory

541-382-8331 | aluken@uoregon.edu

GSOSW staff on-site at Pine Mountain Observatory:

Jen Akins,  Travel Pathway Program Specialist
541-499-1446, Mobile | jakins@girlscoutsosw.org

Shannon Joseph, STEM Program Specialist, sjoseph@girlscoutsosw.org

WHERE

Pine Mountain Observatory in the Deschutes National Forest of Central Oregon

Pine Mountain Observatory, in the Deschutes National Forest of Central Oregon, offers a unique opportunity to observe the skies from mountaintop telescopes and learn about astronomy.

For more information, please visit: https://pmo.uoregon.edu/.

Live camera at Pine Mountain Observatory:

http://128.223.164.214/view/view.shtml?id=83&imagepath=%2Fmjpg%2Fvideo.mjpg&size=1

WHY

Research shows women are still vastly under-represented in STEM fields and exposing girls to these subjects at a young age is vital to ignite their curiosity and close this gap. Girl Scouts, the SETI Institute and the University of Oregon support helping young women succeed in working in these impact fields.

HOW

The SETI Institute is leading a five-year program called “Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts,” which NASA’s Science Mission Directorate will fund through 2020.

To learn more, please visit: https://www.girlscouts.org/en/about-girl-scouts/our-partners/SETI-institute.html

“Girl Scouts, the SETI Institute and the University of Oregon share a passion for inspiring and empowering the next generation of female leaders through science, technology, engineering, and math programs,” says Karen Hill, Chief Executive Officer for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “This exciting collaboration gives girls rare hands-on experiences that broaden their view of our world, our solar system, and most importantly of their own future potential in STEM and beyond.”

ABOUT THE GIRLS

Ten Girl Scouts – hailing from Arizona, Oklahoma, Oregon (Portland and Milwaukie), Maine, Massachusetts, Utah, Vermont, Virginia and Washington – will participate in the program. While they come from different places and have a variety of interests, from speech and debate to mountain biking, film club to violin, the girls all share a strong interest in astronomy, engineering and physics. In their own words:

“When I was little, I wanted to be an astronaut so I could explore outer space and perhaps even travel to another planet. I’ve visited two observatories and each time I get to glimpse through the lens, I fall in love with our world a little bit more.”

“This trip will give me the chance to explore the topic of astronomy and to ask specific questions about studying science in college and what to expect as a woman in the STEM fields.”

“In the future, I’d like to be an engineer and work with satellites and robots/rovers of NASA to gather scientific data to learn more about the universe we live in. This program will allow me to learn more about operating telescopes, and exploring the many scientific and engineering endeavors astronomy has to offer.”

MAKING AN IMPACT: GIRL SCOUT ALUMNA SECURES NASA INTERNSHIP
Programming such as this Astronomy Adventure make an impact. Participation in a Girl Scout Destinations trip to Space Camp in Huntsville, Alabama in summer 2017 inspired Rosemary Williams, Girl Scout alumna from GSOSW Troop 20022, to reach for her dreams and seek a future in space science. Rosemary has attained a paid 10-week internship with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) this summer, and she is currently a mechanical engineering major at Oregon State University.

"Going to work at NASA has been my dream for a very long time," says Rosemary Williams, engineering student at Oregon State University and Girl Scout alumna from Troop 20022 in Oregon. "When I found out I would be an intern at NASA Ames Research Center this summer I was absolutely over the moon. I am incredibly excited for this opportunity and I'm so ready to be surrounded by people who share my love for math and science and, most importantly, for space."

Rosemary Williams is available for media interviews by phone, or on-site at NASA in Florida. Interested media should contact communications@girlscoutsosw.org.

INTERESTED MEDIA

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington’s

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON | GSOSW

Our council serves 13,955 girls in 38 counties with the help of over 10,000 volunteers. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. Every opportunity in Girl Scouting develops these essential skills in an all-girl, inclusive, safe environment. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

OTHER GSOSW STEM PROGRAMMING

Girl Scout Astronomy Club Training At Goddard Space Flight Center—This week, teams from ten selected Girl Scout councils, including Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington, are taking part in an intensive weeklong space science training at NASA’s premier research facility in Greenbelt, Maryland. Teams are made up of two high school Girl Scouts (entering grades 9, 10 OR 11 in Fall 2018), one Girl Scout volunteer, and one amateur astronomer. Participants will learn how to start their own astronomy club back home and have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to connect directly with NASA scientists.

To learn more about other GSOSW STEM program opportunities, please visit:

http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/our-council/news/2018/to_the_moon_and_back.html

http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/our-council/news/2018/april_is_stem_month_.html

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF THE U.S.A. (GSUSA)

The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. The impact of Girl Scouts in the United States is reflected in the fact that 90 percent of female astronauts, 80 percent of female technology leaders and 75 percent of female senators are Girl Scout alumnae. To learn more about Girl Scouts of the U.S.A., visit girlscouts.org.

About the GSUSA STEM Pledge, https://www.girlscouts.org/en/press-room/press-room/news-releases/2017/girl-scouts-announces-STEM-pledge.html

About GSUSA STEM Programming, https://www.girlscouts.org/en/about-girl-scouts/girl-scouts-and-stem.html

ABOUT THE SETI INSTITUTE

Founded in 1984, the SETI Institute is a non-profit, multi-disciplinary research and education organization whose mission is to explore, understand, and explain the origin and nature of life in the universe. Our research encompasses the physical and biological sciences and leverages expertise in data analytics, machine learning and advanced signal detection technologies. The Institute is a distinguished research partner for industry, academia and government agencies, including NASA and NSF. To connect with the SETI Institute, visit www.seti.org.

ABOUT NASA

NASA leads the nation on a great journey of discovery, seeking new knowledge and understanding of our Sun, Earth, solar system, and the universe. The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) searches for answers across three overarching themes: Safeguarding and improving life on Earth, searching for life elsewhere, and discovering the secrets of the Universe. SMD’s STEM Science Activation program advances STEM to improve U.S. scientific literacy through the leveraging of partners such as Girl Scouts of the USA and the SETI Institute. 

“Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts” is based upon work supported by NASA Science under cooperative agreement No. NNX16AB90A. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.




Attached Media Files: Girl Scouts SETI NASA Astronomy Adventure Press Release , Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington Astronomy Adventure , From Pine Mtn Observatory w/ robotic telescope June 2018 , Pine Mtn Observatory by Justin Hartney , Rosemary Williams Girl Scout and NASA Intern , Rosemary Williams NASA Intern and Girl Scout , Girl Scouts Pine Mountain Observatory , Girl Scouts Pine Mountain Observatory

Three Gypsy Joker Motorcycle Club Members and Associates Indicted for Murder and Kidnapping in Aid of Racketeering
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/13/18 2:45 PM

Club members accused of kidnapping, torturing and murdering a former club member and resident of southeast Portland

PORTLAND. Ore. – A federal grand jury has returned a four-count indictment charging three members and associates of the Gypsy Joker Outlaw Motorcycle Club (GJOMC) for racketeering, kidnapping and murder. The indictment was returned on June 28, 2018 and unsealed today.

The indictment was announced by Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General John P. Cronan of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division; Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon; Darek Pleasants, Special Agent in Charge of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosive’s (ATF) Seattle Field Division; and Danielle Outlaw, Chief of Police of the Portland Police Bureau (PPB).

“The defendants allegedly violently kidnapped and murdered Robert Huggins to maintain and advance their positions in the Gypsy Joker Outlaw Motorcycle gang,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Cronan. “This indictment is an important step toward dismantling this violent gang, and should send a clear message that the Department of Justice will bring to justice those who commit such heinous criminals mes on our streets.”

“Pursuing organized criminal organizations and individual members that commit violent crimes and threaten public safety is a top priority for the Department of Justice and the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the District of Oregon,” said U.S. Attorney Williams. “We will use every law enforcement tool available to hold members of criminal organizations accountable for their violent and lawless criminal gang activity.”

“ATF remains committed to combatting violent crime organizations that endanger our communities,” said SAC Pleasants. “ATF will always stand shoulder to shoulder with our law enforcement partners to protect the public.”

“The Portland Police Bureau is proud to be a part of this collaborative effort that resulted in the indictment of people engaged in violent activity,” said Chief Outlaw. “Violent crime deeply affects our community and by working in partnership, we can use effective strategies to locate those individuals who are responsible for violence and hold them accountable.”

Mark Leroy Dencklau, 58, of Woodburn, Oregon; Earl Deverle Fisher, 48, of Gresham, Oregon; and Tiler Evan Pribbernow, 37, of Portland are charged with:

  • Murder in aid of racketeering in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1959(a)(1);
  • kidnapping in aid of racketeering, resulting in death in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1959(a)(1) and 18 U.S.C. § 2;
  • kidnapping resulting in death in violation of 18 U.S.C. §§ 1201(a)(1) and (2);
  • and conspiracy to commit kidnapping, resulting in death in violation of 18 U.S.C. §§ 1201(a)(1) and 1201(c)

in a case stemming from the June 30-July 1, 2015 kidnapping and murder of Robert Huggins, a former GJOMC member and resident of southeast Portland.

According to the indictment, GJOMC oversees several “support clubs” in Oregon and Washington, including the Road Brothers Northwest Motorcycle Club, Solutions Motorcycle Club, Northwest Veterans Motorcycle Club, High-Side Riders, and the Freedom Fellowship Motorcycle Club. The indictment alleges that the three men engaged in the violent actions leading to Huggins’ death for the purpose of maintaining and increasing their positions in the GJOMC criminal enterprise.

Dencklau, Fisher and Pribbernow made their initial appearances before a U.S. Magistrate Judge in Portland on July 9, 10, and 13, 2018, respectively.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

This case was investigated by the PPB and ATF, with assistance from the Clark County, Washington Sheriff’s Office, the Oregon State Police, and the Oregon and Washington State Crime Labs. Leah K. Bolstad, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, is prosecuting the case with Rebecca A. Staton, Trial Attorney for the Criminal Division’s Organized Crime and Gang Section.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone. Attorney General Jeff Sessions reinvigorated PSN in 2017 as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, locally-based strategies to reduce violent crime.

# # #


Heat wave: Tips from Pacific Power to be safe, stay cool and use less energy
Pacific Power - 07/13/18 2:15 PM

Pacific Power media hotline:                                           July 13, 2018

1-800-570-5838                                                               FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Heat wave

Tips from Pacific Power to be safe, stay cool and use less energy

 

Yakima, Wash.. —With forecasts predicting triple-digit temperatures throughout Southern Oregon over the coming week, Pacific Power wants to remind customers to stay safe and use these tips to beat the heat, use less energy and save money.

 

Stay hydrated and watch for others

  • Drink water and stay out of direct sunlight as much as possible. Use hats and sunscreen.
  • Check on neighbors who you know have few outside contacts. Keep a close eye on children and pets to make sure they have water available and have some place to cool down.

 

     Don’t let the sun shine in

  • On hot days, close blinds and drapes, especially in south-facing windows which allow in the most heat.

 

     Open windows in the evening and circulate cool air

  • Open windows in the evening and early morning to let in cool air. Be aware, however, of any safety or security issues.
  • Use fans to bring in and circulate cool air. Ceiling and window fans use less electricity than an air conditioner when the compressor is engaged. Running an air conditioner in fan-only mode can also be effective as outside temperatures drop.

 

Reduce the heat inside

  • Use heat-producing appliances like ovens, dishwashers and dryers in the early morning or late evening when temperatures are cooler.
  • Grill outside or use a microwave or toaster oven. A toaster oven uses one-third to one-half as much energy as a regular oven and releases less heat into the home.
  • Turn off heat-generating devices when not in use, including lamps, televisions and computers.

 

Be air conditioner smart

  • Set your thermostat at 78 degrees. This will keep you comfortable and cooling your house below that temperature can increase your air conditioning bill as much as 8 percent.
  • Don’t turn off the air conditioner when you’re gone; instead set it higher, at 85 degrees. That setting allows your air conditioner to use less electricity to cool the house than if the air conditioning has been off all day, but doesn’t shut down altogether.
  • Your air conditioner will operate most efficiently if you trim nearby foliage to allow adequate air flow around the unit.
  • Don’t block inside distribution vents with furniture or other objects.
  • In the Northwest, less than half of all residences have air conditioning. Take advantage of malls, theatres or other public places that do have cooling systems.

 

Finally, be aware of fire danger

 

  • Electrical safety: Any spark can lead to a fire under current tinder dry conditions. Check any electrical connections on your property in out buildings or any temporary lines run to recreational vehicles or outside lighting. Are any wires or extension cords damaged or frayed? After a thorough inspection, take appropriate steps to reduce any risk.
  • Create a zone around your house that will slow any wildfire down and possibly direct it around your home. To do this, you must view your yard as a fuel source. Fire will only burn if fuel is present. Fuel can be your landscaping, woodpiles, decks, etc.

For more information and tips, visit bewattsmart.com.

 

About Pacific Power

Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 740,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages.


Nickell Wins Powerball Millions
Oregon Lottery - 07/13/18 10:45 AM

July 13, 2018 - Salem, Ore. – Steven Nickell of Salem still can’t believe the ticket he had in his wallet for two weeks was the $150.4 million Powerball jackpot winner.

Nickell purchased the ticket at the Circle K on Liberty Street in Salem, and said that he usually picks up tickets, then checks them when he goes to lunch. After he had a burger, he scanned his tickets and realized he needed to go to the Lottery headquarters – he thought he had won at least $600.

“When the clerk told me that wins over $600 have to go to the Lottery office, I thought I could buy my wife something nice for the 4th of July,” he said. “I had no idea that ticket was worth $150 million!”

Nickell took the ticket home, and about an hour before his wife got home, checked the numbers.

“I looked at ticket and couldn’t stop shaking!” he said.

When Nickell told his wife, they went into action, hiring a financial planner and lawyer. They also said they are going to be very careful with the $61 million lump sum they will receive after taxes.

“At first I felt guilty I won,” he said. “Then I realized that I’m the guy that gets to stand up and say BINGO! We all play the game, it just so happens I’m the guy who got to win this time.”

Nickell said he is happy to know his family will be taken care of in the future because of his win – and how he is being careful with the money.

Nickell’s win is the third largest Lottery win since the Oregon Lottery started in 1984. This is the fifth time a ticket sold in Oregon has won the Powerball jackpot prize. Previous winners include Dan Gannon of Milwaukie who won $182.7 million in 2006; The West and Chaney families of Medford who won $340 million in 2005; Robin Powell of Beaverton who won $33.8 million in 1999; and the Givens family of Eugene who won $38.4 million in 1992.

Powerball is a multi-state jackpot operated by 44 states, plus the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. By pooling a portion of each lottery’s Powerball sales, this game is able to offer players jackpots of far greater value than any lottery could offer alone.

On Jan. 11, Reggie Pearne of Jacksonville, won $1 million playing Powerball. And on Jan. 4, Ronald Ceci of Grants Pass won $2 million playing Powerball. He selected the Power Play option for an additional $1, which doubled his prize to a total of $2 million.

During the 2015-17 biennium in Marion County, where the Salem winner and Lottery retailer are located, more than $55.2 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org


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Motorcyclist killed in vehicle crash on Hwy 219 - Marion County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/13/18 10:28 AM
2018-07/1002/116183/fatal2.jpg
2018-07/1002/116183/fatal2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1002/116183/thumb_fatal2.jpg

On Thursday July 12, 2018 at about 5:38 PM hours, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on Highway 219 and Mahony Rd NE.

Investigation revealed that a 2000 Harley Davidson, operated by John STEWART age 75, of Port Angeles, Washington, was traveling northbound on Highway 219 when for unknown reasons the motorcycle veered into the oncoming lane hitting a 2015 International truck, operated by Finet Navan Carlos FALIG age 27, of Gresham, OR. 

Stewart suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Falig was not injured.

Highway 219  was closed for five and half hours following the crash.  OSP was assisted by Marion County Sheriff’s Office, St. Paul Fire and ODOT.

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1002/116183/fatal2.jpg

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets July 23 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 07/13/18 10:09 AM

July 13, 2018

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets July 23 in Portland

What: The bi-monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission

Agenda: Smoke free environment; assessment; GovSpace documents; report and legislative concepts from subcommittees; next steps to finalizing legislative concepts for September 24 meeting; listening tour; future meeting dates for commission; OMMP governance; public comment

When: Monday, July 23, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B (first floor), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference call line: 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, it advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.

More information on the commission's webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Oregon silverspot butterfly reintroduced to Saddle Mountain (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/13/18 10:06 AM
Oregon silverspot catterpillar - attribute Mike Patterson
Oregon silverspot catterpillar - attribute Mike Patterson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1303/116180/thumb_Oregon_silverspot_catterpillar_-_attribute_Mike_Patterson.jpg

Five hundred Oregon silverspot butterfly caterpillars have been released on the slopes of Saddle Mountain, part of a continuing effort to stabilize the declining species population in the state.

The reintroduction was led by a team from Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Oregon Zoo and Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle.

The Oregon silverspot butterfly (Speyeria zerene hippolyta) was federally listed as threatened in 1980, and population numbers have declined continuously over the last three decades. Today, just four isolated populations remain: three in Oregon and one in California.   

Saddle Mountain was chosen as the reintroduction site because a rare flower—the early blue violet—blooms in abundance there. Early blue violets are the main food source for the caterpillars as they mature into adult butterflies. The mountain is one of the few remaining areas where early blue violets grow in large enough quantities to sustain a butterfly population. Elsewhere, the delicate violets have been choked out by invasive weeds and forest succession.

“Saddle Mountain is prime real estate for Oregon silverspots,” said Trevor Taylor, manager for the reintroduction project at OPRD. “Our hope is the caterpillars will be the start of a vibrant and lasting butterfly population on the mountain.”

The caterpillars began their journey to the mountain as part of the imperiled species programs at Oregon Zoo and Woodland Park Zoo. Each year, a small number of female Oregon silverspots are collected from wild populations and brought to zoo conservation labs to lay eggs. The hatched larvae are raised over the winter and released into the wild when they’ve matured into caterpillars.

Funding for the reintroduction project was provided by the USFWS Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund.




Attached Media Files: Oregon silverspot catterpillar - attribute Mike Patterson , Oregon silverspot caterpillar - attribute Richard Szlemp , Early blue violet - attribute Oregon State Parks , Caterpillar reintroduction 4 - attribute Mike Patterson , Caterpillar reintroduction 3 - attribute Mike Patterson , Caterpillar reintroduction 2 - attribute Mike Patterson , Caterpillar reintroduction - attribute Mike Patterson , Saddle Mountain - attribute Oregon State Parks

Marine Board Approves Ford's Pond Rules, Facilities Grant, Opens Rulemaking
Oregon Marine Board - 07/13/18 8:25 AM

The Oregon State Marine Board met in Central Point on July 11, and approved a new rule for Ford’s Pond in Douglas County, approved a boating facility grant for Columbia County, and approved opening rulemaking on several items.

The Board approved a 5 mph speed limit and electric motor only regulation on Ford’s Pond in Douglas County.  The operating rules will be effective upon filing.  Ford’s Pond is a 95 acre pond owned by the City of Sutherlin.

The Board also approved a boating facility grant for Columbia County.  The county manages the Gilbert River boat ramp off the Multnomah Channel which is approximately seven miles from the confluence of the Gilbert and Columbia Rivers.  The short term tie-up dock has eight piling, with four that are broken, creating a serious safety hazard to boaters.  The best approach is to install pile sleeves that can be reused for future replacement by welding together additional lengths of piling and then vibrating the piles into the submerged ground.  This approach will extend the useful life of the structure by another 10-15 years while the county plans for future improvements to the dock to improve boater safety.  The county plans on refurbishing the docks by obtaining materials to replace hinge assemblies, rub strips, pile hoops, rollers and bull rails on the concrete docks.  The Board approved $19,000 in federal Boating Infrastructure Grant funds to match $21,613.50 of applicant match (from the county and numerous boating clubs).  The project total is $40,613.50. 

The Board also approved opening rulemaking for the following items:

  • Outfitter and Guides, OAR 250 Division 016
  • Personal Flotation Devices, OAR 250-010-0154
  • Insurance and Duplication of Fees, OAR 250-010-0315

Additionally, the Board elected to keep the existing roles for Board Chair and Vice Chair appointments. 

For more details about the grant applications and meeting materials, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx.

###

The Marine Board is funded by registration, title fees and marine fuel taxes paid by motorized boaters.  No lottery, general fund tax dollars or local facility parking fees are used to support the agency or its programs.  Boater-paid fees go back to boaters in the form of boating safety services (on-the-water enforcement, training and equipment), education/outreach materials and boating access facility grants (boat ramps, docks, parking, construction and maintenance).  The Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Permit program is dedicated funding to pay for border inspection stations, decontamination equipment, inspectors, and signage/outreach materials.  The Mandatory Education Program is self-supporting and revenue helps pay for education materials and boater education cards.  For more information about the Marine Board and its programs, visit www.boatoregon.com.

 


Public invited to ADA Anniversary Celebration on July 26 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/13/18 7:51 AM

(Salem, Ore.) — This year marks the 28th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and it is being celebrated with a day-long event in Salem on Thursday, July 26.

Presented by the Oregon Disabilities Commission, the event will feature presentations, panel discussions and other learning opportunities from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, July 26, at the Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem.

Event speeches will be from noon to 1 p.m. Featured speakers include Ted Wenk from Disability Rights Oregon and the Oregon Disabilities Commission; Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) Director Fariborz Pakseresht; Rosa Klein, Human Services Policy Advisor for Gov. Kate Brown; and many other advocates and representatives.

Leadership from DHS and the Oregon Disabilities Commission will give opening remarks at 9 a.m.

At 10:30 a.m., there is a showing of the 2011 film “Lives Worth Living.” This 60-minute documentary chronicles the disability rights movement and covers the successful efforts by people with disabilities to make changes to legislation to improve access and eventually achieve passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990.

There will be panels and sessions throughout the day, including:

  • Employment of People with Disabilities panel with representatives from Employment First, Vocational Rehabilitation, Disability Rights Oregon, Employed People with Disabilities program, and Work Incentives Planning and Assistance.
  • Oregon ABLE Savings with Oregon 529 Savings Network.
  • Day-to-Day Challenges Individuals Face Living with Disabilities, which features a number of speakers from organizations such as the Alzheimer’s Association, Salem’s Parkinson’s Support Group, Oregon Deaf & Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Council, and much more.
  • My Employment Journey session with members of the Oregon Self-Advocacy Coalition.
  • Veteran’s Employee Resource Group & Oregon Disabled Veterans Association.
  • ADA History and Advocacy.

Cake and refreshments will also be served.

More information about the Oregon Disabilities Commission is online at: https://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/ADVISORY/ODC/Pages/index.aspx

If you have questions about the celebration and program, contact: egonDisabilities.Commission@state.or.us">OregonDisabilities.Commission@state.or.us.


Governor Brown to welcome Kim Stafford, thank Elizabeth Woody at Oregon Poets Laureate Celebration July 17
Oregon Cultural Trust - 07/13/18 7:09 AM

Salem, Ore. – Governor Kate Brown will welcome newly appointed Oregon Poet Laureate Kim Stafford and thank outgoing Poet Laureate Elizabeth Woody at the Oregon Poets Laureate Celebration from 6 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, July 17, at the Rockwood Boys & Girls Club in East Portland (454 SE 165th Ave). The reception will celebrate Oregon’s Poet Laureate program, which is funded by the Oregon Cultural Trust and administered by Oregon Humanities. The event is free but registration is required by Friday, July 13.

The Oregon Poet Laureate fosters the art of poetry, encourages literacy and learning, addresses central issues relating to humanities and heritage, and reflects on public life in Oregon. The Poet Laureate provides at least six and up to 20 public readings per year in settings across the state to educate community, business and state leaders about the value and importance of poetry and creative expression. 

Stafford began a two-year term as Poet Laureate in May, succeeding Woody, who had served as Poet Laureate since April 2016. Both are committed to connecting communities through poetry. Each will read from their personal collections at the event and invite youth from the center to share their original works of spoken word. Oregon’s 2018 Poetry Out Loud champion, Sarah Calvin-Stupfel, also will be featured.

“There are many ways to serve this state and among them is clarity of language and passion of purpose, which may travel from one soul to another through poetry,” said Governor Kate Brown, who appoints the Poet Laureate. “Kim Stafford is one of our state’s most generous literary teachers and I am proud to appoint him as our next Poet Laureate.”

Stafford was born and grew up in Oregon. He is the author of a dozen books of poetry and prose, and edited half a dozen others. His book, “Having Everything Right: Essays of Place,” won a citation for excellence from the Western States Book Awards in 1986. Stafford has received creative writing fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, a Governor’s Arts Award, and the Steward Holbrook Award from Literary Arts for his contributions to Oregon’s literary culture. His work also has been featured on National Public Radio.

“Elizabeth Woody's words bring to life the landscapes, creatures and people who make Oregon special," Governor Brown added. "As Poet Laureate, the energy of her vivid storytelling helped us understand who we are as a larger community."

Woody was born on the Navajo Nation reservation in Ganado, Arizona, but has made her home in Oregon for most of her life. An enrolled member of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, she has published poetry, short fiction and essays, and also is a visual artist. “Hand Into Stone,” her first book of poetry, received a 1990 American Book Award. In 1994 she published “Luminaries of the Humble (University of Arizona Press)” and “Seven Hands, Seven Hearts (The Eighth Mountain Press).”

Past Oregon Poets Laureate were Edwin Charles Markham (1921–1940), Ben Hur Lampman (1951–1954), Ethel Romig Fuller (1957–1965), William Stafford (1974–1989), Lawson Inada (2006–2010), Paulann Petersen (2010-2014) and Peter Sears (2014-2016).

To learn more about the Oregon Poet Laureate program, or to schedule an event with Kim Stafford, visit the Poet Laureate website.

Register here by Friday, July 13, to attend the Oregon Poets Laureate Celebration.

The Cultural Trust extends its gratitude to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro, the City of Gresham and Sokol Blosser Winery for their generous support of this event.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_________________

About the Oregon Cultural Trust

The Oregon Cultural Trust is an innovative, statewide private-public program raising significant new funds to support and protect Oregon’s arts, humanities and heritage. In addition to the creation of a permanent endowment, funds are distributed annually through three multifaceted, wide-ranging grant programs. No other state in the nation has a program like the Oregon Cultural Trust, which has been ranked with the bottle bill and the vote-by-mail bill as among Oregon’s most forward-thinking public policy measures. More information at culturaltrust.org.

 

About Oregon Humanities

Oregon Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a statewide partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust. Each year through programs and publications—the Conversation Project, Think & Drink, Humanity in Perspective, Bridging Oregon, Public Program Grants, and Oregon Humanities magazine—Oregon Humanities connects Oregonians to ideas that change lives and transform communities. More information at oregonhumanities.org.

 

 


$150 million Powerball jackpot winner to be announced
Oregon Lottery - 07/13/18 4:30 AM

Lottery to hold press conference regarding claimed $150 million Powerball prize

WHO: Oregon Lottery officials

WHEN: 10 a.m., Friday, July 13, 2018

WHERE: Oregon Lottery Headquarters, 500 Airport Road SE, Salem, OR

WHAT: Oregon Lottery officials will announce the winner of the $150.4 million Powerball jackpot. An Oregon Lottery player matched all numbers drawn in the June 20th Powerball jackpot draw. The winning ticket was sold at the Circle K on Liberty St. in Salem. A Circle K representative will also be at the Friday morning event. The winner claimed the prize on Thursday and will not be at the event Friday morning.

BACKGROUND: On June 20, an Oregon Lottery player won the $150.4 million Powerball jackpot prize by matching the numbers 4-14-23-27-56 and a power ball of 13. The winning ticket, sold in Salem, was the only ticket sold to have all the winning numbers. More than 6,800 winning tickets, with smaller prizes, were sold in Oregon during the June 20 drawing.

This is the fifth time a ticket sold in Oregon has won the Powerball jackpot prize. Previous winners include Dan Gannon of Milwaukie who won $182.7 million in 2006; The West and Chaney families of Medford who won $340 million in 2005; Robin Powell of Beaverton who won $33.8 million in 1999; and the Givens family of Eugene who won $38.4 million in 1992.

Powerball is a multi-state jackpot operated by 44 states, plus the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. By pooling a portion of each lottery’s Powerball sales, this game is able to offer players jackpots of far greater value than any lottery could offer alone.

VISUALS: Oregon Lottery officials will announce the winner of the $150 million Powerball jackpot.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned over $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Serious injury crash in construction zone on Highway 97 south of Madras - Jefferson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/13/18 4:11 AM
2018-07/1002/116164/20180712_225845[1].jpg
2018-07/1002/116164/20180712_225845[1].jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1002/116164/thumb_20180712_225845[1].jpg

On July 12, 2018 at about 9:00 p.m., Troopers from the Bend Area Command responded to a three vehicle injury crash occuring on Highway 97 near milepost 101, south of Madras.  Knife River Construction is repaving this section of Highway 97 and was active in the zone when the crash occured. 

The preliminary investigation revealed that a 2006 Silver Saturn ION, operated by 23 year old Portland resident Casandra Monsivais, was traveling southbound on Highway 97 near milepost 101, and for unknown reasons, was unable to stop in time before crashing into stopped vehicles waiting for the construction zone to open to southbound traffic.  The Saturn rear ended a silver 2013 Dodge Ram truck, operated by 27 year old Spokane resident, Kelty Godby.  The impact to the Dodge then pushed it into a 2014 Subara Crosstrack, operated by 57 year old Chiloquin resident Timothy Parrish. 

The passengers of the Saturn, were identified as 20 year old Portland resident Rachel Reed and 18 year old Gresham resident Hailee Owen, and were both injured in the crash.  Reed was transported to a Bend area hospital by air ambulance for life threatening injuries and Owen was transported via ground ambulance for non-lifethreatening injuries.  The other involved occupants of the involved vehicles were all treated for minor injuries and later released.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, ODOT, Jefferson County Fire District #1 and the Knife River Construction Flagging Crew.




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1002/116164/20180712_225845[1].jpg , 2018-07/1002/116164/20180712_225913[1].jpg

Thu. 07/12/18
OHA report: OMMP needs fixes in reporting, tracking, inspections to protect patients
Oregon Health Authority - 07/12/18 3:56 PM

July 12, 2018

OHA report: OMMP needs fixes in reporting, tracking, inspections to protect patients

State medical marijuana program taking action to improve regulation

SALEM, Ore.—An internal review of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) has identified administrative shortcomings that enabled growers, dispensaries and laboratories to operate without effective oversight. It also found that statutory restrictions have limited OMMP's ability to answer information requests from local law enforcement officials, even as the program protects patient confidentiality.

The issues have heightened the risk for medical marijuana to be diverted from patients, who rely on cannabis to treat medical conditions, into the black market. The report can be viewed on the OHA website at http://healthoregon.org/ommp.

Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen requested the study in response to changing demands on OMMP in the wake of voter approval of legalized recreational marijuana sales. The agency also has heard concerns from local officials who have been frustrated as they sought information about grow operations in their communities. The report will be presented to the Oregon Cannabis Commission July 23.

"More than 40,000 Oregonians depend on medical marijuana to treat their qualifying medical conditions," Allen said. "We are taking steps to maintain the integrity of Oregon's medical marijuana program and make sure medical products reach the patients who need them. The actions we're taking include better tracking of growers, better enforcement, and making sure product that fails testing has been destroyed."

The study identifies several challenges OMMP has encountered since it was established in 1999. Some of these administrative problems existed before voters approved recreational sales in 2014. Other issues were compounded by a changing market and regulatory landscape for OMMP and medical marijuana patients once marijuana was legalized. These issues include:

  • Reporting and tracking: OMMP's reporting and tracking of growers and cannabis have been inadequate and inaccurate, and monthly compliance has been historically low, ranging between 26 percent and 42 percent during 2017.
  • Grow site validation: OMMP lacks reliable, independent tools to validate grow site addresses and relies on inconsistent county databases.
  • Grow site inspections: As of January 2018 there were more than 20,000 grow sites across the state. However, in 2017 OMMP completed only 58 inspections. OMMP does not have sufficient staff to conduct the number of inspections that would deter grower non-compliance with program requirements.
  • Laboratory testing and product destruction: While OMMP has protocols that require the destruction of products for the medical market that fail laboratory tests for pesticides and other chemicals, the program had difficulties with ensuring the appropriate and verified destruction of those products.

OMMP is taking action to improve its regulation of medical marijuana. The program is requiring dispensaries, processors and certain growers to use the Oregon Liquor Control Commission's Cannabis Tracking System (CTS). The program is ensuring that applicable growers meet new tracking requirements. In addition, OMMP will require patients to provide proof of address when processing applications, which will help validate grow site locations. As part of implementing SB 1057 (2017), OMMP will take enforcement action against participants who don't comply with reporting requirements by July 1, 2018, whether reporting in CTS or in OMMP's internal monthly reporting system. Finally, the OMMP's compliance program has finalized and started using a viable destruction protocol.

OMMP currently verifies grow site locations for local authorities and has a hotline to field grow site address inquiries. The confidentiality of grow site addresses is protected in statute and these limitations can pose a barrier to the program's ability to respond to some local law enforcement requests. In addition, the program is exploring ways to more closely work with local law enforcement to ensure compliance at medical marijuana grow sites.

The study acknowledges that OMMP successfully established and administered a program that provides more than 40,000 patients dependable access to medical cannabis and regulates more than 20,000 grow sites. In addition, frequent legislative changes have affected OMMP's ability to consistently regulate and monitor the medical marijuana market. Chronic underfunding and understaffing has affected OMMP's ability to meet the demands of robust regulation, particularly in the years immediately following the legalization of recreational sales in Oregon.

Information about the Oregon Cannabis Commission meeting is on the commission's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/CHRONICDISEASE/MEDICALMARIJUANAPROGRAM/Pages/Cannabis-Commission.aspx.

# # #


Heritage Commission to meet July 29-30 in Astoria
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/12/18 2:31 PM

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet in Astoria July 29-30. 

On July 29, Commissioners will gather at 12:30 p.m. to tour heritage efforts at the Astoria Column, Liberty Theatre, and Lewis & Clark National Park. 

On July 30, a public business meeting will begin at 9 a.m. at the Columbia River Maritime Museum conference room located at 1792 Marine Dr., Astoria 97103. The agenda includes proposals for designating Oregon Heritage Traditions, reports on commission programs, a report on the Cultural Trust Impact Study, and a proposal for FY19 Cultural Trust Funds.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For more information and accessibility needs, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Oregon Heritage Commission Coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or eth.Dehn@oregon.gov">Beth.Dehn@oregon.gov.

###


Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets July 19 in Junction City
Oregon Health Authority - 07/12/18 2:19 PM

July 12, 2018

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets July 19 in Junction City

What: Public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board

When: Thursday, July 19, 1-5 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Hospital Junction City Campus, Room A1012, 29398 Recovery Way, Junction City. The public can also attend via toll-free conference line at 888-278-0296, participant code 4294893.

Agenda: After the public comment period, topics will include patient engagement, staff training on Trauma Informed Care, Intimate Interactions Charter, veterans update, family feedback and orientation, gambling addiction, medication and discharge, medical evaluation/forensic assessment, a diversity/cultural affairs update, update from the Patient Advisory Council, access to the electronic hospital policy/procedure manual and Pow Wows.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority Director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the board’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/osh/Pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at 503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Cannabis Commission Training Subcommittee meets July 20 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 07/12/18 1:29 PM

July 12, 2018

Cannabis Commission Training Subcommittee meets July 20 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission Training Subcommittee

Agenda: The agenda will include discussion of the following topics: review minutes from May 18, 2018; Review legislative fixes; review legislative report draft 2.

When: Friday, July 20, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B (first floor), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The public also may attend by conference call line at 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, it advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.

More information on the commission's webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


DPSST Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/12/18 10:31 AM

For Immediate Release      
July 11, 2018
Contact: Staci Yutzie
503-378-2426
 
 Notice of Regular Meeting
 
The Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel for Phase 2 will hold a regular meeting on July 27, 2018 from
11:00a-2:00p.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety
Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an
interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be
made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.   
 
Agenda Items:
 
I. Welcome
 
II. Content Draft Review-
a. Legal Series
b. Mental Health Series
c. Use of Force Series
d. Defensive Tactics  
e. Firearms
f. Building Searches  

III. Development Tasks for August
IV. Conclusion

 
Administrative Announcement
This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


On-Line Video Illustrates New Communication Tool for Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Law Enforcement
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/12/18 9:26 AM

Thanks to the assistance of the City of Corvallis Police Department, Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS), and the great team at Orange Media at Oregon State University, a short on-line video was created that illustrates the new visor and wallet cards that have been made available on a statewide basis to assist with communications between individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and law enforcement officers.

The video can be found at https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/13rQRfNx1AKUAbHIKYljKzLxSFftXFTIq?usp=sharing

The wallet and visor cards were created through a partnership between the Oregon Association for the Deaf (OAD), the Public Safety Subcommittee of the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee (ODHHS), and the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) . 

The cards, released two months ago, are being distributed by the Oregon Association for the Deaf, and their local and regional partners; the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Program; local law enforcement agencies; and other organizations that work with deaf and hard of hearing Oregonians.

The on-going partnership between the three organizations, OAD, ODHHS and DPSST, has resulted in an update to the basic police curriculum used to train new law enforcement officers, and also deaf and hard of hearing role players who participate in scenario-based training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem.

DPSST’s Director Eriks Gabliks said “we are very proud of the partnership we have with the Oregon Association for the Deaf, the Public Safety Subcommittee of the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS), and ODHHS.  Sadly, we know there have been some tragic interactions around the nation involving law enforcement officers and individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.  The visor and wallet cards were designed to serve as a tool to assist with communications between individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and city, county, state, tribal and university law enforcement officers around Oregon.”

Past President of OAD and current state employee with ODHHS, Chad A. Ludwig said “it take a village’s effort to promote public safety, awareness, and communication. The goal for two-sided visor and wallet communication card to minimize the barrier in the field and allow each member involved in any type of legal related incidents to build rapport. The communication card is not intended to replace trained, certified and qualified sign language interpreters in the legal system. This move is a positive step that improves safety for individuals who are Deaf, Deaf-Blind, Hard of Hearing and those with additional disability as well as law enforcement partners across Oregon.”

DPSST's Director Eriks Gabliks said "the video produced by the Corvallis Police Department, Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS), and the team at Orange Media at Oregon State University gives a realist view of how communications between those who are deaf or hard of hearing and law enforcement are improved by the new wallet and visor cards. We are very appreciative of the work that was done to create this video and are glad to be a partner in the creation of this important communications tool."

Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services

http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/BUSINESS-SERVICES/ODHHS/Pages/index.aspx

Oregon Association for the Deaf

http://www.OAD1921.org

Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training

http://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/Pages/index.aspx

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.




Attached Media Files: Visor Card , Visor Card

State fire marshal urges vigilance and extreme care against wildfires
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/12/18 9:22 AM

Oregon State Fire Marshal Jim Walker is encouraging Oregonians to use extreme caution as intense heat and dry thunderstorms are predicted for areas around the state for the next few days. 

If your summer plans include camping, Chief Walker reminds you to check for any campfire restrictions in the area you will be visiting, as campfires may be prohibited outside maintained campgrounds with fire pits. Build your campfire only where authorized and never leave your campfire unattended. When putting out your campfire be sure you drown the coals with water, stir with a shovel and drown again until it is cool to the touch.

Fire season requires residents to be at a heightened awareness for the dangers of wildfire. Be prepared to act to keep you, your family, and pets safe.  Follow these Ready, Set Go! tips:

  • Be Ready - Plan escape routes, and make sure all the residents within the home know the plan of action.  Be ready to evacuate any pets as well as family members.
  • Get Set – Pack your emergency items such as a battery powered radio, spare batteries, emergency contact numbers, and ample drinking water. Stay aware of the latest news and information on the fire in your area from local media, your local fire department and public safety.
  • Go! – If a fire impacts your community and you are asked to leave, follow your personal wildland fire action plan. Doing so will not only support your safety, but will allow firefighters to best maneuver resources to combat the fire.

“It’s everyone’s responsibility to help prevent human-caused wildfires,” said Chief Walker. “Please be aware of weather conditions and fire restrictions in your area.”  

Residents are strongly encouraged to contact their local fire protection agencies for additional burning information and regulations.

For more information, visit the websites for OSFM Wildland Urban Interface, Keep Oregon Green, or Oregon Department of Forestry


Trusted Tester Program Comes To Coffee Creek Correctional Facility
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/12/18 8:59 AM

In May, Oregon Correctional Enterprises (OCE) announced the successful startup of a new work program for incarcerated women at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF). Five women completed months of rigorous training and testing to become Trusted Testers certified by the Office of Accessibility Systems and Technology under the Department of Homeland Security. The graduation ceremony is July 26 at 10:30 a.m. at CCCF.

Through OCE’s partnership with Access2online, the company which operates the work and training program inside CCCF, these five women are now qualified to test websites (in an offline environment) for accessibility to the visually impaired. Their expertise joins the national effort to allow the visually impaired to benefit from the internet that has become an essential part of life in most of the world.

While the Access2online program is relatively new to the prison environment, it is already supporting successful transition from incarceration into Oregon communities. Upon release from prison, the first two participants in the program had jobs waiting for them with the Access2online corporate office. Ninety-five percent of the men and women incarcerated in Oregon’s prisons will ultimately release from Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) custody; plans to grow the Access2online program include training and employing additional women at CCCF as well as the addition of satellite programs at other Oregon institutions.

Those releasing from incarceration are discovering how essential the internet is for everyday life in the United States. Most job applications, information about public services, and even grocery orders can be processed online; but many adults in custody have never touched a computer, let alone surfed the web. While American prisons do not allow those in our care to have unfettered access to the internet, most states, including Oregon, have developed offline environments or secure, direct portals to specific sites which allow for education, training, and production. Industry-recognized certifications are difficult for those in custody to obtain because most testing is done online, but the recent partnership with DOC, OCE, Access2online, and the Department of Homeland Security is evidence that difficult does not mean impossible.

Oregon Corrections Enterprises (OCE) is a semi-independent, self-funded state agency which operates under the Director of Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC). Created by statute in 1999 to help DOC meet its constitutional mandate to engage adults in custody (AICs) in meaningful work and training opportunities, OCE currently operates various production and service programs in 10 DOC facilities. While primarily teaching work skills to prepare over 1300 AICs for successful re-entry into Oregon communities, OCE’s programs also keep the AICs engaged in activity, thus reducing idleness that can lead to types of behavior which affect the safety and security of the institutions.


Josephine County man Kills ex-girlfriend and then takes his own life - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 07/12/18 8:48 AM

On July 11, 2018 at approximately 11:00PM, Oregon State Troopers responded to a domestic disturbance at an address in the Merlin area. When Troopers arrived they located a passenger van in the driveway and the female operator was deceased. Approximately 1 mile from this scene a second vehicle was located and the male driver was pronounced deceased from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot. The investigation has determined that the male had confronted the female, killing her and then took his own life.  

The names will be released at a later time once the families have been notified. No other information is available at this time.


Wed. 07/11/18
Recreational use health advisory for Lake Billy Chinook expanded to include entire lake
Oregon Health Authority - 07/11/18 4:57 PM

July 11, 2018

Recreational use health advisory for Lake Billy Chinook expanded to include entire lake

The Oregon Health Authority has updated a recreational use health advisory issued June 22 for Lake Billy Chinook.

The original advisory extended from the cove at Perry South Campground to the southern tip of Chinook Island due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom and the toxins they can produce. Based on the most recent data available to the Oregon Health Authority from other areas of the lake, the advisory is being expanded to include all three arms of Lake Billy Chinook. The lake is located about 12 miles west of Madras in Jefferson County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of cyanobacteria and the toxins they produce in the Metolius, Deschutes and Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook. The cyanotoxin concentrations found can be harmful to humans and animals.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities such as water skiing or power boating in areas of the lake where cyanotoxins are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from this area of the lake at this time is especially dangerous. OHA public health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters.

There are no public systems that use water from Lake Billy Chinook for drinking water; however, anyone who may be drawing in-home water directly from the lake is advised to use an alternate water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing cyanotoxins. Individuals on a domestic well should not be affected by the bloom or toxins. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds and parks, they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Lake Billy Chinook and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to cyanotoxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to Lake Billy Chinook for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the lake.

The advisory will be lifted when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid exposure to affected water, people are encouraged to visit this area of Lake Billy Chinook and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “algae bloom advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

# # #


2018 Veteran Benefit Expo to be held in southern Oregon for the first time (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 07/11/18 11:05 AM
The 2017 Expo, held at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds in Redmond, drew over 575 attendees.
The 2017 Expo, held at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds in Redmond, drew over 575 attendees.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1082/116093/thumb_20170715_104624(0).jpg

The state’s largest veteran resource event will be held in southern Oregon this month, when the Veteran Benefit Expo kicks off at 9 a.m. July 28 at the Medford Armory, 1701 S. Pacific Highway in Medford.

With over 65 booths featuring state and federal service providers, nonprofit agencies, employers and other local partners, this free event promises to bring together the best benefits, resources and programs Oregon has to offer veterans and their families.

The annual Expo is organized by the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs and is hosted in different locations throughout the state.

“The Veteran Benefit Expo was created with the intention of going to a new location each year, and it’s our privilege to bring it to southern Oregon for the first time this summer,” said ODVA Acting Director Mitch Sparks. “The southern Oregon veteran community has an incredible network of dedicated service officers and resource providers, and we’re honored to be able to join in and do what we can to support that great work.”

The Expo offers resources from many different benefit areas, including health care, claims assistance, finance, home loans, long-term care, mental health, education, business and recreation. The event will also include a Veteran Career Fair and Veteran Trade Show, showcasing veteran-owned businesses and entrepreneurs. 

This year’s event is being presented in partnership with Oregon Lottery, a longtime supporter of causes important to Oregonians, including public education, the environment and the veteran community.

Space is limited, but there are still openings for employers interested in participating in the career fair or for veteran-owned businesses interested in the trade show. Please contact Tyler Francke at 503-373-2389 or .francke@state.or.us">tyler.francke@state.or.us for more information.

For more information about the Expo, visit www.expo.oregondva.com.  




Attached Media Files: The 2017 Expo, held at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds in Redmond, drew over 575 attendees.

OSP Detectives make an arrest after credible threat investigation (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/11/18 7:45 AM
2018-07/1002/116081/Oregon_State_Police.JPG
2018-07/1002/116081/Oregon_State_Police.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1002/116081/thumb_Oregon_State_Police.JPG

On Tuesday July 10, 2018, at 9:01am, an email was sent to the Oregon Lottery Headquarters Office in Salem.  The email contained an imminent threat to shoot and kill people at the Lottery Office.  OSP Gaming Enforcement Detectives along with Major Crimes Detectives began investigating the threat.  

At about 2:30pm, Major Crimes Detectives arrested Jason David Ouellette (42-years-old) from Lebanon, Or. for menacing.  Ouellette was lodged at the Marion County Jail without incident.

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1002/116081/Oregon_State_Police.JPG

Tue. 07/10/18
Corrections Deputies and Officers to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/10/18 2:20 PM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of Basic Corrections Local #BCL032 on Friday July 20, 2018 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. 

We would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Corrections #BCL032 on their successful completion of basic training. 

The event will begin at 11 am with a reception to follow after the ceremony.  Sheriff Shane Nelson of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office will be the guest speaker.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Members of Graduating Class BCL032:

Deputy Sheriff Daniel Barker

Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Isaac Booker

Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Amber Christensen

Jefferson County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Michael Cowan

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Jeremiah Feland

Douglas County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Katheryn Fowlds

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Paul Garcia

Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Emma Grotefend

Lane County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Daniel Guzman-Catarina

Washington County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Kyle Hanna

Lane County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Justen Jump

Columbia County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Abraham Kapua

Clatsop County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Andrew Krafve

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Hillary Langdon

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Leah Moore

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Amyr Motlagh

Lane County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Jessica Myers

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Marcos Ordaz-Munoz

Washington County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Katie Peters

Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Andreas Pherigo

Washington County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Robert Quilantan

 Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Sergio Quintero

Josephine County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Kyle Rayborn

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Robbins

Columbia County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Jacob Rorem

Polk County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Devon Ross

Coos County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Andrew Scherbarth

Curry County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Neil Schweitz

Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

 

Corrections Officer Matthew Spivey

Washington County Community Corrections

 

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Stobbe

Columbia County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff William Strubel

Lane County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Joel Teixeira

Baker County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Krystle Toribio

Coos County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Lyndsey Wallace

Marion County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Terrance Watters

Tillamook County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Kevin Weitzel

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Connor West-Santini

Lane County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff William Wetherell

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office      

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Free Youth 3-on-3 Basketball Skill Development Clinics
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 07/10/18 1:53 PM

WALLA WALLA – The Walla Walla High School Boys and Girls Basketball Program is teaming with the newly formed Walla Walla Basketball Club (Walla2Hoops) to offer 3-on-3 Skill Development Clinics this summer for boys and girls in grades 4-8.

Walla Walla High School coaches and players will partner with Stephen Garnett of Overtime Training (OTT) to lead these free sessions open to youth throughout the Walla Walla valley. Students will learn basketball fundamentals, including ball handling, shooting and passing techniques. Participants will also learn strategies for success in 3-on-3 tournaments. This is an excellent opportunity to tune-up and get ready for Peach Basket.

“These clinics are a great way for our new AAU basketball club to get exposure and allow our youngest basketball players to be around their Blue Devil heroes,” said Matt Price-Huntington, president of the Walla Walla Basketball Club. “We are developing a scope and sequence for every grade level and this summer program is an opportunity to begin the process of getting our players ready for competition.”

Clinic Schedule:

July 10, July 12, July 17, July 19 @ Garrison Middle School from 6 to 8 p.m.

July 24, July 26, July 31, Aug 2 @ Wa-Hi Main Gym from 6 to 8 p.m.

 

FREE - Sign Up on FamilyID

For information on the Walla Walla Basketball Club:

###


DPSST Rulemaking (OAR) Hearing Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/10/18 1:28 PM

For Immediate Release                                          

July 9, 2018

Contact:              Jennifer Howald
                              503-378-2432

Notice of a Rulemaking (OAR) Hearing

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) will hold a Rulemaking Hearing for proposed changes to Private Security OARs 259-060-0010, 259-060-0060, 259-060-0120, 259-060-0135 and 259-060-0300. The public rulemaking hearing will be held on Monday, July 16, 2018 from 2:00-3:00 PM at DPSST. DPSST is located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem OR 97317.

The public rulemaking hearing is an opportunity for interested persons to submit comments related to the rule changes in person. Comments submitted at the public rulemaking hearing may be verbal or written.  A brief question and answer session will be offered prior to the start of the comment opportunity.

Rule Filing Caption: Emergency suspension for failed firearms courses/qualifications; Changes due dates for annual firearms courses/qualifications.

The proposed rule change and the rulemaking hearing have been noticed through the Secretary of State. A copy of the notices, a summary of the rule change and the proposed rule changes are available on the DPSST website at https://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/SC/Pages/ProposedRulesPublicComment.aspx .

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the rulemaking hearing officer at 503-378-2432.

The rulemaking hearing is a public meeting subject to public meeting law. The rulemaking hearing will be digitally recorded and will be administered in accordance with OAR 137-001-0030.


Oregon health officials caution people about high temperatures
Oregon Health Authority - 07/10/18 1:19 PM

Editors: Tom Jeanne, MD, will be available for interviews from 2 to 4 p.m. today. Contact Delia Hernandez at 503-422-7179 to schedule.

July 10, 2018

Oregon health officials caution people about high temperatures

Stay hydrated, limit sun exposure as forecast calls for upper 90s

Oregon health officials are recommending people prevent heat-related illnesses that can lead to heat exhaustion and heat stroke as summer temperatures climb into at least the mid-90s in the coming days.

"We love our Oregon summers and the warm temperatures they bring, but people need to take precautions when temperatures get to the level where they can cause health problems," said Tom Jeanne, MD, deputy state health officer at the OHA Public Health Division. "Extreme heat conditions can even be deadly for some people."

According to the National Weather Service, temperatures are expected to reach the mid- to upper 90s Thursday in the Portland metro area and central Oregon, and above 100 in parts of eastern and southern Oregon.

The Oregon Public Health Division offers the following tips for staying safe and healthy during extreme heat conditions:

1. Stay cool

  • Stay in air-conditioned places when temperatures are high, if possible.
  • Limit exposure to the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when UV rays are strongest. Try to schedule activities in the morning and evening.
  • Open windows to allow fresh air to circulate, especially during morning and evening hours, and close shades on west-facing windows during the afternoon hours.
  • Use portable electric fans to exhaust hot air from rooms or draw in cooler air.
  • Wear loose-fitting clothing to keep cool and protect your skin from the sun.
  • Use cool compresses, misting, and cool showers and baths.
  • Avoid hot foods and heavy meals; they add heat to the body.
  • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. Nor should pets be left in parked cars—they can suffer heat-related illness, too.
  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Use sunscreen with at least SPF 15 when going outside.

2. Stay hydrated

  • Regardless of your level of activity, drink plenty of fluids, even if you are not thirsty and especially when working outside.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.

3. Stay informed

  • Keep up-to-date on the temperature and heat index when planning your activities so you can find ways to stay cool and hydrated. The heat index measures how hot it feels outside when factoring in humidity with the actual air temperature.
  • Learn how to prevent, recognize, and treat heat-related illnesses. Know the warning signs of heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, sunburn and heat rash, and how to treat and prevent them.

People with a chronic medical condition such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer or kidney disease may be less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category should be closely monitored to make sure they’re drinking enough water, have access to air conditioning and know how to keep cool.

Those who exercise in extreme heat or work outdoors are more likely to become dehydrated and get heat-related illness and should pay particular attention to staying as cool and hydrated as possible.

For more information, visit:

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DPSST Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/10/18 1:11 PM

For Immediate Release                                          

June 9, 2018

Contact: Mona Riesterer
                (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on August 1, 2018.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities.  A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Minutes of May 2, 2018 Meeting   

Approve Minutes of May 2, 2018 Meeting

3.  Administrative Closures – Telecommunicator/Emergency Medical Dispatcher

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

4.  Thornton, Cory DPSST#53006 – Basic Telecommunications & Emergency Medical Dispatch Certification

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

5.  Stolt, Jennifer DPSST#42217 – Basic Telecommunicator & Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications: Junction City Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

6.  Staff Update

7.  Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting November 7, 2018
Wednesday, November 7, 2018, at 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Telecommunications Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Kiona - Benton City School Board Meeting rescheduled to July 30th at 7:00 PM in the Board room.
Kiona-Benton City Sch. Dist. - 07/10/18 12:00 PM

Kiona - Benton City School Board has rescheduled the July 16th meeting to July 30th at 7:00 PM in the Board room. 


DPSST Telecommunications Curriculum Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/10/18 11:45 AM

For Immediate Release                                          

July 10, 2018

Contact:              Sara Stewart     
                              503-378-2424

Notice of Regular Meeting

 

The Basic Telecommunications Curriculum Committee will hold a regular curriculum meeting at 10:00-15:00 on July 12, 2018.  The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at DPSST. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

Evaluation / Assessment of Academy

  • Proposal Review
  • Needs of Agencies
  • Options for New Academy

Establish Critical Criteria for Academy

  • Outcomes
  • Failure vs. Remediation
  • Proficiency

Next in Development Process

  • Scenario Development – start NOW

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Basic Telecommunications Curriculum Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Health Care Workforce Committee meet July 11 in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 07/10/18 11:12 AM

July 10, 2018

Contact: Melisa Otrugman, 503-689-5238, ugman@state.or.us">melisa.z.otrugman@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Care Workforce Committee meet July 11 in Wilsonville

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee

When: Wednesday, July 11, 9:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Public testimony will be heard from 12:15 to 12:30 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 111-112, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees can also follow the presentation by webinar and listen to discussion by telephone. Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/13920203482029571. Conference line: 877-411-9748, access code 730407. The telephone will be unmuted during public testimony.

Agenda: Approval of July Meeting Summary, OHPB and OHA updates, CCO 2.0 update and discussion, presentation on Oregon’s health care workforce labor market data, behavioral health updates, recommendations on promising strategies to improve the diversity of the workforce, Health Care Workforce Needs Assessment 2.0, Health Care Provider Incentive Program update, public comment

For more information, please visit the committee’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP-HCW/Pages/Meetings.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Melisa Otrugman at 503-689-5238, 711 TTY, ugman@state.or.us">melisa.z.otrugman@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #


Board of Forestry will meet July 24 in Salem, State Forests and Agency Budget top agenda
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/10/18 11:00 AM

Date:  July 10, 2018

Contact:  Megan Ehnle, Board of Forestry Executive Support, 503-302-5603

 

Salem, Ore. – Among the agenda items for the Oregon Board of Forestry’s July 24 regular meeting will be consideration of guiding principles for revising the State Forests Management Plan and the Agency Request Budget. The meeting will begin at 9 a.m., and go through approximately 5:00 p.m., with an Executive Session planned for the lunch hour.

The meeting will be held in the Tillamook Room, Administration Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St., in Salem. The meeting is open to the public and public comment will be accepted on agenda topics as well as during the start of the meeting for topics not on the agenda. In order to ensure the Board has the opportunity to conduct all of the business on the agenda for its meetings, public comment for agenda topics will be limited to no more than 30 minutes. A sign-up sheet will be available for public comment on a first-come, first-served basis. Submission of written comments ahead of board meetings is encouraged. Written comments may be submitted prior to the meeting to: Boardofforestry@oregon.gov.

State Forests Management Plans establish the goals and direction to manage state forests, which are sustainably managed to provide environmental, social and economic benefits to all Oregonians. The board will be considering guiding principles for the revision of the FMP, the inclusion of measureable outcomes and quantifiable targets, and an impacts analysis framework. Information regarding the Forest Management Plan revision will be posted at: https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/Initiatives.aspx.

The staff presentation on the topic is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m. Following the staff presentation, the board has scheduled 15 minutes of invited testimony from both the conservation community and the forest industries sector, followed by public comment as described above.

The board will also consider the approval of the Agency Request Budget and its submission to the Department of Administrative Services. The ARB is part of the planning and development process for the next biennial budget. The recommendation for approval follows and builds upon the Board’s previous budget discussions and deliberations since early 2018.

Other agenda items for the meeting include:

  • Tillamook Forest Heritage Trust – Overviewing the trust’s organization, programs, and strategic direction, including an update on the status of the Salmonberry Trail.
  • Committee for Family Forestlands Annual Report – Summarizing the committee’s activities during the previous year, progress on key issues, and recommendations relating to policy affecting family forestland owners.
  • 2018 Fire Season Update
  • Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee testimony – FTLAC comments and advice on State Forests policy.
  • Forest Patrol Assessment Hearings – Hearings before the Board for landowners in Yamhill and Lane counties who have appealed their addition to the forest patrol assessment roll.

Agenda materials are available at www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx. Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office, at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting, at 503-945-7200.

###

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/AboutBOF.aspx


DOGAMI Governing Board to meet July 17 in Newport
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 07/10/18 10:34 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet on Tuesday, July 17 at 7:30 a.m. at the parking lot outside the Guin Library, Hatfield Marine Science Center, Newport, Oregon for a tour of Newport sites. Members of the public may participate in the tour but must provide their own transportation. The regular public portion of the governing board agenda will start at approximately 11:00 a.m. in the Hatfield Marine Science Center Library Seminar Room.

The meeting agenda is available at www.OregonGeology.org.

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years. The Board meets at least quarterly. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.

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BREAKING: Oregon Farm Bureau statement on Hammonds pardon
Oregon Farm Bureau - 07/10/18 10:28 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 10, 2018, SALEM, OREGON: Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) thanks the president, Congressman Walden, and all of those who worked to end the injustice done to Steven and Dwight Hammond by granting them clemency. While nobody can restore what they’ve lost to this prosecutorial overreach and bureaucratic vendetta, we are happy that this awful chapter will be coming to a close soon.

OFB has publicly advocated for the Hammonds, including gathering over 25,000 online signatures, and also supported clemency through officials in Oregon and Washington, D.C.

OFB President Barry Bushue said, “Our thoughts and prayers are with Steven and Dwight as they get back to the people and the land they love. We will continue to do whatever we can to ensure that this injustice is never repeated.”  

The federal judge who heard the Hammonds’ case, Michael Hogan, said in his ruling that a five-year prison sentence is “grossly disproportionate to the severity of [petitioners’] offenses.” He added that it does “not meet any idea I have of justice, proportionately” and “would shock the conscience to me.” Hogan also noted that the 1996 Anti-Terrorism & Effective Death Penalty Act was never meant to apply to ranchers simply trying to protect their land.

We agree.

###


Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has nearly 7,000 farm and ranch family members.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue is a third-generation farmer raising pumpkins, u-pick produce, and flowering baskets at a nearly century-old farm near Boring. He is OFB’s 15th president.


Renewing Community with Green Projects
Pacific Power - 07/10/18 10:27 AM

Media Contact:                                                               FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Tom Gauntt, Pacific Power                                                                        July 10, 2018      

503-813-7291                                                          

                                                                       

Renewing Community with Green Projects
Deadline is Aug.17 for getting your community’s project considered

PORTLAND, Ore. — Pacific Power’s Blue Sky program is accepting funding applications for renewable energy projects through Aug. 17, 2018.

The program, funded by more than 60,000 Blue Sky customers, is available to help cover the cost of installing renewable energy systems for non-residential, community-serving organizations within the Pacific Power service area. Those systems include solar, wind, geothermal and other forms of renewable energy.

Blue Sky provides an easy and convenient way for customers to support the development of renewable energy resources in the western United States, starting for as little as $1.95 per month.

Since 2006, the Blue Sky program has assisted 105 renewable energy projects across California, Oregon and Washington go live.

You can view a full list of community projects that have received funding regionally, statewide and close to home.

Applicants must submit a completed application form along with supporting materials by 5 p.m. on Aug. 17, 2018. Successful applicants will be notified by February 2019. Learn more on Pacific Power’s Blue Sky website or contact the program management with any questions at luesky@pacificorp.com">bluesky@pacificorp.com.

In addition to funding from the Pacific Power Blue Sky grant, applicants may also be eligible to receive Energy Trust of Oregon cash incentives for qualifying solar projects. For more information contact a qualifying solar trade ally contractor (energytrust.org/programs/solar/) or contact Energy Trust at solar@energytrust.org

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About Blue Sky
The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has ranked Blue Sky fifth or better in the nation for the 13th consecutive year in the number of customers buying renewable power. The Blue Sky Block, Usage and Habitat products are Green-e Energy certified; More than 60,000 Pacific Power customers currently participate in the Blue Sky program across Oregon, Washington and California. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/bluesky.

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to nearly 750,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. Our goal is to provide our customers with value for their energy dollar, and safe, reliable electricity. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states.

 


FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Tech Support Fraud (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 07/10/18 10:00 AM
TT - Tech Support Fraud update - tips
TT - Tech Support Fraud update - tips
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/3585/115414/thumb_TT_-_Tech_Support_Fraud_update_tips.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against tech support fraud.

Recently we talked about the dangers that come with people offering you tech support for your computer, phone or other device. This is a scam in which the fraudster tries to convince you that you need his help fixing a usually non-existent problem. In the end, he gets access to all of your personal information and online accounts, and you get nothing but grief.

Since we did that original report, we’ve received new information about how these fraudsters are targeting victims: through social media posts.

For example, one victim said she was having trouble with her computer and posted a question on the computer manufacturer’s Facebook page. Soon thereafter, she received a call from a man identifying himself as a tech support employee for that company. She gave him remote access to her computer, and that’s where the real trouble started.

He claimed her problem was with software on the computer, and he would just need a small payment to update her system. She tried to make the payment with a debit card, but he said that card didn’t work, and he would need a credit card instead. He later had her log into the family’s second computer as well so he could allegedly show her how to remove viruses herself in the future.

By the end of the encounter, the fake tech support worker had tried to charge several thousand dollars to her credit card. It also appeared as if he had accessed her email, her bill pay system and her PayPal account while he had control of her computer. In addition, he opened a Western Union account in an attempt to send multiple wire transfers. He may have also had access to more personal information – including her Social Security number – via the tax returns that were stored on the computer.

So how do you keep yourself – and your device – safe?

  • Don’t post personal information – including your phone number or email address – on a public website or social media platform. If you need help with a problem on your device, contact the company in question directly.
  • Remember that legitimate customer, security, or tech support companies will not initiate unsolicited contact with you.
  • Do not give unknown, unverified people remote access to devices or accounts.
  • Ensure all computer anti-virus, security and malware protection is up to date.

If you have been victimized by an online scam or any other cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

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Attached Media Files: TT - Tech Support update - Audio , TT - Tech Support Fraud update - tips

BREAKING: Oregon Farm Bureau statement on Hammonds pardon
Oregon Farm Bureau - 07/10/18 7:31 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 10, 2018, SALEM, OREGON: Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) thanks the president, Congressman Walden, and all of those who worked to end the injustice done to Steven and Dwight Hammond by granting them clemency. While nobody can restore what they’ve lost to this prosecutorial overreach and bureaucratic vendetta, we are happy that this awful chapter will be coming to a close soon.

OFB has publicly advocated for the Hammonds, including gathering over 25,000 online signatures, and also supported clemency through officials in Oregon and Washington, D.C.

OFB President Barry Bushue said, “Our thoughts and prayers are with Steven and Dwight as they get back to the people and the land they love. We will continue to do whatever we can to ensure that this injustice is never repeated.”  

The federal judge who heard the Hammonds’ case, Michael Hogan, said in his ruling that a five-year prison sentence is “grossly disproportionate to the severity of [petitioners’] offenses.” He added that it does “not meet any idea I have of justice, proportionately” and “would shock the conscious to me.” Hogan also noted that the 1996 Anti-Terrorism & Effective Death Penalty Act was never meant to apply to ranchers simply trying to protect their land.

We agree.

[See statement online: http://bit.ly/2tRQaG5] 

###


Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has nearly 7,000 farm and ranch family members.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue is a third-generation farmer raising pumpkins, u-pick produce, and flowering baskets at a nearly century-old farm near Boring. He is OFB’s 15th president.


Mon. 07/09/18
Conference of Local Health Officials meets July 19 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 07/09/18 4:28 PM

July 9, 2018 

Conference of Local Health Officials meets July 19 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO)

When: Thursday, July 19, 9:30-11:30 a.m. The meeting is open to the public. No conference call option is available for the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland

Agenda: Prevention and health promotion committee update; assessment of new CLHO committee structure; and Public Health Modernization Legislative Fiscal Office report.

Agenda is subject to change. The meeting agenda and related materials will be posted on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/about/clho-meetings/.

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340).

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 971-673-1223, 711 TTY or um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


See3Slam Basketball Tournament this Weekend in Richland (Photo)
City of Richland - 07/09/18 2:42 PM
2018-07/5957/116034/See3Slam_Flier_2018_vertical_V1._NEW_CAR.jpg
2018-07/5957/116034/See3Slam_Flier_2018_vertical_V1._NEW_CAR.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/5957/116034/thumb_See3Slam_Flier_2018_vertical_V1._NEW_CAR.jpg

-Event includes a movie, concert, vendors and a road closure  

The third annual See3Slam 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament is happening in Richland on Saturday and Sunday, July 14 & 15 but the pre-festivities begin Friday, July 13. George Washington Way, near John Dam Plaza will close to traffic beginning Friday at 6:00 p.m. to Sunday at 6:00 p.m. for this family friendly, two-day extravaganza.  

Motor vehicles traveling on George Washington Way, from Lee Boulevard north to Swift Boulevard will be directed to nearby Jadwin Avenue. The parking lot off Knight Street at John Dam Plaza will also be closed.  Event participants are encouraged to park at Richland City Hall, the Federal Building Parking lot or the parking lot on Lee and Jadwin. 

The tournament, which has 255+ teams registered, takes place on Saturday and Sunday at 8:00 a.m. on George Washington Way in Central Richland. While this stretch of roadway will be closed to through traffic, businesses will remain open and can be accessed from Newton Street and Lee Boulevard.

On Friday, food vendors will open in John Dam Plaza and the movie “Space Jam,” rated PG, will play on an inflatable screen at dusk. On Saturday and Sunday, the fun begins with a pancake breakfast from 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. and on Saturday evening, a Pink Floyd tribute band will play from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

More information can be found at www.see3slam.com.




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/5957/116034/See3Slam_Flier_2018_vertical_V1._NEW_CAR.jpg

Seismic Retrofit Classes Help Oregonians Prepare for Earthquakes
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 07/09/18 2:05 PM

Information and training sessions on seismic retrofits are scheduled for Baker City and Bend. 

For building owners, building officials, home inspectors, design professionals, home builders, emergency planners, insurers and lenders: FEMA P-50 and FEMA P-50-1, Simplified Seismic Assessment and Retrofit Guidelines for Detached, Single-Family, Wood-Frame Dwellings

This course presents training on the FEMA P-50 and P-50-1 documents, addressing seismic assessment and retrofit of detached single-family wood-frame dwellings. These documents update and expand to national basis the simplified assessment methodology and retrofit guidelines originally developed for use in the City of Los Angeles following the Northridge earthquake (ATC-50 and ATC-50-1). 

BAKER CITY:
When: 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Thursday, July 12, 2018
Location: Blue Mountain Community College, 3275 Baker Street, Baker City, OR 97814
Registration: https://fema-p50-baker-city.eventbrite.com/

BEND:
When: 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Friday, July 13, 2018
Location: Central Oregon Community College Health Careers Center, Room 140, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97703
Registration: https://fema-p50-bend.eventbrite.com/

The Bend event will also offer a session for homeowners: Will your house stand up to the shaking during Cascadia? A panel of experts offers information on the impact of earthquakes, how to get a home retrofitted, and how to find a contractor who can do seismic retrofits.

When: 6 – 8 p.m., Friday, July 13, 2018 
Location: Central Oregon Community College Health Careers Center, Room 140, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97703
Registration: https://fema-p50-bend.eventbrite.com/

For questions or additional information, please contact Althea Rizzo, izzo@state.or.us?subject=RE:%20">althea.rizzo@state.or.us.


Oregon Department of Human Services to host Quarterly Stakeholder Meeting on July 16 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/09/18 1:27 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) Director Fariborz Pakseresht and the Department’s Executive Team will present a brief program followed by a question-and-answer period.

Join in person, by phone or follow along on Facebook or Twitter.

Participants will hear an agency-wide update from Director Pakseresht and brief presentations from the directors of each program division with DHS, including Aging and People with Disabilities, Child Welfare, the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services, Self-Sufficiency Programs and Vocational Rehabilitation.

When:  Monday, July 16, 2018, 1:30-3 p.m.

In-person:  Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 137, 500 Summer Street NE, Salem

By phone:  Take part by conference call (866) 233-3841; Participant Code: 451371

Live stream:  Watch the live stream on social media and participate in the conversation by using #ORDHSforum:

  • Twitter: @OregonDHSAPD
  • Facebook: @OregonDHS.SSP

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Warm Springs Man Sentenced to 25 Years in Federal Prison for Molesting Minor Victim
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/09/18 12:38 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Lawren John Slockish, 36, of Warm Springs, Oregon, was sentenced today to 300 months in federal prison for molesting an 11-year-old girl.

“Sexual abuse of children casts a lifelong shadow on the health of the victims. The Warm Springs Multi-Disciplinary Child Abuse Team brings together tribal police and prosecutors, Child Protective Services, the Indian Health Service, and federal law enforcement authorities to collaboratively investigate these cases in a thorough, compassionate manner ensuring justice for these vulnerable victims” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

“This victim showed great courage by coming forward to disclose the abuse, and for that we are very grateful. Her strength will allow us - law enforcement, the community and her family - to keep other children safe,” said Steve Goldman, Assistant Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “The FBI, working with our tribal partners, will do everything to bring justice for the victim with a long-term goal of identifying and addressing child sexual abuse within our community.”

According to court documents, both Slockish and the minor victim are members of the Warm Springs Tribe. One day following the abuse, the child disclosed to her mother that Slockish had touched her breasts and tried to anally sodomize her. The minor victim’s mother notified the Warm Springs police. The child told Warm Springs police officers that the assault was not the first time the defendant had molested her and that he had done so in a similar manner approximately one year prior.

Slockish previously pleaded guilty to one count of abusive sexual contact with a child on January 19, 2017. Upon completion of his prison sentence, Slockish will be on supervised release for life.

The FBI investigated this case with the assistance of the Warm Springs Tribal Police Department. It was prosecuted by Paul T. Maloney, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

On March 3, 1994, the FBI initiated “Operation Safe Trails” with the Navajo Department of Law Enforcement in Flagstaff, Arizona. The operation, which would later evolve into the Safe Trails Task Force (STTF) Program, unites FBI and other federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies in a collaborative effort to combat the growth of crime in Indian Country. STTFs allow participating agencies to combine limited resources and increase investigative coordination in Indian Country to target violent crime, drugs, gangs, and gaming violations.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/6325/116025/SENTENCING-Slockish-Final.pdf

Prevent heat illness for workers in hot weather
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/09/18 11:36 AM

(Salem) – As summer temperatures rise, so do the dangers of working in high heat. That’s especially true in Oregon, where workers tend to be used to working in mild weather and are frequently not accustomed to high temperatures.

As a result, Oregon OSHA encourages employers and workers in construction, agriculture, and other labor-intensive activities to learn the signs of heat illness and focus on prevention.

“Prevention really comes down to taking several important precautions,” said Penny Wolf-McCormick, health enforcement manager for Oregon OSHA. “They include regularly providing water, rest, and shade; gradually adapting workers to hot environments; and training employees to recognize signs of trouble and to speak up about them.”

Exposure to heat can lead to headaches, cramps, dizziness, fatigue, nausea or vomiting, and even seizures or death. From 2012 to 2017, 37 people received benefits through Oregon’s workers’ compensation system for heat-related illnesses.

The call to address the hazards of working in high heat is part of a larger effort aimed at preventing heat-related illness. Under an emphasis program run by Oregon OSHA, the agency’s enforcement and consultation activities will include a review of employers’ plans to deal with heat exposure, especially from June 15 through Oct. 1 of each year.

The prevention program applies to both outdoor job sites and indoor workplaces where potential heat-related hazards may exist. Oregon OSHA encourages employers to fill out a heat illness prevention plan. The plan outlines everything from risk factors and precautionary steps to locations of water and cooling areas.

Employers can get a sample heat illness prevention plan at http://osha.oregon.gov/OSHAPubs/pubform/heat-sample-program.pdf

Here are some tips for preventing a heat-related illness:

  • Perform the heaviest, most labor-intensive work during the coolest part of the day.
  • Use the buddy system (work in pairs) to monitor the heat.
  • Drink plenty of cool water (one small cup every 15 to 20 minutes).
  • Wear light, loose-fitting, and breathable clothing (such as cotton).
  • Take frequent short breaks in cool, shaded areas – allow your body to cool down.
  • Avoid eating large meals before working in hot environments.
  • Avoid caffeine and alcoholic beverages (these make the body lose water and increase the risk of heat illnesses).
     

To help those suffering from heat exhaustion:

  • Move them to a cool, shaded area. Do not leave them alone.
  • Loosen and remove heavy clothing.
  • Provide cool water to drink (a small cup every 15 minutes) if they are not feeling sick to their stomach.
  • Try to cool them by fanning them. Cool the skin with a spray mist of cold water or a wet cloth.
  • If they do not feel better in a few minutes, call 911 for emergency help.

Employers can calculate the heat index for their worksite with the federal OSHA heat stress app for mobile phones: https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/heat_index/heat_app.html.

Oregon OSHA also offers heat stress prevention videos in English, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EixCKduq-Dwtktktk, and Spanish,  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3LmXddBh_8.

Get more information about heat stress and prevention of heat-related illnesses: http://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/topics/heat-stress.aspx.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 


Multi-Vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 22 westbound- Polk County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/09/18 10:35 AM
2018-07/1002/116015/20180708_190840.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1002/116015/thumb_20180708_190840.jpg

On Sunday July 8, 2018 at about 5:10 pm, a Dodge Ram, driven by Kelton Dillard (81-years-old) from Dallas, attempted to change lanes, when a Red Honda Civic started to pull ahead of him.  The pickup collided with the left rear of the red Civic causing it to spin out of control into the westbound lanes of travel.  The red Civic then collided with a silver Civic driven by Armando Raul Gines-Galan (37-years-old) from Independence.  Both Gines-Galan and his passenger were transported to a local hospital with minor injuries. 

The operator of the red Honda Civic sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. Name will be release pending next of kin notification.

OSP was assisted by Polk County Sheriff's Office, Keizer Police Department, Salem Fire Department and Falk Medical Transport, and Oregon Department of Transportation.




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1002/116015/20180708_190840.jpg , 2018-07/1002/116015/20180708_190639.jpg

Grants awarded for historic properties and archaeology projects throughout the state
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/09/18 9:28 AM

Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, awarded 13 grants totaling $206,000 for historic properties and archaeology projects. Five of the grants were awarded in the Diamonds in the Rough category. This grant funds façade enhancements that restore the historic character of the property. The other 8 grants were in the Preserving Oregon category for properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places and for archaeology projects.

Funded projects:

  • Façade restoration grants in Astoria, Cottage Grove, Dallas, Lebanon, and The Dalles.
  • An archaeology project in Lincoln City.
  •  Preservation of nine historic properties in Astoria, Creswell, Clackamas County, Deschutes County, Linn County, Portland, and Stayton.

These grants are approved by the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation, a nine-member group that reviews nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The members are professionally recognized in the fields of history, architecture, archaeology and other related disciplines.

For more information about the grant program, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.